Godfather of Gore

TOM SAVINI TURNS 72 TODAY!!! HAPPY BIRTHDAY TOM!!!

TOM SAVINI TURNS 72 TODAY!!! HAPPY BIRTHDAY TOM!!!

 

Thomas Vincent Savini was born on November 3, 1946. He is known for his amazing talent as an actor in such films like From Dusk Till Dawn, Planet Terror Creepshow 2 and many many others. In 1990 he directed Night of The living Dead which was a remake of the 1968 classic that was directed by the late, great George A Romero. Tom recently directed a new episode of Flicker, which is a new web series created by Robert Tinnell, telling bite sized horror tales paying homage to silent horror films from the 1920’s.

‘Most of all, Tom Savini is known for his creativity in over the top special make up effects for such films like Friday The 13th, The Prowler, The Burning, Martin, Dawn of The Dead, Creepshow and many many others.

The Godfather of Gore was inspired by the 1957 film, a Thousand Faces. He became fascinated with the magic and illusion of film . While Tom was a combat photographer in Vietnam, he got his first taste of real carnage, which ended up being in his films later on.

Tom Savini has a special makeup effects program located in Monessen, Pa at Douglas Education Center.

In 2013, I had the pleasure of meeting this man at Douglas Education center and even though I knew he was busy at the open house, I was just in awe. Here is the guy that I looked up to my entire life. When I was a kid, I spent majority of my time watching horror films and his name often appeared in the credits under special make up effects.

As a lover of the 70’s and 80’s horror films, I was in shock at just how well the makeup was done, it looked real, it looked disgusting and it looked painful. If Tom’s name was on a film, you knew you were in for a treat of carnage.

One year as a Christmas Gift, I was given VHS tapes of Tom’s work. Scream Greats and Horror Effects and I would watch those back to back all the time. I was overly obsessed with film making and enjoyed seeing how all this magic comes to life on screen.

Say what you want about Tom Savini, but to me he is a legend, a mentor, a filmmaker and a friend.

SMOKE AND MIRRORS, which is a documentary on the life of Tom Savini, is in post production and will hopefully see the light of day very soon.  The film was written and directed by Jason Baker.

 

LET’S ALL WISH TOM A VERY HAPPY BIRTHDAY, TODAY!!!!!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, TOM!!!

 

 

 


Posted by Jonathan Hughes in Categories, CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS, EDITORIALS, 0 comments
Godfather of Gore, Herschell Gordon Lewis, Dies

Godfather of Gore, Herschell Gordon Lewis, Dies

By Woofer McWooferson

Image: PopHorror15 June 1929 - 26 September 2016

House of Tortured Souls is saddened to learn of the death of the Godfather of Gore, horror exploitation filmmaker Herschell Gordon Lewis, at 87.

Lewis almost singlehandedly created the splatter exploitation genre with films like Blood Feast (1963), Two Thousand Maniacs (1964), and Color Me Blood Red (1965). His films were stark, bloody, and unapologetic, and he and his films were roundly criticized when they were released. Nevertheless, audiences ate them up at grindhouses, drive-ins, and midnight movie showings.

According to his IMDb biography,

When major film companies began to invade his splatter-turf, Herschell took a hiatus, shifting full time to his "other career," writing advertising and mailings for marketers worldwide. He became one of a handful of experts to be inducted into the Direct Marketing Association's Hall of Fame. (Author of 32 books on marketing including the classic "On the Art of Writing Copy", Herschell is often called on to lecture on copywriting, just as he is invited to sing the theme from "Two Thousand Maniacs" at horror film festivals.)

Are we surprised? No. The man knew what he was doing.

Among horror fans, H.G. Lewis is a legend and he will be missed.

RIP, Mr. Lewis. Thanks for all the gory fun.

Posted by Alan Smithee in HORROR NEWS, 0 comments
TRIBUTE: Lucio Fulci: The Godfather of Gore

TRIBUTE: Lucio Fulci: The Godfather of Gore

By Amy Lynes

Master of the Macabre
There aren't many people that I idolize but Lucio Fulci is definitely one of them, and he's number one on my list.

I was seventeen and home alone when I watched my first Lucio Fulci film. It was The House By The Cemetery, and watching it alone was a big mistake. HUGE! I sat there for the next hour and a half mesmerized by what was unfolding on the screen in front of me, even though my heart was racing, I was scared out of my mind, and all alone in an old, creepy ass (haunted) house.

Never before had I seen so much blood and gore! I was excited, terrified and repulsed all at the same time. As soon as it ended, I instantly rewound it (yes, it was on VHS) and watched it again. I would watch this wonderfully intense and graphic film three more time before eventually returning it to the video store.

I wanted to see more of this man's work and soon began renting all the films I could get my eager hands on. Zombie (aka Zombi 2) came next and, once again, I was blown away. There were scenes where I actually found myself holding my breath, squirming in my seat and clenching my hands so tightly that my muscles hurt. The famous eyeball puncturing scene was incredibly hard to watch but at the same time I couldn't make myself look away (and found that I didn't really want to anyway). I absolutely loved the way the zombies looked, how it seemed as though they were crumbling right before my eyes, squirming with maggots and missing eyes and appendages. It was fantastic! Still to this day, I prefer the slow gait, movement and organic look of Fulci's zombies, as opposed to the fast movers of today's modern zombie films. There was (and still is) something inherently creepy about the way they shamble so goddamn slowly and cannot be deterred nor distracted. They just keep on coming for you. And the infamous 'Shark vs. Zombie' scene? Once again, I was blown away. I sat there, completely mystified by the skill and imagination that must have gone into the making of that awe inspiring scene. Hell, even all these years later, I still am.

House by the cemetery

I was now completely hooked on this man's amazing talent and there was no going back for me; I just couldn't get enough and I simply HAD to see more. I had to find out everything I could about this director who could bring such vision to the screen while simultaneously scaring the living shit out of me so effectively and see as many of his films as possible.

Next up was The Beyond (aka Seven Doors of Death) which was strong in vivid imagery and unbelievably creepy. I couldn't get it out of my head for days and to this very day, it is still one of my all time favorite horror films. My copy gets watched often, several times a year, and I still get creeped out. Every time.

Then there was The Gates of Hell (aka City of the Living Dead) with the famous drill through the head scene, and the vomiting up of one's intestines and I delighted in the grossness of it, even though it made me retch.

Next up was Demonia, in which a man was quartered. I was horrified but I was also really beginning to like all the gore. It was all so shocking to me, but I seriously just could not get enough. I was addicted to how these movies made me feel, and what they sparked in me.

City drill scene

I soon fell in love with Fulci's ability to use gore to the fullest extent, without it being the primary focus of his films. He had the ability to scare the hell out of me without overwhelming me with the gore, and I was all about it. The excitement became a sort of drug for me, and I became addicted to the adrenaline rush I invariably got from his films.

My parents, however, were less than thrilled with my choice in movies and the only one I could ever get Dad to watch with me was The Psychic. He just couldn't handle the gore Fulci was famous for. I, however, was growing to love it more and more with each film. Years later, I would pass that love on to my brother Clayton, and he eventually ended up just as addicted as I was.

Because I could find so few of his movies and having become utterly obsessed with his work, I tried doing some investigative work to find out all I could about this genius director that I was quickly coming to love. Sadly, this was before the Internet and the libraries had very little to offer, so there wasn't much I could find. It wasn't until many years later that I discovered Netflix and began using the Internet that I was able to get my hands on a number of films that I had only heard about – and even some that I had no clue existed. My first few months on Netflix were exciting ones; I had found hidden horror treasure. The Mother Lode.

Because I was so enamored with Fulci's films, I also then began seeking out films by people who had either inspired Fulci, or had been inspired by him - Mario and Lamberto Bava and Dario Argento. This would also eventually lead to some other obsessions of mine, Argento films and Italian horror in general. But Fulci would always be my favorite.

Fulci has done everything from horror to musicals and even some Spaghetti Westerns and comedies. He was responsible for sixty films and one hundred and twenty scripts. In addition to film making, Fulci also wrote two books Fulci Breaks The Looking Glass and My Lovely Monsters which, sadly, will probably never be translated into English.

Fulci's career hit a high point in 1971-72 with his two Giallos, A Lizard in a Woman's Skin and Don't Torture a Duckling which were both extremely controversial. However, he was briefly blacklisted after Don't Torture a Duckling because it painted an extremely vivid picture of perversity in Catholicism. He was also hauled into court and charged with cruelty to animals due to the very graphic depiction of dogs being mutilated in A Lizard in a Woman's Skin and actually had to show the judge the puppets they used and how they worked before being cleared of the charge.

Fulci Gore

It has been said that the films he made from 1979-83 were some of the most violent ever made. It is really no coincidence that the eighties were his most popular time in America. Sadly, in spite of that, he was never fully given the recognition he deserved. The horror world truly suffered a major loss with his untimely death in 1996.

It saddens me that there will never be another new Fulci film, but for this girl, this master of the macabre will always live on, both in his work, and in the work of many others.

For a complete list of Lucio Fulci's work, check out his IMDB page.

Posted by Alan Smithee in EDITORIALS, HORROR HEROES, 0 comments