Takashi Miike's Blade of the Immortal (2017)

MOVIE REVIEW: Takashi Miike’s Blade of the Immortal (2017)

Takashi Miike's Blade of the Immortal (2017)
Blade of the ImmortalAdapted from the critically acclaimed manga, Blade of the Immortal, Takashi Miike’s 100th film, introduces us to an incredibly beautiful story about Manji (Takuya Kimura), a samurai haunted by his past and cursed with immortality, and Rin Asano (Hana Sugisaki), a girl whose parents are killed by Anotsu Kagehisa (Sôta Fukushi) and his Ittō-ryū. Swearing revenge, Rin approaches Manji to request his services as a bodyguard. Eventually, Manji gives in and agrees to be Rin’s bodyguard as she seeks to avenge the death of her parents. Now, to those not too familiar with Miike’s work, he is one of the best in the business when it comes to an extreme amount of stylized violence combined with a deep story, thus making one hell of a film.Blade of the Immortal

With this film, Miike does not disappoint in the least; it is full of blood and guts, over the top stylized violence, and a beautiful story of revenge and redemption. At nearly two and a half hours long, viewers are given a story that moves at an incredibly quick pace and leaves one feeling as if the film was only two hours long. With each fight scene beautifully choreographed and showcasing a number of brutal weapons, viewers are also given the pleasure of watching a samurai film that is not just dueling katanas. It is certainly a refreshing take on revenge films, and I honestly found it delightful to watch as Manji slices through person after person with a variety of bladed implements.

Blade of the ImmortalIn my opinion, Blade of the Immortal is one of Miike’s best films to date and shows his mastery of cinematography, violence, and story-telling. His hundredth film really delivers, and I was not disappointed in the least. I’ve even found myself going back to it a number of times for the artfully choreographed fight scenes — not to mention, the final thirty minutes or so is a fantastically violent battle of Manji versus hundreds with him dispatching them however he can so that he is not overwhelmed. This scene alone exhibits every side of Miike’s artful mastery of filmmaking, and it will keep you enraptured and unable to look away as every shot has been done precisely. For Miike fans, I cannot recommend this film enough, and for people new to Takashi Miike’s work, this is the perfect starting point!




Posted by Spencer Evatt

I have a degree in Philosophy and Literature with an obsession for all forms of horror, especially the more extreme underground stuff. I also plan to have Vampirella as a bride and spend a large amount of free time battling zombies in Resident Evil

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