Culture Shock (Into the Dark Review)

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Gigi Saul Guerrero (Mexican-Canadian filmmaker) created this horror story by channeling her own Mexican heritage. 

Culture Shock follows Marisol ( Martha Higareda ) a pregnant Mexican woman (that is due at any time) who is trying to cross illegally into the United States to start a fresh life for herself and her baby. With all risks, something unexpected is usually bound to happen. That is exactly what had happened to Marisol and thought she traveled with, border patrol came through and swiped away any potential freedom they yearned. 

Through the mist of the chaos, Marisol wakes up to find herself in an over the top perfect neighborhood. Each day she finds herself waking up in a perfect Stepford Wives scenario with a perfect dress and being greeted by a caretaker named Betty (Barbara Crampton— ReAnimator, You’re Next, Death House). It sounds ideal but Marisol soon catches on with what should have been a fresh start for herself and her baby but soon becomes the “All-American” Nightmare.

  As Marisol sets off for the start of her day, the perfect scene of eating pie and decorating for Independence Day, she starts to recognize Santo (Richard Cabral) one of the other crossers who was on the same bus as her. He went from the rough tattooed-edge look to now having robotic mannerisms and a big smile plastered on his face. It becomes clear not just to Marisol, but for the audience that her people are being stripped of their customs and being brainwashed by “American standards.”

Culture Shock is just a huge wake up call in the midst of how we portray ourselves as a country to what you see plastered on the news. Guerrero’s political twist into the horror genre works out perfectly, it will make you angry, and concerned and just has a major twist to it in the end. If this won’t open your eyes, then how much does it show that we just avoid important issues day to day? After all, lately it’s been one big horror show to some.

Check out the trailer below and then I highly suggest you go watch it on Hulu. And while you’re at it, check out the rest of the anthology because there’s only 2 episodes left before this comes to an end. You won’t regret it. 

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Posted by Sarah Gregory

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