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Crowdfunding Campaign Begins For Sleepaway Camp Documentary

Crowdfunding Campaign Begins For Sleepaway Camp Documentary

Michael Perez EntertainmentFor the last few months reports surface that a documentary on Sleepaway Camp was en route.  Titled, “Angela: The Official Sleepaway Camp Documentary” is now officially in the crowd funding stage.  Launching this week on Indiegogo, the campaign is already approaching $6,000 out of the goal of $65,000.  It still has over two months remaining.  The driving force behind this is Michael Perez.  Perez is responsible for several other documentaries and serves as a talent agent for several actors, including several stars of Sleepaway Camp.

Michael Perez EntertainmentSleepaway Camp is the ultimate of 1980’s cult slasher, that has made actress Felissa Rose a legend (especially at conventions).  Felissa Rose will also serve as an executive producer.

There are several options to pledge and become a part of this campaign, with backing starting at just $15.  There will be a limit of 5,000 copies of the blu ray of the film.  That pledge is $40.

Michael Perez EntertainmentTo view the campaign and/or make a pledge to it, click HERE.  The expected release for the documentary is October of 2020.  Their FACEBOOK page offers updates and announcements of who has signed on to be featured in the documentary.


Posted by Crypt Keeper Clint in Categories, COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, STAFF PICKS, 0 comments
DOC REVIEW: Orozco the Embalmer (2001)

DOC REVIEW: Orozco the Embalmer (2001)

Orozco the Embalmer (2001) / Fair use doctrine.Orozco the Embalmer is a frank documentary made by Japanese director Kiyotaka Tsurisaki and following  Columbian embalmer Froilan Orozco.

I, myself, pursued a career as an embalmer; I thought of it as a caregiving job. No matter what level of kindness someone was shown in life, this is a final chance to be shown love and care before your soulless body is placed back into the earth. Every care and effort should be put into preserving the body and its previous occupant’s dignity. This movie isn’t that…

Orozco the Embalmer (2001) / Fair use doctrine.If you are a true crime or real gore fan, then you will enjoy this, but if you are looking for answers or peace of mind, you will not. This film is more about extreme poverty and one man’s compassion than it is about embalming or death.

Orozco the Embalmer takes place in one of the poorest parts of Columbia with one of the highest crime rates. Death is commonplace and bodies are found around every corner and down every alley. The dead and murdered are stripped and examined in the street in front of onlookers — including children. Many of them would be left to rot if not for one man: Froilan Orozco.

Orozco the Embalmer (2001) / Fair use doctrine.The embalming process in this film isn’t really embalming, at least not as we know it here. It’s more like stuffing using what’s on hand, MacGyver embalming if you will. It’s actually in some ways closer to older methods of taxidermy. Little care is shown to the bodies as they’re handled roughly, gutted, stuffed with plastic bags or dirty rags, and hastily sewn back up. It’s a very different process than you would see in North America where it’s done in a way that’s as non-invasive as possible. A needle is inserted into a major artery, and chemicals are pumped through the veins pushing the blood out. The body doesn’t need to be opened up unless an autopsy is performed. Orozco’s compassion isn’t for the dead but for those they left behind. He performed the procedure for families with little or no money, the families often unable to pay, so they could rest knowing their loved ones received a proper burial.

Orozco the Embalmer (2001) / Fair use doctrine.Orozco embalmed more than 50,000 bodies before his death. He died during the making of the film from complications of a hernia caused by lifting too many bodies.

What I liked about Orozco the Embalmer was that it was raw. A look into the third world and the callousness of life. Imagine living in an environment where death is so commonplace that life loses its meaning. The film was beautiful and cathartic in its own dispassionate way.

Be warned that it does deal with real death and violence including woman and children. It’s honest and completely uncensored.

5/5 shocks for this glimpse into death

Posted by Candace Stone in DOCUMENTARIES, REVIEWS, 0 comments
Haunters: The Art of the Scare (2017)

Haunters: The Art of the Scare (2017)

Haunters: The Art of the Scare - skulls / Image: Fair use doctrine

Haunters: The Art of the Scare, or as many simply refer to it Haunters the Movie, is a 2017 documentary brought to you by Brain Factory Production. Where The American Scream first brought us a light hearted look at local family haunts and a few years later The Houses October Built dabbled into the search for the more extreme in home haunts, Haunters: The Art of the Scare brings you the absolute best of both!

Writer/producer/director Jon Schnitzer takes an in depth look at a wide variety of home haunts through the United States of America. From jump scare haunts to over the top, all out, full contact haunts, Schnitzer serves up a little bit everything for you to sample, a smorgasbord of selections to satisfy your personal palate.

As most of you by now know, I love Halloween and everything about it. Furthermore, I love (crave, even) Halloween-themed movies, so when I first caught wind of Haunters: The Art of the Scare, I was super stoked, to say the least! There is truly nothing I love more than a documentary film about one of my passions…HALLOWEEN!!

Haunters: The Art of the Scare not only examines the art of haunting, it also embraces the passion of legendary haunt actors and shows the history of the haunt and the progression and evolution of home haunts through the years to today’s now legendary the current most extreme haunt in the world – McKamey Manor. Not too shabby considering it’s all being run out of his own home!. It even illustrates how religious organizations actually utilized home haunts to help recruit for their churches.

In-depth behind the scene interviews with haunt owners, actors, builders, and, of course, haunt audience responses cast a light on the underappreciated art of home haunts. The thing I most admired is that not only did Schnitzer capture great behind the scenes footage (it’s always amazing to see what goes on behind the curtain so to speak), but he also captured the haunters’ family lives and how having a home haunt effects and takes its toll on family. Building and running a haunt is a second full-time job for these folks, and as much support as the family gives, sometimes they just run out of things to give…

Haunters: The Art of the Scare does focus a lot on McKamey Manor, but let’s face it, when a haunt requires you to be vetted through a screening process to find out if potential attendees are physically and mentally able of traveling across the world just to go through, you know it’s worth showing! The haunt has gained such huge notoriety that Schnitzer compiled a nice guest list of horror actors and others well-known names in horror (Jen and Sylvia Soska, Jason Blum, and Jessica Cameron to name a few) to add their own thoughts on extreme haunts.

Haunters: The Art of the Scare - Jen and Sylvia Soska / Image: Fair use doctrine

Haunters: The Art of the Scare is currently airing on Netflix and should be high on your to watch list! This documentary packs a punch while still showing the true lives of home haunters!

 

Keep It Evil…

Posted by John Roisland in DOCUMENTARIES, 0 comments

COMING SOON: Boggy Creek Monster

Boggy Creek Monster
The Truth Behind the Legend

By Woofer McWooferson

Boggy Creek MonsterThe Boggy Creek Monster will be prowling across the US soon. The feature-length documentary began filming on April 22, 2016 and is now in post-production. This is the third offering from Small Town Monsters, following Minerva Monster (2015) and Beast of Whitehall (2016).

Author and cryptozoologist Lyle Blackburn (The Beast of Boggy Creek: The True Story of the Fouke Monster) and Brandon Dalo (Beast of Whitehall) will be co-producing. Boggy Creek Monster will primarily focus on the true stories behind the 1972 horror classic The Legend of Boggy Creek.

Writer/director Seth Breedlove refers to the piece as the ultimate repository of information on the Fouke county monster. Thus, Boggy Creek Monster will also cover more recent Bigfoot sightings.

The Legend of Boggy Creek movie poster

The Legend of Boggy Creek movie poster.

Boggy Creek Monster held a Kickstarter for crowd-funding, meeting its first goal of $9,000 in only four days and raising $17,000 by the end of the campaign. Breedlove believes the campaign succeeded because of a growing interest in the mystery and a hunger for information. Breedlove also noted that Boggy Creek Monster will be Small Town Monsters’ biggest production yet, incorporating cinema-grade cameras, night-vision cameras, helicopters, and drones.

The genesis of the film lies in the sightings of the monster by residents in and around Boggy Creek and Fouke, Arkansas. Lyle Blackburn, who is a consultant in addition to producer, will appear in the film to discuss his research on the subject. Zac Palmisano is in charge of the cinematography, and Dalo will score the soundtrack in addition to co-producing.

On May 25, 2016, Small Town Monsters released the first teaser trailer, leaving fans and interested parties wanting more. Take a look and let House of Tortured Souls know what you think.

Those seeking more information can check the Boggy Creek Monster Facebook page or the Small Town Monsters website.

Posted by Alan Smithee in COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, 0 comments
DOC REVIEW: I Am No One (2013)

DOC REVIEW: I Am No One (2013)

By Travis Love

I AM NO ONE
Tonight's film is none other than JABB Pictures' I Am No One. This 2013 release was written and directed by Jason Hoover. The film is shot entirely documentary style in Chicago Illinois and follows the everyday life of Charles Lake, a man obsessed with gambling scratch offs and a gnawing need to engage in murderous endeavors by night.

The beginning narration sets the tone for the film, the short tale of how the Documentarian came to meet Charles Lake. With that tiny snippet of discussion that took place before filming, "If you think that's scary, you should follow me around for a while", you get that twinge of foreboding wash over you and the dark downward spiral of a journey begins.

During the film, you are witness to multiple series of interviews between the filmmaker and Charles Lake. The interviews are casual, relaxed, and normal. The subject matter of these interviews, however, finds Charles reminiscing over his past endeavors as far back as childhood. Morbid tales ranging from almost beating his childhood baseball team catcher to death with a baseball bat to murdering a middle school child 3 to 4 years prior to the interview. Morbid moments like this engross you in the story that much more.

During the journey, things quickly spiral out of control as you go from watching Charles disassemble random Barbie dolls to the first recorded confrontation of him engaging his victim. I don't want to spoil this scene. so let's just say the brutal moment that occurs is vicious and merciless - to say the least. When the filmmaker tries to capture the aftermath on film, things become immediately hostile and without warning the flood gates are opened as the filmmaker realizes that he's plunged into a darkness that is both terrifying and gruesome.

While I won't ruin the ending scene because it's best left to first time viewers to see with virgin eyes, I will say that the tension in the end scene is so thick that it makes you feel almost claustrophobic. This isn't a gore soaked film, but what it is, though, is a film that proves that you don't need buckets of blood if your story writing is this enthralling and immerses you in it completely.

7/10 for this amazing JABB Pictures feature.

Posted by Alan Smithee in DOCUMENTARY REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
DOC REVIEW: Room 237 (2012)

DOC REVIEW: Room 237 (2012)

Room 237 or Stanley Kubrick's Shining Vision of the US?

By Woofer McWooferson

Writer and Director: Rodney Ascher; Stars: Bill Blakemore, Geoffrey Cocks, Juli Kearns, John Fell Ryan, Jay Weidner; Rating: NR; Run Time: 102 min; Genre: Documentary; Country: UK; Language: English; Year: 2012

Room 237 begins with a lengthy disclaimer about the expressed opinions not being those of the filmmakers, and it's not difficult to see why this disclaimer was added. Stanley Kubrick was a master filmmaker, a director whose every scene is packed with clues and symbols that may not be evident on a first or fifth viewing. This documentary examines possible interpretations of many aspects of Kubrick's adaptation of The Shining, a masterful examination of life and death, the natural and supernatural, the real and unreal, penned by the king of horror Stephen King. Because there are multiple interpretations presented, Room 237 seems, at times, haphazardly put together. We move back and forth through The Shining as each theory addresses various aspects of the film that supports that specific interpretation.

Room 237 feels stilted and sometimes forced, but the overall documentary is an interesting examination of Kubrick's reinvisioning of The Shining as well as the minds of the participants. Indeed, we cannot help but bring our own experiences into our interpretations, but the key is to remember that we must look at the larger picture – something some of these critics seem to neglect. Theories range from the plausible to the confusing and finally to the downright comical. Since Kubrick's films are layered with detail and significance, not all theories can be dismissed, but how can we tell which is right? Kubrick may have included aspects of all of these theories, but I'm not entirely convinced. It will take many more viewings for me to weigh in on those.

5/10 claws – the pace is uneven, but it is worth at least one viewing

Posted by Alan Smithee in DOCUMENTARY REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments