gore

MOVIE REVIEW: Jebediah (2011)

MOVIE REVIEW: Jebediah (2011)

By Nicole Robinson

They are a few things in life that are better than a satisfying horror movie. Finding one has become much more difficult since the era of the comic book splashed onto the big screen. In times such as these, some horror fans choose to kick rocks and whine rather than turn to the straight to streaming gems that can be found. This is a mistake and if you need proof, go to Amazon. There you will find Jebediah, a story of a menacing, sickle wielding Amish man with a creative and expressive love of killing from director Joe Ripple and starring Brian Greenwell.

In the role of Jebediah, Greenwell portrays a silent and creepy Amish man with a presence that creates an intimidating persona instilling fear into the victims and the viewers. Greenwell manages to capture a spark of madness as a silent killer. This is no easy task. While a silent killer like Michael Myers can be seriously terrifying, it can also be comical if not portrayed properly. Greenwell almost makes it look easy, leaving the viewer wondering what dark place this actor had to go to in order to embody the role of this madman in the title role of Jebediah.

The main point that can be said about this flick is the violence leaves the viewer wanting nothing in the end. No one is safe and by the end, the carnage leaves no one unscathed. What starts out as a seemingly innocent camping trip among a small group of girlfriends, ends in a blood bath while leaving the audience trying to figure out who among them is going to make it out alive. Lacking predictability is an important feature for any horror movie, and Jebediah manages to make it look easy. Don't bother trying. Just sit back and enjoy the ride. And don't worry, the annoying blond one who is wearing the wedges while walking in the woods does die in the most glorious of ways. Writer Robert Ziegler held nothing back when he penned the deaths of Jebediah's victims. Spoilers withheld, this is not a film for the faint of heart.

From the moment Jebediah curb stomped an infant strapped to a car seat, the audience knows they are in for a treat. Jebediah is not just creepy, but disturbingly violent, providing a level of satisfaction for the viewers that has been seemingly lacking in recent years from the blockbuster films on the big screen. By the end of this slasher film, an uncomfortable, yet satisfying feeling of dread is left with the viewer, probably hoping there is a sequel (there is not sadly). One thing is for certain, this is a fine piece of horror.

Starring: Danielle Lozeau, Jessy Danner, Lauren Lakis, Jemma McDime, Sabrina Taylor-Smith, and Brian Greenwell

To find out more or get your own copy, CLICK HERE 

Posted by Alan Smithee in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
FILM REVIEW: Anarchy Parlor (2015)

FILM REVIEW: Anarchy Parlor (2015)

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By: John Roisland

Anarchy Parlor is the story  of a few friends on vacation in Vilnius, Lithuania. While out one night  partying, one of the guys runs into a long blonde haired heavily tattooed young lady by the name of  Uta, played by Sara Fabel (Gang Busters) who is  very aggressive with the guy, and mentions that she is an apprentice at a local tattoo shop. With this being said, immediately he and one of his friends goes with the girl back to the tattoo parlor, so he can try to put the moves on his new found love, and his friend…well she wants to get a tattoo to remember their trip by.

imagesJMSWEITE

When the three of them alive at the tattoo parlor the guy and Uta go downstairs for a quick little fuck fest while the girl Amy, played by Tiffany DeMarco (Raze, Its Dark Here) stays and waits for the artist, played by Robert LaSardo (Death Race, Human Centipede III, Strangeland , Nip/Tuck). LaSardo and Amy speak for a while getting to know each other, earning a trust amongst them, and decides on a small tattoo to get. Downstairs, Uta has now drugged our young friend and is passed out unconscious. As LaSardo finishes his tattoo on Amy, she passes out from the drug he put into her drink.

The morning after, the rest of the friends come looking for their now lost friends who were last seen going to this tattoo shop. When they get there, they are of course told that they were there, but had left in the wee hours of the night.  The group leaves, very upset and angered…they are sure their friends are in that shop!

Meanwhile, down in the basement better known as a dungeon if you will, we find LaSardo and our apprentice with our new victims tied to a slab strip down to their underwear lying on their stomachs. It is here that we find out the real meaning of Anarchy Parlor. LaSardo and his apprentice perform the art of cutting the skin from the backs of their victims claiming it to be the purest form of canvas. Meanwhile, our other friends have made their way back to the tattoo shop forcing their way in claiming that they know that their friends are here as they searched throughout the building they find a body hung in the basement, with Amy still on the slab.

It is explained by LaSardo’s character that he has been hired to do portraits, of all the members of the oldest and wealthiest family in Lithuania. But the portraits are to be done…on the purest form of canvas there is.  Hence the reason why LaSardo skins his victims.

The movie overall was highly entertaining! It sadly enough will not win any awards although I must say on a high point that Robert Lasardo’s  character I think was written for him. He absolutely nailed this performance. Having had the pleasure of meeting and personally speaking with Robert LaSardo a few times, I can tell you that many personality traits in his character are  very, very similar to Robert’s own mannerisms in real life, (and I say this with the utmost respect) Lasardo is a very well spoken gentleman, who chooses his words wisely…so did his character. He obviously put a lot into his role.  So I definitely must  give huge props to my friend Mr. LaSardo on his performance.

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There are some decent blood and gore scenes in the film,  watching somebody get skinned kinda makes you cringe a little bit. There is a small feel of Hostel during the film, but not one to make you say its a rip-off. I did enjoy the ending…I like where they went with it, that’s all I’m gonna  say about that!

The film was both written and directed by Devon Downs and Kenny Gage and brought to you from A Team Entertainment.

I recommend giving Anarchy Parlor a shot, and next time you’re in a tattoo shop…you might not want to go wandering around.

 

Keep It Evil.

 

Posted by John Roisland in GORE OR EXTREME HORROR, MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 1 comment
MOVIE REVIEW: Autopsy (2008)

MOVIE REVIEW: Autopsy (2008)

Autopsy

Autopsy poster

By John Roisland

2008 After Dark Horrorfest III,  AUTOPSY, written and directed by Adam Gierasch who also brought you Fractured in 2013 and Night of the Demons in 2009.

The story is of a group of friends who leave Mardi Gras after partying,  have a car accident, and are picked up by an ambulance that takes them to a nearby hospital, that can examine their wounds... very carefully!

The problem is, this hospital has been closed for 3 years. It has been taken over by mental patients, the head physician included. The lead physician, played by Robert Patrick ( Terminator 2: Judgment Day, Walk the Line, Copland) has plans of his own, to help his dying wife, by any medical means possible.

The group is seen, one by one, and none return to the lobby to rejoin their friends. At this point things get chaotic as the group finds themselves at the hands of psychos. Unable to escape from the hospital, one by one they are put on the slab, and brutally taken apart...all in the name of science.

This is a really fun movie and was from a great time era of the After Dark releases. The film is full of guts and gore, and even has a few decent scare factors. One memorable scene I always liked is an autopsy with the entrails draped around the operating table like Christmas tree garland. The  film quality is also top rate, which definitely comes thru in the movie as the color and sound are perfect!

Autopsy in Autopsy

The films also stars Jessica Lowndes (Altitude, The Devils Carnival), Ross McCall (Green Street Hooligans , Serving Up Richard), Ashley Schneider ( Extreme Movie, Stupid Teenagers Must Die), Michael Bowen (Less Than Zero, Django Unchained, Kill Bill Vol. 1+2) and Mr. Robert LaSardo (Death Race, Anarchy Parlor, The Human Centipede III, Nip/Tuck, Strangeland), who I must say, was perfect in this role!

The film is now 8 years old, so really there is no reason why you haven't seen it. But if by some chance you WERE born yesterday and haven't, you need to put it on your list! For those of you who have, it's overdue for another good viewing!

7/10

Keep it Evil

Posted by John Roisland in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
The Walking Dead: Who is Negan?

The Walking Dead: Who is Negan?

By Nicole Robinson

Negan

Fans of The Walking Dead comic book series have long awaited to find out who was going to be playing the notorious villain Negan. It was recently announced that The Good Wife and Supernatural alum, Jeffery Dean Morgan, was cast, bringing about speculation that Negan will be appearing sometime during season 6. This was all but confirmed after that mid-season finale’s sneak peek of Daryl, Sasha, and Abraham’s encounter with The Saviors. For those fans that do not read the comic series, you are probably wondering to yourself “Who is Negan and why should I care?”

For those of you wondering this very question, here are some answers.

Negan is a very important comic character and first appears in the series during issue #100. He is the leader of the Saviors. The sneak peek gave us our first introduction to Negan’s group in a very accurate portrayal of their comic counterparts. This is not a small group, but in fact is an entire community like Alexandria and Negan is their leader. He uses fear and brutality to secure their loyalty with burning faces with an iron as example of one punishment for breaking the rules.

From the very beginning, it is very clear that Negan has a special type personality. In his first appearance, his introduces Rick and friends to Lucille, a baseball bat wrapped in barb wire which he uses to random choose his first victim. He knocks at the gates of Alexandria demanding HALF of everything. Half of all of the supplies, weapons, and ammo that the community has collected in exchange for protection. The protection they need is from The Saviors.

Negan randomly choose a victim from a subdued group which happens to be Glenn. While a pregnant Maggie, Rick, and Michonne watch, he beats Glenn to death with Lucille in one of the most memorable and graphic scene of the entire series. This also establishes a lot about the character that is Negan and his impact on the dynamic of the story.

The death of Glenn is one which strikes at the very hearts of Rick and Maggie as well as the rest of the survivors. We learn very quickly that Negan is very narcissistic and charming with absolutely no sense of remorse. He hears Glenn beg for his life and yet he still smashes Lucille into his skull and at one point even laughs and says “He is taking it like a champ”. Rick swears to avenge Glenn and kill Negan but this does not even phase him. He just laughs more and beats Rick with his bare hands before leaving.

Negan is a psychotic, witty, intelligent, and brutal. He occasionally will display a warped sense of sympathy but lacks empathy completely. And he is coming to the TV counterpart during the second half of season 6. Jeffery Dean Morgan was recently announced to have been casted as the iconic villain settling any questions as to whether or not Rick would come face to face with Negan before season 7. Does this spell the end for Glenn?

So far the television series has mixed up the death count to be different from the comic counterpart. Bob replaced Dale as tainted meat. Tyresse died at Shirewilt Estates last season in a reverse of sorts having first appeared at Wiltshire Estates previous to the prison in the comic. Sasha seems to be taking over the role of Andrea as the sniper. Chances are the writers will do the same for Glenn especially after the whole dumpster ordeal. One major theory that seems to hold the most weight is that Daryl will be the one to meet Lucille if and when Negan shows up this season.

Before you start getting out the riot gear, think about this a little. We have been seeing less and less of Daryl this season as if we are being weaned off of him. His story seems to have become very stale since Beth died. What more does Daryl Dixon really have to offer The Walking Dead? He has come to terms with his past and who he is. He trusts people a lot more now, even going out as a recruiter for Alexandria. He became a valued member of the group, really growing out of the whole racist redneck image we had of him in season 1.

Another aspect to consider is that Daryl is second only to Rick as the most popular Character on a show that claims “No One Is Safe”.  The moment that Negan arrives and brutal ends Glenn is one of the moment significant moments of the entire comic series. Glenn has played second fiddle to Daryl since the start, having has a much larger role in comic series as well as being a fan favorite. Whomever gets Lucille has to make a huge impact.

The major point about Glenn’s death is that is makes the readers really hate Negan. There is no one else besides that Daryl that could make the audience hate Negan on the level we need too for the TV series. The legions of fan screaming “If Daryl Dies We Riot” can only keep him safe for so long. The appearance of Negan brings about a new chapter for The Walking Dead and Lucille is thirsty.

It will a long wait for the 2nd half of season 6. The first 8 episodes started out strong and ended…. Well…. Good. When season 6 picks back on Valentine’s Day with the episode “No Way Out”, here is to hoping they make it up to us with a lot of death, especially for Sam. He really needs to die for speaking a syllable while walking through a herd in a walker gut covered bed sheet.

Posted by Alan Smithee in BOOKS, COMICS, AND PUBLICATION REVIEWS, EDITORIALS, REVIEWS, SERIES REVIEWS, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Flowers (2015)

MOVIE REVIEW: Flowers (2015)

By Travis Love

Flowers

Directed by Phil Stevens and released on October 27, 2015, by Unearthed Films, Flowers is an Arthouse horror film that delves into the grim tale of six women who awaken disoriented and unaware of how they've arrived in this state of surreal, dream-esque purgatory, until they discover they've all suffered the same grisly fate at the hands of the same demented aggressor. Abandon all hope ye who awaken under a porch surrounded by body filled Glad trash bags.

Watching Flowers and trying to convey to someone what it is, is the equivalent of trying to explain how Pornhub works to a blind man. He really doesn't understand what you mean because he's never experienced it before for himself (unfortunately braille Pornhub never caught on...sorry Stevie Wonder). The film is as dark and depressing as it is morbidly fascinating and eerily beautiful, with equal aspects macabre and performance art combing to create one of the most truly genuinely unique cinema experiences you could ever hope for.

The fact that there is no dialog in the film allows you to immerse yourself fully in the imagery, taking in every minute detail of the scenery. The scenes piece together almost like Dante Alighieri's Inferno, with each character feeling like they're in their own circle of hell. Each character transitions to a different person and tale as they crawl from underneath the porch, to under the house, to the bathroom through a hole in the floor and so on. Past events with the victims are tied to Polaroids that they either awaken with, or discover during their venturing through the house. Each picture triggers a memory for each character that holds some barring on their life before and their personal encounter with the antagonist.

As far as gore goes, Flowers even delivers artistically in that regard as well, with scenes that run the gamut of twisted and perverted (fondling the intestines of a disemboweled victim before warming up her dead body like a gas station burrito necrophilia style) to ethereal and metaphorical (a victim discovering she's hollow on the inside and begins stuffing what she believes are her internal organs inside the open cavity, but to the outside perspective she's only stuffing her gaping hole with earth and worms). Morbid imagery has never looked so enthralling and engaging.

In conclusion, Flowers achieves what so many films set out to do, it establishes its originality and individuality proudly in leaps and bounds and sets a precedent that films can be artistically beautiful and engaging while at the same time brooding and aberrant. Do yourself a favor and let Flowers put something hauntingly beautiful inside you...and possibly some fingers as well.

Rating: 8/10

-Travis

Posted by Alan Smithee in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
COMING SOON: An Inside Remake (2016)

COMING SOON: An Inside Remake (2016)

By Dixielord

Inside remake

Inside remake

The Hollywood foreign to American, remake machine is in full swing. Now coming not long after word that the American remake of Martyrs will soon hit the screen, it appears a remake of Inside is going forward. Inside, along with Martyrs, and others, was part of a wave of extreme gore French horror films. Now Inside (2007) is up to get the typical watered down Hollywood remake formula.

The Martyrs remake went through a lot of changes, from early reports that it would star Kristen Stewart, to the project being shelved, before finally the powers that be decided to throw out a cheap quickie of a film so as not to lose the rights. The Inside remake at least looks like they are taking the time to hire a decent writer and director.

As of now the project, a Spanish produced, English language production is set to be directed by Miguel Angel Vivas, best known for the well received Spanish language film Kidnapped. The script in play now was written by Jaume Balaguero, director of the excellent Spanish horror film Rec, and Manu Diez, who co-wrote Rec 2 and Rec 4: Apocalypse. So the project, at least for now, has some decent talent attached.

Jaume Belaguero and Manuela Velasco

Manuela Velasco, star of Rec, and Jaume Balaguero of Rec and the Inside remake

Haven't writers and directors who have been successful in the horror genre, although Kidnapped was more thriller than horror, does bode well for the Inside remake. But the thriller part concerns me a bit. The producers have said that the Inside remake would be a taut thriller focusing on a battle between two would be mothers.. OK, there is a thin line between horror and thriller but the original pole vaulted that line and landed in the territory of straight up gore and horror. Making this film a thriller, appears to be an attempt to tone it down. And there is no reason to tone it down, except producers don't think American audiences will crowd into a gorefest.

Inside remake

The Inside Remake based on the 2007 Gorefest Inside

Still if it looks to be a decent film, I will watch it. Even though it's unnecessary. It's still a long time till the Inside remake hits the screen. It's scheduled to start filming in February 2016, and even that is subject to change. As of now there is no cast attached and only one publicity photo. It doesn't even appear to have an IMDb page yet. Whatever eventually happens with the Inside remake, the trend isn't going to stop. Remakes, re-imaginings, reboots, or whatever you prefer to call them are here to stay. All we can do is hope they do justice to the originals that we love.

Posted by Allen Alberson in HORROR NEWS, 0 comments
HALLOWEEN HORRORS: The Collector (2009)

HALLOWEEN HORRORS: The Collector (2009)

By John Roisland

Collector 4

In 2009, Marcus Dunstan, who brought you such titles as Saw IV and Saw V, brought you his clever game of cat and mouse, The Collector. This 90 minute sleeper, released by Vivendi and Genius Entertainment, unfortunately didn't do much at the box office, but was a bit of a hit with the rental market and with me!

Josh Stewart (The Dark Knight Rises , The Curious Case of Benjamin Button) stars as Arkin, an ex-con turned handy man who is trying to make good in life as well as make good to the loan shark that his wife racked up some hefty bills with while trying to stay afloat while Arkin was in the joint. Arkin offers to settle up by doing a job in his wealthy client’s home since he and his family are preparing to leave for a family vacation.

Both parties agree, but unfortunately for our star, someone has laid claim to this house first. Only difference is, this guy’s not there to rob them of jewelry; he robs them of lives. The Collector, played by Juan Fernandez (A Man Apart), has already settled in and transformed the house into a giant booby-trap full of torturous devices making it nearly impossible to escape.

Arkin arrives at the house to steal his new wealth, when he comes across the homeowners who are being held captive...in a giant foot locker. They warn him of the intruder and try to sneak out only to find themselves encountering deadly trap after deadly trap. You see, our new found collector, collects bodies. Tortures, murders, keeps them for his...collection.

I will say that there is a feeling of the Saw series present in the film. Even though this may not be as over the top or action packed as Saw, and sometimes it gets kinda slow, they did a good job with it. The film and lighting captured the feel of desperate people caught in their own home transformed into traps as well as the feel of The Collector’s driving need to collect. Some of the torture scenes were pretty original and gory. I have got to give props when they are due. While having a good blood and gore level, the film still held a nice atmosphere of suspense for its audience.

The film I thought ended perfectly into the ending credits...yes, also leaving it open for a sequel, that I'd rather not even discuss!

This one is a great watch. It keeps your interest without overdoing it. The acting, while maybe not being spot on by all of the cast, most still give a worthy performance. I do certainly enjoy this film, and suggest that if you haven't checked it out, that you do so!

Posted by John Roisland in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Cannibal Apocalypse (1980)

MOVIE REVIEW: Cannibal Apocalypse (1980)

Cannibal Holocaust

By Dixielord

Cannibal Apocalypse

I have mentioned before that I am a big fan of horror movies of the 70s and 80s. I'm especially fond of those low budget schlockers from the period, and even more so those films branded as a Video Nasty. I have been a fan of the zombie films of the period for a long time and have recently started searching out the Italian cannibal movies from around the same time. This search lead me to Cannibal Apocalypse.

At first I thought this was going to be just another cannibal epic set deep in the jungles of New Guinea, or the Amazon, a la Cannibal Holocaust or Cannibal Ferox. However doing some research Cannibal Apocalypse turned out to be something entirely different.

Cannibal Apocalypse stars horror legend John Saxon as Gordon Hopper, a Viet Nam vet still haunted by a traumatic event during the war. In a dream we see him flash back to Viet Nam, where he is bitten by one of two captured service men, one of whom he knew from back home. He wakes up to get a call from one of the soldiers, Charlie Bukowski (Giovanni Lombardo Radice) who has just been released from a mental hospital.

Bukowski wants to meet up with his war buddy for coffee. However, Hopper, disturbed by the dream, and being hit on by his (possibly underage) neighbor Mary, refuses. Bukowski feeling abandoned and betrayed again, set off on his own. After attacking a woman in a movie theater, he goes on a rampage, killing several people and biting a police officer before being subdued and carted back to the mental hospital. Meanwhile, Hopper has been experiencing a desire for raw meat. He breaks out Bukowski and two other infected, Thompson (who bit Hopper) and an infected nurse. The four fugitives then lead police in a chase across Atlanta and into the cities sewers, spreading the cannibal contagion as they go.

Cannibal Apocalypse is a strange film on many fronts. While ostensibly it belongs to the European Cannibal sub genre, it many ways it's closer to the zombie movies of the same time period. It treats cannibalism similar to the zombie virus, as it can be transferred through a bite. However, it's set mostly in the city of Atlanta where most European zombie and cannibal films of the period were set deep in the jungle.

While Cannibal Apocalypse is far from bloodless, it is relatively tame in the gore department, especially for a video nasty. Honestly, watching it I never really understood why this film would be banned, other than the fact it dealt with cannibalism. Director Antonio Margheriti isn't so much known for gore but more for gothic horror, and it's believed producers pushed him to add gore just for commercial reasons. The gore that the film has is good, the bites are deep and bloody, and there is a shot gun killing that goes on forever with bloody consequence.

The film borrows heavily in some scenes from Dawn of the Dead, which is only fitting since Dawn was the founder of the Italian gore craze of the era. There is a shoot out with a gang in a flea market. In another nod to Dawn, a large part of the second half is a group of four people on the run, a group of one black man, two white men and a white woman, the same makeup as the main group in Dawn. Even the wardrobes of Saxon and Actress May Heatherly seem eerily similar to Gaylen Ross and David Emge of Dawn. There were times that looking at May, I thought, “Damn, she really looks a lot like Gaylen.”

You could even posit that Cannibal Apocalypse is a reverse copy of Dawn. In Dawn of the Dead we follow a group of uninfected as they flee, seeking shelter from the infected undead. In Apocalypse, it's reversed with a group of infected (soldiers versus police) fleeing from those not rabid for human flesh.

Even though technically this is a European Cannibal film borrowing heavily from the zombie genre, it's more than a horror film. Beyond all this Cannibal Apocalypse is a movie about the Vietnam War and its effects on the men who fought it.

John Saxon's Hopper is a vet who outwardly seems normal and healthy, but inside he's haunted by his time in the jungle. He dreams about it at night and in the day time struggles with the blood lust (represented by cannibalism), that he needed to survive the war. Fellow vets Bukowski and Thompson aren't as lucky. After being held prisoner by the Vietcong, their minds have broken, their blood lust is uncontrollable. Coming home, they are locked away and forgotten, even by their comrade Hopper.

After Bukowski is “cured” all it takes is a war movie and an act of sexuality to fully reawaken his rage and hunger. Being in the presence of his fellow vets causes Hopper's fragile, but well maintained control to break

You could make the case that Cannibal Apocalypse is a condemnation not only of the Vietnamese War but of war in general. War, where we take young men, teach them how to kill, but when the war's over we don’t teach them how to not kill anymore. We drop them into hell and force them to adapt, then expect them to adapt easily back into normal life. Those who can't end up locked away, or more so recently, living on the streets.

While Cannibal Apocalypse might not be great, high cinema, it is certainly a better film than many of the video nasties. That's not meant as a knock to those films, many of which I truly love, but a lot of them were made for purely shock value and to make a quick buck. There's a story to Cannibal Apocalypse, and it's a damn good story worth watching and worth talking about - especially today with our country involved in wars and rumors of war, with our streets, and hospitals overcrowded with wounded vets. Today, when soldiers are dying faster by their own hands than the hands of their enemies, and there's no answer for PTSD in sight.

Cannibal Apocalypse will never have the impact of films like Apocalypse Now, The Deer Hunter, or Born on the Fourth of July, but for a gory horror film, it's pretty damn deep.

Posted by Allen Alberson in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments