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HELLABRATION DELUXE! Thirty-One Days of SHOCKTOBER: Day Sixteen – 10/16/18

10/16 – 2002: MAY

“If you can’t find a friend…MAKE ONE.”

Not the exact tag line, but it does capture the main idea behind what I have come to regard, as the best film that writer/director LUCKY MCKEE and his main muse, ANGELA BETTIS, have ever collaborated on. And we’re talking about a duo who also gave us the excellent MASTERS OF HORROR episode, “Sick Girl”, and the movie that almost ran people out of the theater, THE WOMAN, McKee’s excellent team-up with late, great horror author JACK KETCHUM (THE GIRL NEXT DOOR).

I have always been of the half-joking opinion, that there should be a law that states that Angela never be allowed to do movies with any other director but Lucky, and MAY is the reason why. It’s a brilliant, horrific and heartbreaking meditation on loneliness, self-hatred and just that overall feeling of “not being able to fit in.” What would have happened in CARRIE, how would the story have played out if she’d still been bullied, maligned and ostracized, but she had no telekinetic powers to lash out with? MAY provides one truly unsettling and yet also depressingly dark answer to that question.

Bettis, of course, plays the title character, but before that, we see her as a young girl – lonely and isolated, and her condition with a lazy eye doesn’t help things at all.  Her mother gives her a “friend’ to keep her company: a doll in a glass case. But not just any doll.  This is one of the creepiest dolls I think I’ve ever seen in film history – it makes ANNABELLE look like Raggedy Ann!

The grown-up May, some years later, loves to sew and make things. That aptitude translates into what she does for her day job, working for a veterinarian, helping with the animals and even with some surgeries.

Her lesbian co-worker, Polly, (ANNA FARIS with one of her great, subtly funny turns) has something of a crush on May, but things between them stay mostly in the ‘friend zone’.

It’s only when she meets a hunky mechanic named Adam (JEREMY SISTO), that May begins to see the possibilities of having a life beyond her mostly solitary existence. It’s her ‘uniqueness’ that draws both Adam and Polly to her, who consider themselves to be equally “weird” people, but there’s more than a bit of miscommunication going on here.  While their own “off-beat-ness” is something of an affectation, what they’re reading as “quirky” and “interesting” about May is a whole hell of a lot more than that: May’s sanity is hanging on day-by-day, by the slenderest of threads, and it wouldn’t take much at all for it to snap like a rotten twig.  As Adam and May begin to date, he soon realizes because of certain behaviors she exhibits, that this poor girl just simply isn’t ‘all there’ and breaks it off with her.

Then, Polly decides that it’s the perfect time for them to take their friendship to the next level, until she, too, begins to see and sense what Adam did, and she also shuts May out of her life.

Remember what I said about her sanity, and about how it wouldn’t take much for her to lose it? Seems like bald-faced rejection is what finally does the trick.

I don’t want to say anymore than I have to, except that it all leads to an inevitable, bloody and devastatingly sad conclusion. All this girl ever wanted was a true friend, and even at the climax, she never really gets one.  If there were any justice in the cinematic world, Bettis should have gotten an Oscar nod out of this singular and unforgettable performance, but I doubt that the Academy, even though they recognized a movie like THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS – they weren’t quite ready for a film like MAY.

McKee knows at all times exactly what kind of audience he’s aiming for, and he hits the bull’s-eye every time. He does character-driven pieces like no other filmmaker I know, and MAY offers a seductive promise of a neo-Gothic brand of horror, to those fans who are always hungry for something that ventures pretty far off the beaten path of “mainstream” thrills and chills. He likes to examine the human condition in a way that is unapologetically blunt and in-your-face. You can see these attributes in most of his work, but not as sharply defined as it is in MAY.

Sisto, Faris, as well as indie fave JAMES DUVAL and WILL ESTES, all give great performances as friends or friends of May’s ‘friends’, but the responsibility for reaching out and touching the audience most profoundly, rests on Bettis’s slender shoulders, and she is more than capable of handling that task. I don’t hear too many people discussing this movie anymore, which is a damn shame. If any film is deserving of a much wider audience, MAY is definitely one of them.

POST-MORTEM SCRYPT:  This is also the year that gave us RED DRAGON, DOG SOLDIERS, BUBBA HO-TEP, JU-ON: THE GRUDGE, THE RING, DARK WATER, SIGNS, THE EYE and 28 DAYS LATER.


Posted by Samuel Glass in EDITORIALS, FEATURED CONTENT, HALLOWEEN, OPINION, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, THRILLER, TRIBUTE, WOMEN IN HORROR, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Room Laundering (2018)

MOVIE REVIEW: Room Laundering (2018)

Room Laundering (2018) / Fair use doctrine.If you were told you were about to watch a film that is one-part Beetlejuice and one-part The Frighteners but produced by a Japanese filmmaker, would it leave you wondering how something like that could possibly work and what kind of hot mess you’d be left with unspooling before your very cynical eyeballs? The answer, in this case, is co-writer/director Kenji Katagiri’s Room Laundering, a quirky, geeky, unexpectedly charming ‘dramedy’ about grief, loss, coming of age, and finally coming into your own against all of the obstacles that life happens to throw your way…oh, and yeah, it has a few ghosts in it.

Co-written with Tatsuya Umemoto, Room Laundering is the usual story about a very unusual twenty-year-old girl named Mitsuko, “Miko” for short (the winsome Elaiza Ikeda, who could be the Japanese version of Winona Ryder’s Lydia Deetz.) Seemingly dogged by bad luck, after her father died and her mother disappeared when she was a kid, she grew up with her grandmother, who also promptly kicked the bucket when Miko was eighteen. Being the only family she has left, her uncle, Goro (Joe Odagiri) takes her in, and also puts her to work for him in a rather…strange enterprise.

You see, there’s a regulation that says if any untimely deaths take place inside a residence, any potential tenants who intend to move in must be informed of the event. Nobody said WHEN they have to be told, so in order to avoid the money-losing possibility of having people not move into your place at all, you talk to Goro, who then has Miko move in, live there for a time and then leave, giving the place a new lease on life as a rental (no pun intended.) The process is nicknamed “room laundering,” similar to money laundering, but it’s dealing with properties instead.

Oh, and one other wrinkle, by the way – the tenants can’t see or communicate with the restless spirits of the late tenants in these places…but Miko can. (A silly duck lamp, a gift from Miko’s childhood, serves as the indicator of when spirits are present.) Which has resulted in her having very little communication or relationships with living people – not that she minds all that much. The life of being a nomadic medium of sorts seems to suit her, thank you very much.

Things seem to change radically for Miko, however, with the latest two “hauntings” she’s had to deal with. The first is the spirit of a goofy dead punk-rocker named Kimihiko (Kiyohiko Shibukawa), who slit his wrists in the bathtub of one of the places that Miko is ‘laundering’ (and his injuries make for a gross if hysterically funny Tim Burtonesque sight gag).

The second and more serious case is the next apartment, which finds Miko dealing with something she hasn’t before: a murder victim. The ghost in question here is that of Yuki Chikamoto (Kaoru Mitsumune), an office worker who threw herself into cosplay and social media in her off-hours. It’s her gruesome murder (shown mostly offscreen) that opens the movie and her style of haunting that’s closest to what we’ve come to expect in J-horror films like The Grudge and The Ring. But even that is handled with a lighter-than-expected touch by Katagiri.

Miko’s encounters with the murdered ghost of Yuki also brings Yuki’s next-door neighbor Akito (Kentaro) into her orbit. Guilt-ridden by his lack of concern for his former neighbor, grocery store manager Akito has no plans to make the same mistake twice, and in spite of his awkwardness around her, remains determined to get to know Miko a bit better, even though she herself is sworn not to break the number one commandment of her ‘job’, which is “no fraternization with the neighbors.”

To say that Akito changes everything for Miko is a complete understatement. As he begins to gradually break down her barriers, she starts to emerge from the shell of her ‘weird’ existence, discovering that dealing with the living really isn’t as bad as all that…until, of course, the subplot kicks in, where she finally decides to go above and beyond the call of her usual duties to help out both Kimihiko and Yuki, which brings the movie to a tense-yet-funny, and finally satisfying conclusion.

Neither quite as ‘out-there’ as Beetlejuice nor as intense as Peter Jackson’s The Frighteners, Room Laundering takes a more sentimental approach to the like-minded material. Katagiri’s empathy for his characters really shows here, revealing a bit at a time, the layered personalities of each one. Even the supposedly nihilistic Kimihiko and the allegedly self-absorbed Yuki are shown to be a lot more sympathetic than one would think from first impressions.

Especially funny and touching are the interactions that Miko has with the ghost of a dead former classmate and friend, who has the sensibilities of a horny twenty-something man, trapped forever in the form of the grade-schooler he was when he was hit by a car and killed.

The most surprising aspect of the film is how it expresses a belief in the humanity of the living, and yes, even the dead, just when you think that the world is little more than a revolving, never-ending ball of ‘suck.’

The performances are engaging, and the story, though familiar, does a good job of keeping you guessing about characters’ intentions and just exactly how and where Yuki will end up. Katagiri’s direction is sure-footed, as he manages to walk that thin line between pathos and having things become way too maudlin to enjoy.

Room Laundering gets a very solid three-and-a-half out of five stars from me, with a strong recommendation to those who usually avoid J-horror as being too “gross” or “creepy”.

Posted by Samuel Glass in COMING SOON, FAMILY HORROR, HORROR COMEDIES, MOVIE REVIEWS, PARANORMAL, 0 comments
Top Five Films to Watch in October (Part 2)

Top Five Films to Watch in October (Part 2)

Part of the House of Tortured Souls
Staff Pick October 2016

My Top 5 MUST WATCH for October

By Tammie Parker

#5: Halloween (1978) & (2007)

Okay. HOOOW can you NOT watch Halloween in October?

Halloween / Image: Compass International Pictures
And for me, I absolutely must watch both the original and Rob Zombie's revamp! Speaking of Rob, how many of y'all have House of 1,000 Corpses on your list? I mean, when I hear that piano I feel like I just made it home after a 5 year journey!! My cocoon bursts wide open when that music starts playing! HELL, I want to thank the landscape artist that kept that hedge trimmed so perfectly for Michael to peep around. I want to thank Mother Nature for blowing a few crunchy leaves around from time to time so that I mentally teleport to that street. Yes, it only takes one leaf for me to get the feel of the place. I can even hear that big ol' Ford LTD right now! And I have that long cleaver hanging on my kitchen wall, just waiting for a long lost brother that I didn't even know about to pop up. BRING IT ON, MICHAEL! See I'll know exactly when to run for it... I'd know that piano theme music if I was nearly deaf! (heehee)

#4 Friday the 13th (films) (1980-present)

Friday the 13th / Image: Paramount Pictures / Warner Bros.
My second MUST would be all of the Friday the 13th (films)! (Okay, not Manhattan.)

I mean, Jason just has a way with the women, right? And so many of the deaths were so damn unique for the time! And think about how Friday the 13th opened the gate for other horror movies, and how many soon-to-be horror directors learned so much from these movies! Horror authors were born by the dozens! Those deaths seeded — NO demanded — fresh new twists on freakish murder. How many stopped sending their kids to summer camp after this? How many had a sort of horrific epiphany because of these movies? How many 'Oh my God, we're not going camping, fishing, or hiking any more'? How many 'Welp, no more premarital sex for me'? No more, I'm not sleeping in another damn bed that has the possibility of some jackass crawling under! No more weed smoking for me! No more hanging the sheets outside! How many?

#3 Young Frankenstein (1974)

My third would be Young Frankenstein. This year more than usual!! Gene played the hell out of this role!

Young Frankenstein / Image: Gruskoff/Venture Films
"IT'S PRONOUNCED FRONK–EN–STEEEEEN! These one has so many YES! moments in it for me. The look of a classic Universal horror movie, humor, rolls in the hay, and the freshly dead. How eye drawing was the cinematography? And they must of have one hell of a choreographer? Did you see that tapping jig for 'Putting on the Ritz? This one just has such a nice feel!

#2 The Ring (2002)

The Ring / Image: DreamWorks SKG
Fourth? The Ring.

When this movie originally came out, it was soooo different than anything any of us had seen before. How many times did you ask yourself 'What was that?' when the video was rolling? It screwed with your mind! The music and sound effects were spot on and intensified every move. The suspense was like no other, and this new grey cinematography was so crisp! And the master-minds behind it. This was a pretty low budget film, and look at what it did. Just don't ever comb your hair around me if it's long...I am scarred forever, and whatever is nearby will be thrown at your head!

#1 The Exorcist (1973)

Last but not least-- The Exorcist! DUH! It's a classic for us Generation Xers.

The Exorcist / Image: Warner Bros.
It came out the year I was born, so I'm not talking I was at the theater when it was released lol. I first saw it when I was about 12 and I cannot believe — looking back now — how terrified I was of the special effects in this one! Good stuff.

With that being said, let the marathons begin!

Posted by Alan Smithee in HALLOWEEN, HORROR HEROES, IN THE SPOTLIGHT, STAFF PICKS, 2 comments
History of Horror in October

History of Horror in October

By Woofer McWooferson

Join House of Tortured Souls as we celebrate significant dates in the history of horror in October. Click on thumbnails for full images.

October 1 - 7


10/01/1968 – Night of the Living Dead (1968)
released theatrically

19680110_Night of the Living Dead / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19741001_The Texas Chain Saw Massacre / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/01/1974 – The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) released
theatrically


10/02/1959 – The Twilight Zone (original series) premieres on television

19591002_The Twilight Zone / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.


19971002_Castlevania: Symphony of the Night / Cover art. Fair use doctrine.

10/02/1997 – Castlevania: Symphony of the Night released on the PlayStation and Sega Saturn in the United States


10/02/2001 – Tremors 3: Back to Perfection released theatrically

20011002_Tremors 3: Back to Perfection / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


20021003_Darkness / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/03/2002 – Darkness released theatrically


10/04/2002 – Red Dragon released theatrically

20021004_Red Dragon / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


20041004_Zombie Honeymoon / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/04/2004 – Zombie Honeymoon released theatrically


10/04/2005 – Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow released on the Nintendo DS in the United States America

20051004_Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow / Cover art. Fair use doctrine.


19191005_Donald Pleasence / © Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

10/05/1919 – Donald Pleasence (actor in many horror films) born (d. 1995)


10/05/1952 – Clive Barker (author, director, and artist) born

19521005_Clive Barker / Photo by Jean-Paul Aussenard - © WireImage.com - Image courtesy WireImage.com


19621005_Tod Browning / Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images

10/05/1962 – Tod Browning (director of Dracula and Freaks) dies (b. 1880)


10/05/1999 – Angel premieres on television

19991005_Angel / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.


20011005_Joy Ride / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/05/2001 – Joy Ride released theatrically


10/05/2005 – Return of the Living Dead: Necropolis premiers on television

20051005_Return of the Living Dead: Necropolis / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.


20051005_Return of the Living Dead: Rave to the Grave / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.

10/05/2005 – Return of the Living Dead: Rave to the Grave premiers on television


10/06/2006 – The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning released theatrically

20061006_The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


18491007_Edgar Allan Poe / Public domain.

10/07/1849 – Edgar Allan Poe dies (b. 1809)


10/07/1994 – Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation released theatrically

19941007_Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

October 8 - 14


20011008_Castlevania Chronicles / Cover art. Fair use doctrine.

10/08/2001 – Castlevania Chronicles released on the PlayStation in North America


10/11/2002 – Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance released on the Game Boy Advance in the European Union

20021011_Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance / Cover art. Fair use doctrine.


19891013_Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/13/1989 – Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers released theatrically


10/13/1998– Fallen released theatrically

19981013_Fallen / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.


20061013_The Grudge 2 / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/13/2006 – The Grudge 2 released theatrically


10/14/1944 – Udo Kier (actor in many horror films) born

19441014_Udo Kier / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.


19941014_Wes Craven's New Nightmare / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.

10/14/1994 – Wes Craven’s New Nightmare released theatrically


10/14/2005 – The Fog (2005) released theatrically

20051014_The Fog / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

October 15 – 21


19811015_The Evil Dead / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/15/1981– The Evil Dead released theatrically


10/16/1987 – Hello Mary Lou: Prom Night II released theatrically

19871016_Hello Mary Lou: Prom Night II / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19921016_Candyman / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/16/1992 – Candyman released theatrically


10/16/1998 – Bride of Chucky released theatrically

19981016_Bride of Chucky / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


20031017_The Texas Chainsaw Massacre / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/17/2003 – The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003) released theatrically


10/18/1976 – Burnt Offerings released theatrically



19801018_Motel Hell / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/18/1980 – Motel Hell released theatrically


10/18/1985 – Re-Animator released theatrically

19851018_Re-Animator / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19961018_The Dentist / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.

10/18/1996 – The Dentist released theatrically


10/18/2002 – The Ring released theatrically

20021018_The Ring / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


20051018_Day of the Dead 2: Contagium / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.

10/18/2005 – Day of the Dead 2: Contagium released on DVD


10/19/1990 – Night of the Living Dead (1990) released theatrically

19901019_Night of the Living Dead / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


20041019_Zombie Planet / Box artwork. Fair use doctrine.

10/19/2004 – Zombie Planet (1963) released theatrically


10/20/1889 – Bela Lugosi born (d. 1956)

18891020_Bela Lugosi / Image courtesy mptvimages.com


19421020_Night Monster / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/20/1942 – Night Monster released theatrically


10/21/1988 – Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers released theatrically

19881021_Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


20031021_Castlevania: Lament of Innocence / Cover art. Fair use doctrine.

10/21/2003 – Castlevania: Lament of Innocence released on the PlayStation 2 in North America


10/21/2005 – Doom released theatrically

20051021_Doom / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

October 22 - 28


19821022_Halloween III: Season of the Witch / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/22/1982 – Halloween III: Season of the Witch released theatrically


10/22/1988 – Monsters premieres on television

19881022_Monsters / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.


20041022_The Grudge / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/22/2004 – The Grudge released theatrically


10/23/1942 – The Mummy’s Tomb released theatrically

19421023_The Mummy's Tomb / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19591023_Sam Raimi / Photo by Steve Granitz - © WireImage.com - Image courtesy WireImage.com

10/23/1959 – Sam Raimi (creator of the Evil Dead series of films) born


10/23/1987 – Prince of Darkness released theatrically

19871023_Prince of Darkness / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19981023_Brimstone / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.

10/23/1998 – Brimstone premieres on television


10/23/2001 – Thir13en Ghosts released theatrically

20011023_Thir13en Ghosts / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19621024_Eyes Without a Face / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/24/1962 – Eyes Without a Face released theatrically in the United States


10/25/1978 – Halloween released theatrically

19781025_Halloween / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19931025_Vincent Price / Photo by Gabi Rona - © MPTV - Image courtesy mptvimages.com

10/25/1993 – Vincent Price (actor in many horror films) dies (b. 1911)


10/25/2000 – Eternal Darkness: Sanity’s Requiem released on the Nintendo GameCube in Japan

20001025_Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem / Cover art. Fair use doctrine.


19791026_When a Stranger Calls / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/26/1979 – When a Stranger Calls (1979) released theatrically


10/26/2001 – Bones released theatrically

20011026_Bones / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19891027_Shocker / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/27/1989 – Shocker released theatrically


10/27/1989 – Castlevania: The Adventure released on the Game Boy in Japan

19891027_Castlevania: The Adventure / By Judgesurreal777. Fair use doctrine.


19951027_Vampire in Brooklyn / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/27/1995 – Vampire in Brooklyn released theatrically


10/27/1998 – Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 released theatrically

19981027_Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19511028_Joe R. Lansdale / By Materialscientist. Fair use doctrine.

10/28/1951 – Joe R. Lansdale (winner of six Bram Stoker Awards for horror fiction) born


10/28/2005 – Saw II released theatrically
20051028_Saw II / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


20051028_Masters of Horror / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.

10/28/2005 – Masters of Horror premieres on television

October 29 -31


10/29/1920 – The Golem: How He Came Into the World released theatrically in Germany

19201029_The Golem: How He Came Into the World / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19731029_Return of the Blind Dead / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/29/1973 – Return of the Blind Dead released theatrically


10/29/1993 – Return of the Living Dead III released on VHS

19931029_Return of the Living Dead III / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.


19931029_Demon Castle Dracula X: Rondo of Blood / Cover art. Fair use doctrine.

10/29/1993 – Demon Castle Dracula X: Rondo of Blood released on the PC Engine/TurboGrafx 16 in Japan


10/29/2004 – Versus released theatrically

20041029_Versus / Image: IMDb. Fair use doctrine.


20041029_Saw / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/29/2004 – Saw released theatrically


10/30/1938 – The War of the Worlds radio adaptation airs

19381030_The War of the Worlds / Image: Daily News. Fair use doctrine.


19811030_Halloween II / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/30/1981 – Halloween II released theatrically


10/31/1961 – Peter Jackson (director of Bad Taste and Braindead) born

19611031_Peter Jackson / Photo by Tim Whitby - © 2012 Getty Images - Image courtesy gettyimages.com


19741031_Phantom of the Paradise / Theatrical poster. Fair use doctrine.

10/31/1974 – Phantom of the Paradise released theatrically


10/31/1991 – Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest released on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in Japan

19911031_Castlevania II: Simon's Quest / By DASHBot. Fair use doctrine.

Posted by Alan Smithee in HORROR HISTORY, 0 comments

REMAKES: The Never Ending Battle

By John Roisland

remakes%20collage

For a few years now, more and more recently a huge topic has been a large debate amongst horror fans new and old, REMAKES! Now, I’m not hear to end any arguments, nor do I have the power to do so. But I am here to try to discuss this never ending battle between good and bad!

Such classic and iconic horror films have been remade:

Maniac, Psycho, The Omen, The Evil Dead, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Thing, Mother’s Day, The Last House On the Left, Halloween, A Nightmare On Elm Street, Fright Night, Carrie, Dawn of the Dead, I Spit On Your Grave, The Hills Have Eyes, The Fly, The Town That Dreaded Sundown, My Bloody Valentine, The Fog and the list goes on, and on and on, not to mention foreign films that are becoming bastardized by American film makers with Old Boy, The Ring, and coming soon Martyrs (which has been label by many as the best horror film ever!

All these films listed above, are pretty much all house hold horror names, which is  why everyone kept asking the same one worded question: WHY!?

Some argue that some remakes are better than the originals. Maybe some of them are…I personally don’t think so, although there are those that with newer technology, and possibly a larger budget, that are presented as a better film. But my issue is wheres the artistic value in remaking something that someone else has already put their name on.

Some directors  claim they love the original film and wanted to share their vision of how they saw it. Case in point is Rob Zombie’s remake of John Carpenter’s classic Halloween; of which Zombie said he wouldn’t make the film without Carpenter’s blessing. Well he got it,  and the film made boo-coo bucks at the box office, and has seemingly made its own new Halloween franchise. Some it seems to jump on to a known franchise just to make a few dollars off of a sure thing. Others sadly  seem to be to afraid to show the world their own original visions of horror to the big screen, so they hide behind someone else’s work,  and do a remake.

My own personal favorite The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, done and redone…supposedly done again. I’ve actually lost track of what was called a remake, and what was called a continuation. But some I’ve enjoyed…others I was ashamed and almost embarrassed to say it was part of the franchise. But that’s only my opinion.

I can’t say I welcome a remake  with open arms, as I would much rather watch something original  but some I have enjoyed and have appreciated their views and their concepts.  A few I have thought were actually good enough to have stood as its own film, if not having been a remake. Which is a shame, because imagine what it could have been if it was an original. Others fall far from even crossing the finish line.

untitled (2)

A few remakes I have enjoyed and  I have almost been ridiculed for some, such as A Nightmare On Elm Street. When the remake came out in 2010, I enjoyed a more serious approach to the film, and loved Jackie Earle Haley’s portrayal as Freddy Krueger, not saying anything bad against Robert Englund, Just thought Haley’s approach to the role was scarier and less comedic. Something I enjoyed…but again, that’s just my opinion, and I suffered greatly for it.

While with others, some have agreed with me. 2013 Evil Dead remake, while the original is a true cult classic, many have felt that the remake was an incredible horror film, one that could have been its own, and was also a huge success at the box office.

This is a discussion that will carry on for years. It’s like figuring out who has the better pizza: New York or Chicago. It will never end, and those who are putting their artistic vision in a remake… don’t. We want your original thoughts, your dreams, your NIGHTMARES!

A remake, to me, is just about the money. No matter how many, and how big the names are that you get to star in them, it’s still a remake, its still someone else’s original work. It can be good or it can be bad, but  the horror community is a very close, very tight knit family and are very loyal…make a bad movie, they will respect you more, because its yours!

…But this is just one guy’s opinion.

Keep it Evil…

Posted by John Roisland in EDITORIALS, 0 comments
COMING SOON: Rings (2015) Samara Is Back

COMING SOON: Rings (2015) Samara Is Back

Amy Mead

Samara

We all remember the fun loving little girl who climbed up a well and crawled out of a TV to steal your soul in the 2002 Paramount Pictures blockbuster The Ring starring Naomi Watts, who will not return for this one).

Paramount has picked the story back up for another installment in the franchise and has decided to give us a prequel this time. Rings is being brought to you by F. Javier Guitierrez, who both wrote and directed 2008's crime/drama/science fiction film Before the Fall (Tres días).

The prequel story is said to take place before the dreaded VHS tape existed. This time around the story of the young Samara, and the torment and terror that she brought as a child, and why she was thrown down a well by her own mother will unfold.

Rings stars Aimee Teegarden (Scream 4, Friday Night Lights), Johnny Galecki (The Big Bang Theory, Roseanne), Alex Roe (The Calling), and Laura Wiggins (Dance of the Dead, Shameless). Other cast members include former soap opera star Zach Roering (The Vampire Diaries) and Brandon Larracuente (Bloodline).

Filmed in and around Atlanta and Decatur, Georgia, Rings is based on the novel by Kôji Suzuki and adapted for the screen by Jacob Aaron Estes (Mean Creek), Akiva Goldsman (I, Robot, I Am Legend, Fringe), and David Loucka (House at the End of the Street).

With Doug Davison (The Departed, Quarantine, Quarantine 2) and Guillermo del Toro (The Devil's Backbone, Pacific Rim, The Strain) as well as Neal Edelstein (Mulholland Drive, The Ring, The Ring 2) among the executive producers attached, fans of The Ring and The Ring 2 are cautiously optimistic that this prequel will live up to the reputation of the first film. I, for one, was a big fan of the 2002 film, so fingers crossed!

Rings is set to hit theaters November 13, 2015.

Posted by Alan Smithee in COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, 0 comments