found footage

Mothers of Monsters, M.O.M. is a terrifying look into the eyes of a psycho

Mothers of Monsters, M.O.M. is a terrifying look into the eyes of a psycho

There was a time where the rave was found footage films. There have been many trends that followed the pattern. Some die down; some continue going strong. Found footage films have always been a genre that I could never get into or enjoy. For the most part, it’s a shaky camera or not a big pay off. However, one film coming out tomorrow how to write process notes source url viagra soft tabs uk world history essay topics top thesis proposal writer for hire us bibliography online free viagra uk patent websites for research paper sources too much prednisone https://www.sojournercenter.org/finals/being-lazy-essay/85/ custom essay writing service ukash how to setup email account on my iphone do you need a prescription to buy viagra in australia buy essay service online essay about kojiki https://bigsurlandtrust.org/care/can-you-buy-viagra-in-singapore/20/ thesis formatting miten saa viagraa https://bonusfamilies.com/lecture/how-to-write-a-4-paragraph-essay/21/ point of view essay examples http://mechajournal.com/alumni/chatterbees-homework-help-center/12/ case study coffee shop writing web service https://climbingguidesinstitute.org/6951-personal-statement-editing-for-hire-us/ dissertation ghostwriter services us click here get link https://thedsd.com/essay-contest-2015/ cheap term papers article review samples Mothers of Monsters, aka M.O.M. A “, found footage” psychological thriller with a limited theatrical premiere in March 2020 and nationwide digital H.D. rollout to follow! A distraught mother suspects her teenage son is a psychopath who may shoot up his high school, but when he outsmarts the system, she is forced to take matters into her own hands…We’re introduced to a young Jacob Bell played by Bailey Edwards (Bright, My dead boyfriend) being happy, smiling, and slowly acting out.

Given which child doesn’t, but Jacob is showing signs that he’s not caring towards others or even small animals. There are no scenes of graphic violence or the aftermath of such. We slowly begin to see the development between mother and son unfold. Abbey Bell, played by Melinda Hamilton (God Bless America, True Detective, Izombie) Abbey, is fearing that her son may be plotting a grand act of violence towards his school or other horrific acts.

The film does a great job showcasing an exciting drama that feels too real to be a film. Bailey gives a wonderful performance of a young man going through the trials of tribulations of adulthood. Melinda doesn’t smother or even make his life a living hell; It’s just her trying to connect to her son and try to bring the innocent young child she once had, but can’t.

The film grows darker and scarier with a cat and mouse game with his mom. Abbey plant cameras throughout the house, which is a tremendous POV instead of using the basic found footage approach. We see the real emotions from the actors where it’s too real. At times I had to hit pause to remind myself this is just a movie, not a documentary. For myself and maybe others, I saw myself as Bailey growing up given I wasn’t a bad kid, but it was hard growing up back then, and it’s harder today. As an adult, we see ourselves as Melinda wanting the best, hoping to find what we want.

The third act is perhaps the most terrifying because we see the full circle of Jacob. Abby is reaching her breaking point pleading to the universe for her son to come back to reality. Even in the end, where it has, it’s a terrifying climax, we see the true nature of Jacob and understand his character. My jaw dropped, paralyzed in fear for the last 30 minutes of the film to the end of the credits. Tucia Lyman wrote and directed a great movie that plays as a terrifying tale of how real trauma, mental abuse, and how the youth of today, along with even adults go can carry a heavy burden without the use of help or even prescription medications. The film is worth watching for entertainment and for those to see the reality of our choices. The film will be available to rent or own on various digital formats along with a physical release. For more information please visit Mothers of Monsters

 

Posted by Jai Alexis in CAST AND CREW NEWS, Categories, COMING SOON, EXCLUSIVE, FAMILY HORROR, FEATURED CONTENT, GORE OR EXTREME HORROR, HALLOWEEN, HORROR NEWS, MOVIE REVIEWS, NEW RELEASES, REVIEWS, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, STAFF PICKS, THRILLER, WOMEN IN HORROR, 1 comment
M.O.M. (MOTHERS OF MONSTERS) Unveils True to Life Nightmare March 13th

M.O.M. (MOTHERS OF MONSTERS) Unveils True to Life Nightmare March 13th

M.O.M. (Mothers of Monsters) takes an unflinching look at the making of murderers in the mesmerizing found footage thriller starring Melinda Page Hamilton and Bailey Edwards.

Indie Rights has announced the theatrical world premiere and Digital HD rollout of Tucia Lyman’s hard-hitting M.O.M. (Mothers of Monsters).
Melinda Page Hamilton (Netflix’s “Messiah“, “How to Get Away with Murder“) headlines as a troubled single mother who fears that her teenage son, played by Bailey Edwards in a star-making debut, is a duplicitous psychopath.  Desperate to know if her son is capable of murder, she begins recording him at home on a network of spy cameras.
A distraught mother (Hamilton) suspects her teenage son (Edwards) is plotting a school shooting, but when he slips through the cracks of the system, she is forced to take matters into her own hands. After installing an elaborate spy camera system in their home, Abbey captures a series of disturbing videos that confirm her worst fears.
Torn between a mother’s unconditional love and a mother’s acute intuition, Abbey caters her videos to all the other “mothers of monsters” online. Abbey’s plan backfires when Jacob uses a dark family secret against her, launching both mother and son on a terrifying, and ultimately deadly, game of cat and mouse.
Of the film’s genesis and release, Lyman said, “I’ve always been intrigued by real-life horror films that use the dysfunctions of society as a vessel to explore the truth. M.O.M. is a work of narrative fiction, but much of the behavior, scenarios, and dialogue were borrowed from the journals and publications of real-life school shooters and their parents. It is a very confronting film, much like the subject matter itself, and I hope it will contribute to the national debate surrounding mental health stigma and gun violence in America.”
M.O.M. (Mothers of Monsters) will open in Los Angeles for a weeklong run at the Arena Cinelounge on Friday the 13th of March, before the film premieres on Cable and Digital VOD.

Posted by Philip Rogers in COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, 0 comments
New trailer and poster released for HELLmington

New trailer and poster released for HELLmington

This September, discover the frightening truth about Hellmington Asylum.

The frightening HELLmington from writer-directors Justin Hewitt-Drakulic and Alex Lee Williams premieres on DVD and Digital this September.

Genre icon Michael Ironside (Total Recall, Top Gun, Turbo Kid) and Shadowhunters’ Nicola Correia-Damude stars in this year’s ‘Blair Witch Project”, an effectively frightening and chilling look inside the walls of an asylum and the young blogger who disappeared within it.

On June 6, 1985 Hellmington Asylum closed their doors for good. On June 6, 2009 it was re-opened as the very first Psychological Extreme Haunted House, where people could live out their own personal horror fantasies.

Willing participants would be pushed to their limits, blurring the lines between what’s real and what’s in your head. Katie Owens, a true horror fanatic and online blogger was invited as one of the first people to partake in the Hellmington experience.

Only Katie never left…that was 6 years ago, and her disappearance remains unsolved. Police reports stated no body was found, no suspicion of foul play and no evidence was discovered. After many years with no answers, a group of documentary filmmakers decide to join forces with the local police department to investigate and analyze the footage from that night to see.

From Uncork’d Entertainment, HELLmington on VOD and DVD September 10.

Posted by Philip Rogers in COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, 0 comments
HoTS Exclusive Review: The Fear Footage (2018)

HoTS Exclusive Review: The Fear Footage (2018)

I had a chance to view a new film called The Fear Footage. The film starts off as footage found on the body camera of Deputy Cole. It says that on April 19, 2016, the Darkbluff County Sheriff’s Department received calls from residents on Hanmanor Road. One of the houses had been demolished a year prior. It has now reappeared mysteriously. Deputy Cole was sent and never seen from again. Viewers are urged to call the Sheriff’s Department if they have info on the footage or Deputy Cole’s whereabouts.

That is the lead-in for the film. The movie uses a lost art form of first person point of view (POV). We see the film from Deputy Cole’s vantage point as he goes into the house. He now has his gun drawn and is looking for anything suspicious.

Deputy Cole finds a VHS cassette title Fear Footage and puts it into the VCR. He plays the tape and views several segments from different people who are taping moments in their lives. One is a boy who is getting ready for his birthday party. The next is a group of storm chasers. The third and final is a man who is hearing strange sounds from the woods and is trying to document them. Not all shots are first person, but 90% of the film is presented in that manner.

There is a moment that is key. Between two of the segments, the Deputy finds a diary in the house with some disturbing entries. They revolve around the writer finding a tape and its effects on her.

What works in The Fear Footage is the effect for the VHS. You see the grainy “snow” effect that happens when you watch an old VHS cassette. Also, the film seems less like a movie and more like a found footage tape. With almost everything in first person, you can only see from one viewpoint. The advantage is you can’t see around corners and can’t see any potential surprises until they happen.

The knock on this film will be that it is a lot like The Blair Witch Project because it uses the first person, single camera POV. However, any film that uses that approach will draw a comparison to The Blair Witch Project. The main difference between the two is there is far less camera movement in The Fear Footage. For those who got motion sickness or migraines while watching The Blair Witch Project, you won’t feel that with this film.

One of the things I really enjoyed about this is that it uses little special effects. It gives you some good scare moments without using thousands of dollars on effects to do so. This makes it seem like it is more of a real footage tape than a movie.

There are slow parts to this film, but it is almost necessary. There are also some nice surprises and moments that, if watching in the dark, will give you a good jolt.

Viewers who watch The Fear Footage must decide if the house or the videotape is causing the things we see. Overall, this is a very entertaining film that will make you think. You will try to anticipate what may come… it’s not always the case. And what did happen to Deputy Cole? And how did the house mysteriously appear after its demolition? Those questions, you will have to answer on your own!

Posted by Crypt Keeper Clint in COMING SOON, MOVIE REVIEWS, 0 comments
FAN FILM REVIEW: Jason Hawkins’ The Blair Witch Legacy (2018)

FAN FILM REVIEW: Jason Hawkins’ The Blair Witch Legacy (2018)

Getting to review a fan film in its entirety is always a good thing, as it gives one a chance to reflect upon their own feelings towards the original source material.

The Blair Witch Legacy (2018)In the 1990s, I was an awkward teen who often sought solace in the mighty beast of horror fandom.

Frequently, I would see the latest cinematic release and feverishly sit on the edge of my seat, bucket of popcorn in hand, watching each gory moment that adorned the screen.

From the slasher fun of Scream to the seriously creepy repulsion of the cockroaches in Mimic, horror films always caught my attention more than most other things. However, as a huge true crime buff, when the beginning of the “based on true events” era began to rear its ugly head, I admit I was soured.

For me, it was The Blair Witch Project that kicked it all off.

Images of three foolish people running through the woods, freaking out over sounds and stick art just made me yawn. When the sequel Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 was released I did watch it and, surprisingly, always liked it much more ( perhaps it was the use of first-person narrative and shaky camera technique with the original, but that found footage genre has always been rather hit or miss for me). Even the more annoying drone aided remake Blair Witch in 2016 was a disappointment.

The Blair Witch Legacy (2018)So in recent months, when I took on the role of reviewing Jason Hawkins fan film The Blair Witch Legacy, naturally I began to recall my original feelings for The Blair Witch Project.

Gladly, I can be objective and not view it with solely those old feelings in mind, because I actually found that I loved this film. Hawkins took a stale concept and somehow manages to freshen it up. Ironically, what I despised about the original film I found brilliant in this one. I empathized with more of the characters this time around because Hawkins creates equally likable and unlikable leads and supporting roles through his well-paced and interesting script. Sam is our overly ambitious director, played impressively by Samantha Marie Cook. At times, we find Sam a normal woman with valuable goals, but once the film we pick up on her ulterior moments and dark secrets. Cook is great in her role as I found her likable at first, but ended up loathing her antics about midway. She was the character you begin to love to hate. Sam is aided by Cody (played by Cody Epling) and Jason (played by Jason Reynolds) on her quest to uncover the truth behind the original film from 1999. Both Epling and Reynolds inject the much-needed legwork for this film. The duo is fantastic on screen together and clearly fed off each other’s performance with great ease. The Blair Witch Legacy (2018)In the later scenes, they are able to convey their confusion, frustration, and despair so amazingly that I was drawn in rather strongly. The usual “Blair Witch” related tropes are easily present. From the reluctant locals to the more open and bold wannabe historians and witch loving characters, each supporting cast member adds those little nuances that create the folklore and weave a more believable scenario. As the story evolves, we await the confirmation that the witch is either a real case from prior times in the town, or merely a local urban legend and Hawkins tried to leave that interpretation up to his viewer. Do you believe in the witch? Or is there more to the tale still to come? With news from Hawkins that a sequel will begin filming in the summer… I am still awaiting the complete answers before I decide.

Posted by Michelle MIDI Peifer in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, STAFF PICKS, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: The Dark Tapes (2017)

MOVIE REVIEW: The Dark Tapes (2017)

Face the Unknown with The Dark Tapes (2017)

The Dark Tapes (2017) / Fair use DoctrineAfter three long years of dedication and personal funding, Michael McQuown and fellow producers, are proud to present their film The Dark Tapes. This film blends genres with its interlocking story-lines covering horror, fantasy, sci-fi and more. With a crew comprised primarily of himself and four producers (who also served as the primary crew members), The Dark Tapes is Michael McQuown's first film to direct. Fellow producer, Nicola Odeku gave him the original idea for the story. When asked what three words he would use to describe this film, Michael said, “Twists, Tension and Terror”. This film was 100% independent from any studio but that has not affected its achievements. Among the film festival circuit, The Dark Tapes has won or been nominated for 61 awards across 30 festivals. This includes a nomination for a Rondo Hatton Award for “Best Independent Feature”. You can also find it ranked in the top three highest rated films ever on FoundFootageCritic.com.
The Dark Tapes is a found footage horror anthology film comprised of four primary narratives. As you watch, you will find each story original and interweaving with some great surprises in store for you. The scares are not cheap and the fear is genuine. This film doesn't rely on jump scares or gore to scare you. It will build the tension until you must turn your lights back on. It proves that you don’t need a big budget to put out a quality film. Dark imagery, good effects and sincere acting drives it to success.
It is now available for purchase on most VOD platforms, including Amazon, iTunes, VUDU, Google Play, Sling TV, Vimeo, Xbox, PlayStation, and more. Due to its popularity, Michael and his crew are already in pre-production working on a sequel titled The Darker Paths. I expect them to lead us even further into the nightmares with this follow-up.
Check out The Dark Tapes at the links below:

Happy Nightmares,
ZombieGurl

Posted by ZombieGurl in ANTHOLOGY, MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Found Footage 3D (2016)

MOVIE REVIEW: Found Footage 3D (2016)

By Dixielord

I don't make a secret that I'm not a fan of the found footage subgenre. In fact lately I have pretty much came to hate it. There aren't many found footage films I enjoy, among those few, the spectacular *Rec (and it's first sequel), the original Blair Witch Project, and, to lesser degrees Cloverfield and Quarantine (the American remake of *Rec). However most of the films, especially lately are just gimmicks, and found footage is a cheap way for "filmmakers" to churn out a quickie horror film. Many times recently I have wished the genre would just go away.

The synopsis of Found Footage 3D is that a group of friends and associates set out to make the world's first 3-D found footage film. It is of course a horror movie, and the old farm they choose to shoot at is, naturally, reported to be haunted. While personal demons threaten to tear the crew apart, they are also stalked by something more sinister, something supernatural.

So I feel kind of strange writing a positive review for a found footage film, but that's what I'm in the process of doing. The movie is Found Footage 3D. Which makes it a double whopper since I'm not really into the 3-D craze and its inflated prices. Another gimmick. So I sat down to watch this not really expecting much. Even though the found footage concept started to annoy me early on, I found myself laughing at the jokes, and getting into the story. Seeing it on a small screen at a festival I really can't comment on the 3-D other than, once again, I started laughing at the comedic references to them.

Found Footage 3D takes the Scream approach of exploring the rules of horror. Fittingly enough it's the rules of Found Footage horror. Hearing the characters explain and complain about the same points in found footage that I hate and find annoying drew me in. I found myself laughing (at the right times) over and over.

Fans are screaming for Found Footage 3D

Now with all this laughing someone is surely saying "Wasn't this supposed to be a horror film?" Well it is, it's just a horror punctuated with some well placed humor. The first half of the movie is pretty bare on horror elements, but the last 15-20 minutes is a hyper bloodbath of slaughter. I was lured into the slow, relaxed pace and when it went bad it took me by surprise. It happens fast folks, and it's pretty bloody. At least three people in the row behind me screamed at the final scene. I deny screaming, but I did jump even though I knew what was coming. Mini spoiler it's similar to the ending of Paranormal Activity but more effective.

But it's not a perfect film (here he goes). It's still a found footage film, and the same things that annoy me in found footage films, annoyed me in Found Footage 3D. The shaky cam, the always on camera, and basically knowing the outcome the moment you realize it's found footage. Still the fact the crew was self aware, to some extent alleviated these issues. I also had hard time following the plot of the film they were shooting and exactly how it related to the film I was watching. And the ending, as mentioned, I saw it was coming, it was telegraphed pretty well in advance, but hey it still worked for me.

The acting was better than in most found footage movies, special shout out to Scott Allen Perry who seemed at times to be channeling Zack Gallafanakis, but in comedic timing and beardness. Also shout out to Alena Von Stroheim who was drop dead gorgeous and portrayed a sympathetic and likeable victim and possible antagonist. And, lastly, one of the funniest scenes of the film involved John Daws and Doran Ingram as the "old timers".

So while I don't like found footage films, and the subgenre still annoys me, I cant deny that I really enjoyed this film. The laughs (and jumps) speak for themselves. It's not your typical low budget excuse to for a real movie by picking a cheap subgenre. It's an attempt to make a good movie with a much maligned (rightfully so IMO) subgenre, and it's a successful attempt.

These guys....Found Footage 3D

I'm going to give it a 7 out of 10 for rising above the found footage subgenre, but still keeping some of its annoying peculiarities. Found Footage 3D was directed and written by Steven DeGennaro. It stars Alena Von Stroheim and Carter Roy.

Posted by Allen Alberson in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Blair Witch (2016)

MOVIE REVIEW: Blair Witch (2016)

The Blair Witch Is Back

By Dixielord

In 1999, movie making changed forever. A new subgenre of horror was born, the found footage shay cam film. It ushered in a wave of jiggly screens, bouncing videos and migraine headaches. It was a hit movie, and filmed in a way that way too many people believed it was real. It was The Blair Witch Project. Now, fifteen years later, a sequel is being made.

Okay, it's a second sequel if you count Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2, which didn’t follow the story line of the first film and may or may not be considered canon depending on which day of the week you ask the creators. But now we have a true sequel, following the storyline of the first film.

The plot of Blair Witch (2016) concerns the brother of Heather (Heather Donahue) from the original film. After scouring the Internet, he finally finds what he believes is evidence to the location of his missing sister.. Gathering a group of friends and video equipment, they trek into the woods in search of Heather. Instead of his sister they find, just like in 1999, the Blair Witch.

Sadly, however, the 2016 version doesn't have much of the magic of the original. Found footage and shaky cam is no longer a novel device but a pain in the ass. Plus, for a POV movie, there are times when you wonder just where the fuck the footage is coming from; there are some shots that are just not possible from one of their headsets. But that's a small nit picky point. I do think the film would have been better to just forget the shaky cam and go with a traditional steady-cam film. Too many times the quick spins were near nausea-inducing, and the dark scenes did little to build suspense.

Which is my biggest qualm with the film. For a movie like this to work, there has to be a build up of tension. The first film, at least for me, managed to build a sense of fear as Heather, Josh, and Mike wandered lost in the woods. When Josh disappeared, we had no clue what happened; in the new film, even with the black outs, we see way too much. We aren't left to wonder if Josh was taken by the witch? Did he just get lost?Kill himself? Here we see the victims dragged away. It's good for a quick jump, but nothing else.

There was also the decision to show the witch. And of course we have to make her creepy and inhuman looking so we can use the CGI budget. So they add to the back story, and now the witch has been hung from a rack so we have a witch that could give Slenderman a boner. To their credit, the witch does look creepy and inhuman and she's limited to a few quick views. So while it's somewhat effective the addition just seems cheap and unnecessary.

A haunting scene from Blair Witch

One of the more haunting scenes in Blair Witch
Photo credit Lionsgate films. Fair use doctrine.

But I wanted to try and review this on its own merits and haven't seen the original since it's first release. So I'm going to try and limit it to what I liked and disliked in this film. The main thing that killed my enjoyment was the pacing. The beginning was just too ungodly slow. Slow isn't always bad. If you are building tension or developing characters, slow can be good. But an hour in I still didn’t feel like I knew anything about these characters. Nothing beyond the stereotypical horror movie tropes anyway. Then once things become strange, they try to build that tension too fast - people disappearing, people reappearing, people getting lost - all in compressed time. Add to it headache inducing camera work and shifting perspectives that went on too long before the pay off.

The Blair Witch is back

The Blair Witch is back!
Photo credit Lionsgate films. Fair use doctrine.

There was also way too much time at the beginning showing the cast goofing off. There was no real reason for this, it didn’t tell us much about the characters and didn't advance the story, It seemed like nothing more than filler to pad out the length.

Once you get close to the end, the action, and tension does finally ramp up. The POV camera works to the films advantage during the chase and hunt through the cabin. The confusion and claustrophobia starts to make the viewer uneasy (and not just in the tummy), but only the cabin scenes had this effect. The filmmakers tried for a claustrophobia-inducing tunnel scene, but it failed pretty miserably for me. The camera shots, from wherever they came from, made the space look too open. Film is all about illusion and those shots broke the illusion. To see claustrophobia done right check out The Descent or Crawl or Die, where you literally feel suffocated.

I won’t spoil the ending, but I will say, even though it felt like a cheap rip of the end of the original Blair Witch, it did manage to build up my level of dread. There's also the hint that the entire film was some type of paradoxical time loop. Which doesn't really do anything for the film, but it doesn't really detract from it. It's more of an Easter egg than anything else. So let’s call it a push.

So my final verdict? The last 20 minutes or so is serviceable and even scary at times. Sadly it takes way too long to get there and very little tension is built up along the way. It copies a few of the more well known scenes from the original, which is good for a nostalgic “ha”. While casual horror fans might enjoy it, most horror fans will be bored to tears before the action starts. As slow and plodding as the original was, it held me. That's not the case here. I definitely don't see Blair Witch (2016) having anything like the cultural impact of the original. And they didn't even try to convince us it really happened.

The Blair Witch was directed by Adam Wingard (You're Next, The Guest) and stars Callie Hernandez (From Dusk til Dawn:The Series) and James Allen McCune (The Walking Dead). I really wanted to like it but unfortunately I just found it too slow, and the pay off, while not horrible, isn't worth the wait.

4/10 stars

Posted by Allen Alberson in MOVIE REVIEWS, PARANORMAL, REVIEWS, 1 comment
THIS JUST IN: Blair Witch (2016)

THIS JUST IN: Blair Witch (2016)

Witch?? Did Somebody Say Witch?

By Jonathan Patrick Hughes

The Blair Witch Project 05In the summer of 1999, Artisan Entertainment, Haxan Films, and directors Eduardo Sanchez and Daniel Myrick introduced us to a new breed of terror, a film so astounding it made the hairs stand up on the back of our necks and ran shivers down our spines. That film was The Blair Witch Project.

The Blair Witch Project 02The film was made on a micro budget for $22 thousand dollars (the cost of a brand new Ford Taurus at the time) and shattered the box office with a whopping $248 million dollars and became marked as one of the scariest films ever made. Even though this was the second attempt at using found footage material (The Last Broadcast being the first), the film managed to breathe fresh air into the horror genre and start what is now known as the found footage trend.

The Blair Witch Project 01

The Blair Witch Project 03

The Blair Witch Project 04

The Blair Witch Project tells a story of three film students who head to a forest in Maryland to do research on The Blair Witch, the town’s local legend, and are never heard or seen again until one year later when all their footage is found. The Blair Witch Project shocked audiences having them think that the film was actual footage and the movie was real.

The Blair Witch Project 06

Within a few days of its initial release, we learned that it was indeed fake, but that didn't stop the film from being undeniably horrifying. The film opened our eyes and put us in situations we were never in before, and that was the genius behind this dark and eerie tale.

Blair Witch 2 04One year later we were introduced to its sequel also known as Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2. The film was directed by Joe Berlinger, who is known for his documentaries such as The Paradise Lost Trilogy (Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills (1996), Paradise Lost 2: Revelations (2000), and Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory (2011)), which documented the tragic stories on the West Memphis Three, and METALLICA: Some Kind of Monster, which was based on the lives of the band as they fight to stay strong and get through the hardest times while recording one of their studio albums known as St Anger.

Blair Witch 2 03
Blair Witch 2 01

Blair Witch 06Blair Witch 05Blair Witch 2 to me is viewed more as a stand alone film or a tribute rather than a straight up sequel to The Blair Witch Project. BW2 may not be as effective as the original, but it is still a solid piece of sweetness to sink your teeth into, especially around Halloween.

Since the films have made such an impact all over they also released 3 games for PC that takes us further into the legend as well as the story of Rustin Parr who apparently was possessed at one time by Elly Kedward who was also known as The Blair Witch herself. Rustin Parr claimed to have murdered 7 innocent children in his basement. The children were forced to stand in the corner and face the wall as he killed them off one by one. The games themselves weren't nearly as imaginative as the films were but they still managed to sell quite a few pieces.

Blair Witch Vol. i: Rustin Parr
Blair Witch II: The Legend of Coffin Rock
Blair Witch Vol. III: Die Elly Kedward Sage

For over a decade we have heard rumors after rumors that another sequel was being written by the original creators, and after awhile it was almost as if everyone just gave up hope and figured it was never gonna happen. That was until this past weekend at the San Diego Comic Con when we learned that on September 16, 2016, we will be heading back into the black hills forest only to witness the next installment of true evil herself: The Blair Witch.

Blair Witch 03
Blair Witch 02
The dynamic duo of Simon Barrett and Adam Wingard, who are the creative geniuses behind (You're Next, A Horrible Way To Die, and The Guest) unleashed their big surprise and told us that their next film, originally titled The Woods was indeed fake and that the real title is in fact Blair Witch. The team successfully managed to keep this a dark secret for nearly three years and I, for one, am overjoyed to hear this news. If anyone can tell us a true visionary scary take on one of our favorite witches, its these guys. The film was shown to a wide audience over the weekend of the con, and everyone is talking about how impressive it is and how it is a trip back to the highly effective scares and pulse-pounding moments of the original. I am ready to witness the newest entry to The Blair Witch Legacy. Blair Witch will hit cinemas on September 16, 2016, and will go head to head with the very much anticipated Rob Zombie film known as 31. Who is ready for one Hell of a cinematic weekend???

Blair Witch 04

Posted by Jonathan Hughes in COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, PARANORMAL, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: The Black Tape (2014)

MOVIE REVIEW: The Black Tape (2014)

blacktape

By Nick Durham

Found footage flicks are all over the place these days. For every horror subgenre, there’s about thirty found footage flicks dealing with them. Whether they be about monsters, serial killers, paranormal bullshit, or whatever else you can think of that the horror genre has to offer; chances are there’s a found footage flick out there about it. And why not? They’re relatively simple to make, can have a super small micro budget, and if done and distributed right, can be a relative hit, or at the very least, be done pretty damn well. Ramone Menon’s The Black Tape is one such film, as it manages to be a found footage flick that takes a tired subgenre (voyeuristic serial killer) and manages to make it pretty damned entertaining.

The Black Tape focuses on a voyeuristic serial killer that has made the Wilson family a new target. With their eldest daughter home for the holidays, things appear to be nice and business as usual for the family, but it soon becomes apparent that this is anything but the case. I don’t want to give too much away, but very bad things happen to everyone involved here, and by the time things appear to be all wrapped up in the end, there’s a gut punch of a twist that is surprisingly well done and unanticipated.  Well, mostly that is anyway.

From a technical standpoint, The Black Tape is very well made for what it is. The film is well-shot and well-edited, and there’s a very good sense of atmosphere and dread as well. Things like jump scares are surprisingly not too frequent here, which is actually a big plus. One of the annoying things with found footage horror movies are the amount of cheap jump scares that come with them. I’m happy to say that The Black Tape barely has any if at all. Instead, the focus is on the mystery and psychological horror, which is a very nice change of pace.

So yeah, The Black Tape is a very entertaining and well-made found footage horror flick that delivers the goods. If there’s any drawbacks to the film it’s that I feel it may be a bit too long for its own good, but this is only a minor complaint; it’s still surprisingly good. Be on the lookout for director Ramone Menon as well, this guy is going places.

Rating: 4/5.

Posted by Alan Smithee in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Mockingbird (2014)

MOVIE REVIEW: Mockingbird (2014)

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By Nick Durham

What? Another micro-budgeted found footage movie from Blumhouse Productions that features actors you've actually seen once or twice before? Well, here we are. Mockingbird comes from writer/director Bryan Bertino, whom we haven't gotten anything from since his solid 2008 debut The Strangers. That film was a home invasion thriller that didn't offer much up in terms of the motivations of our assailants, where as Mockingbird...is more or less a quasi-home invasion thriller that offers no explanations of the motivations of our little-seen assailants. 

Bryan Bertino is a weird fucking guy.

Anyway, Mockingbird takes place in the magical year of 1995, where things like cell phones weren't widespread, people still had landline phones with easily cut wires, and finding a mysterious camcorder at your front door is the gift that keeps on giving (fun fact: 1995 was the year I discovered my infantile schlong was made for more than just peeing, which is why this year is so special to me). A handful of seemingly unconnected people all find mysterious camcorders at their doorsteps. This includes a husband and wife, a college student, and a mama's boy loser that ends up donning clown makeup. It doesn't take long to realize that there is some bad shit afoot, and it's more than likely that no one is coming out of this intact.

One thing I can definitely praise Mockingbird for is its opening scene. If that doesn't grab you by the throat, nothing will. Sadly though, the rest of the film is pretty much downhill from there, which is massively disappointing because that opening scene will kick you straight in the gut. The creepy moments that unfold drag on and kill a lot of the film's momentum. The suspense never really ramps back up except towards the film's climax, but by that point things become a tad predictable...except for the end reveal of the masterminds behind this whole thing. It is pretty well-acted though, but the setting of the film seems to only make sense so Bertino wouldn't have to worry about today's technology getting in the way of the film's leaps in logic.

So yeah, Mockingbird is a fairly predictable found footage dirge that has a lot of wasted potential. It's disappointing considering this film actually has a lot going for it, but it doesn't deliver on it at all. Still though, that opening scene man...holy shit. It's currently on Netflix, so check it out for that alone.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

Posted by Alan Smithee in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments

MOVIE REVIEW: Area 51 (2015)

By Nick Durham

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I've said it before and I'll say it again: I'm a sucker for nearly anything alien-related. At least that's what I told myself in an effort to feel better after viewing Area 51. The often-delayed and maligned film from Oren Peli, the director of the original Paranormal Activity, has finally seen the light of day...and in all honesty it would have been better for all of us if the film had stayed hidden on the shelf.

A found footage flick about three dudes who decide to break into Area 51 when one of them becomes obsessed with anything extraterrestrial-related. (It's not just hinted at that he's been abducted recently, it gets pounded into your brain...which makes the audience say, "No shit".) Area 51 is a plain old bore. Classifying this film as being "slow burn" is saying it lightly. It takes a long, LONG time for this film to really get going, and when it does seem to get going, it just goes nowhere.

That in itself is my biggest problem with Area 51 - it's just so slow moving. It takes us literally FOREVER to actually get to the titular site, and, when we finally do, it gets breezed through so fast that we barely remember any of the surprisingly cool and creepy things that we do get to see. That being said, those cool and creepy things sadly don't pack enough of an awesome payoff to make the whole affair worth it. Before our trio gets anywhere close to Area 51, they have to break into someone's home to obtain some info to get in. This sequence takes FOREVER as well, and is so drawn out and boring that I actually entertained the idea of turning the movie off.

As for the rest of the movie itself, things aren't flat out awful. The acting is alright, and there are some genuinely creepy moments scattered throughout but definitely not enough to hold interest. Plus, when the audience finally gets to see alien creatures, they're so stock and generic and flat out unoriginal that anyone not asleep will be yawning at the screen.

I really wanted to like Area 51. Found footage style stuff isn't really my thing, but like I said before, anything alien-related I'm fucking over the moon for, so I guess I did kind of look forward to this, even though it was against my better judgment. From a technical standpoint, Area 51 isn't terrible at all, but it doesn't deliver the goods that anyone who's into this particular kind of thing would be looking for. Avoid it except as a sleep aid.

Rating: 1.5/5

Posted by Alan Smithee in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments

MOVIE REVIEW: The Houses October Built (2014)

By John Roisland

Houses October Built
Remember growing up and going to haunts every Halloween season? Some were put on by local charities raising money for their organization, and some were actual production companies. Some were good, some were bad...some even chased you out the door screaming. For the most part, everyone had a good time and was satisfied with the adrenaline rush they had just received from being scared. There were always those, however, who wanted more. More screams, more scares, an extreme haunt...I call your attention to The Houses October Built.

This 2014 film from Room 101 and Foreboding Films takes us on a road trip in search of the extreme haunt. Equipped with a video camera, beer, and a full tank of gas, our investigative team hits the road in a large RV, stopping at Halloween attractions across the US.

During the trip, they encounter all walks of life while in pursuit of the most extreme haunt. They catch word during their travels about a mysterious extreme haunt that only happens on Halloween night and changes location every year. The more clues they find put them one step closer to their goal but also puts them in a dangerous position. What they are seeking in earnest, is now haunting and hunting them.

The film was written and directed by most of the starring cast. It was written by Zack Andrews, Jeff Larson, and Bobby Roe (who also directed), all of whom play themselves in the movie. The film also stars Brandy Schaefer, Mikey Roe, and Chloe Crampton, as well as actual haunt actors.

The Houses October Built, as many nowadays, is filmed in found footage style. The nice thing with this one is that there is little shaky cam so it wont make you dizzy or nauseated watching it. The usual shaking and cutting in and out is very limited for the most part.

On a personal note, I first saw this film a few months ago when it was first released on Netflix. I was anxious to see it because I had been looking forward to it since I first saw the previews. There is something compelling about this film. I can easily watch it repeatedly, but I cant really explain my near fascination with it.

The Houses October Built may not be the perfect horror film; I don't know if one really exists. The feedback on this film seems to be a love/hate situation. I, for one, absolutely love it, and am looking forward to watching it many times over!

Check out their Facebook and official web pages.

Posted by John Roisland in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Ejecta (2014)

MOVIE REVIEW: Ejecta (2014)

By Nick Durham

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I'm a sucker for anything alien-related. I've always had an intense love for science fiction, and any science fiction that gets blended with any kind of horror elements pretty much makes me cream my jeans at the thought. That's why whenever there's any kind of sci-fi/horror flick hitting the scene, I'll usually end up checking it out, even if it's against my better judgment. I should also mention now that if said film involves any kind of alien abduction-type stuff, I'm usually there front and center. That's why when I took one look at the synopsis for Ejecta, I decided to check it out.

A Canadian film from directors Chad Archibald (The Drownsman) and Matt Wiele, Ejecta stars Julian Richings (better known to most as Death from Supernatural) as an alien abductee named Cassidy who gets tracked down by a conspiracy blogger named Sullivan (Adam Seybold). What happens next unfolds out of order, mixing elements of found footage style and traditional narrative styled jump scares and suspense (i.e., you can easily tell that this film had two directors). Somehow, even though this makes Ejecta feel pretty uneven as a whole, it still works...for the most part anyway.

As the film's overarching plot begins to further reveal itself, we get the usual tropes of government conspiracies and alien creature jump scares that end up being fairly predictable, but there are some really surprisingly well-crafted ideas buried within the film's script. Some of these ideas are rarely seen in films of this type, and while they're nothing revolutionary, they make for a welcome change of pace. That, and some really nice twists towards the end, separate Ejecta from other films of its ilk.

The one department where Ejecta deserves a ton of praise is in its acting. Everyone in this film performs really well in their roles, which in all honesty I was a bit surprised at. Films of this type usually feature the standard character tropes of "dude who's been abducted before and knows shit", "dude who believes in aliens and doesn't know shit", and "government operative who knows aliens are real and knows all the shit". While Ejecta does feature all those tropes (in fact, those are our three leads), it uses them all to wonderful effect, and each one is extremely well acted from Richings, Seybold, and Pontypool actress Lisa Houle as the interrogator/doctor who gets way, way more than she bargained for.

Ejecta isn't anything bad, it isn't anything all that special either, and it definitely isn't for everybody. It has its slow burn elements, but when it gets good, it's pretty good. Plus, it runs at a fairly brisk running time, so you could do much, much worse than what this film has to offer. If alien abduction-type scares or anything I've described sounds up your alley at all, check this out.

Rating: 3/5

Posted by Alan Smithee in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments