Little Library Of Horrors: Women in Horror Month

Women In Horror

 

When I ask you to think of some iconic authors in the horror genre, who comes to mind first? Stephen King? Edgar Allen Poe? H.P. Lovecraft? Maybe even lesser known authors whom have had made an impact like Jack Ketchum, or Max Brooks. While all of them are important in their own way, I’d like to show some appreciation for the women in the world of horror novels. Like their male counterparts, there are a multitude of female authors that have shaped horror into what it is today.

Ann Rule launched the true crime sub-genre into a frenzy with her intense and very personal novel, “The Stranger Beside Me”, in which she details her friendship with serial killer Ted Bundy and gives us an inside look into his life. Shirley Jackson set the bar for haunted house stories with her terrifying novel, “The Haunting of Hill House”. One of the most influential female authors in not only horror, but literature in general, Mary Shelley, whom created the beloved and often misunderstood Frankenstein’s Monster. Easily one of the most iconic monsters in history. Last, but certainly not least, is an author whom has recently gained a boom in her career after her latest novel gained a lot praise, including a seal of approval from Stephen King. She is an author whom I believe will make an impact in horror not just for women, but for future authors as well. I’m talking of course about Alma Katsu.

Alma Katsu started her writing career back in 2011 when she wrote the first of a three part series called, “The Taker”. It was a huge success and was even named a “Top Ten Debut Novels” that year. Her latest novel, “The Hunger”, has been praised by the horror community and is compared to the earlier works of King. Speaking of which, Stephen King had tweeted that her novel was “deeply, deeply disturbing and hard to put down. Not recommended reading after dark”. I myself have just finished the novel and I couldn’t agree more with King.

“The Hunger” is eerie, terrifying, no holds barred horror at it’s finest. It’s a retelling of the tragic events of The Donner Party with a supernatural twist to it. It does give off an early King feeling because it’s set in a small community like Derry or Jerusalem’s Lot and you get to really know all of the people in the community. Everyone feels unique and real. The pacing is incredibly well done and the sense of paranoia throughout really grips you.

What I love the most though and the reason why I feel like she’ll make such an impact is how real she makes the supernatural in this. Sure, any amount of supernatural takes a little bit of suspension of belief, but isn’t that all of horror? The feeling of unbelieving that something like that is possible and yet, here it is, happening? She has a way of making that suspension so minimal, so minute that it’s hard to even know you’re doing it. Plus the pure fear the characters feel is gut-wrenching. You have to remember that this was an actual event that happened (minus the supernatural, of course). Real people suffered this terror.

I love that Alma took a real life event in our history and gave it her own twist. If you’re into historical fiction with a horror twist, I can’t recommend checking out “The Hunger” enough. She also has a new book coming out on March 10th, 2020 called “The Deep”. She is once again diving into one of the most famous tragedies in human history and cranking up the terror by revisiting the Titanic. I’m excited to see where she goes over the years and I hope you all do yourself a favor and do the same.

Posted by Kryptic Kollector

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