Horror novels

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark…2?

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark…2?

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Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark 2 will be most likely be a continuation of the first film.

During Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark’s climax, the Jangly Man attempts to kill Stella’s new friend Ramón Morales, who revealed to be a draft dodger. At the local hospital, audio recordings show that Ephraim Bellows conducted experiments on his sister at that exact location during the late 19th century. Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark reaches its primary conflict, as Stella convinces Sarah that she was victimized and inadvertently turned in a monster full of rage. Stella writes a new story in blood and states that she and Ruth Steinberg will attempt to find Auggie and Chuck.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark grossed $20.84 million in its opening weekend. It wouldn’t be at all surprising if a sequel were put into development soon. After all, there’s plenty more source material to use.

Assuming that Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark 2 is “fast-tracked,” the sequel could begin filming in the first half of 2020 for a 2021 release date.

Personally I…enjoyed it!!! However, I like bad movies…take me with a massive grain of salt….and an enormous love of the genre!

4 out of 5 coffins

Fun story…great artwork!!!

Posted by justin orman thompson in CAST AND CREW NEWS, Categories, COMING SOON, FAMILY HORROR, FICTION AND POETRY, FRIENDS OF THE HOUSE, GORE OR EXTREME HORROR, HALLOWEEN, HORROR HISTORY, HORROR NEWS, MONSTERS AND CREATURES, MOVIE REVIEWS, MYTHS AND LEGENDS, PREQUELS AND SEQUELS, REVIEWS, SATANIC/DEMONIC, SCI-FI HORROR, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, THRILLER, VAMPIRES, WEREWOLVES, WOMEN IN HORROR, ZOMBIES, 0 comments
True Crime, debut novel by Samantha Kolesnik coming 2020

True Crime, debut novel by Samantha Kolesnik coming 2020

When I first saw Mama’s boy, I was blown away and wanted more from the short film. Her writing style was dark, disturbing, but as the audience, we can’t help but want more. Almost as if we’re looking through the peephole or rear window of an actual crime being committed. Samantha Kolesnik has made a name for herself as a writer and director. Samantha now has a debut novel coming out next year entitled. True Crime.

Grindhouse Press Announces January 15th, 2020 Release Date for TRUE CRIME, Debut Novel by Samantha Kolesnik

TRUE CRIME, the disturbing debut novel by Samantha Kolesnik, is forthcoming from Grindhouse Press on January 15th, 2020. “A debut with the power of a nuclear bomb. Ranks alongside Jack Ketchum’s The Girl Next Door and J. F. Gonzalez’s Survivor.” — Brian Keene, author of The Rising 

TRUE CRIME’s synopsis reads, “Suzy and her brother, Lim, live with their abusive mother in a town where the stars don’t shine at night. Once the abuse becomes too much to handle the two siblings embark on a sordid cross-country murder spree beginning with their mom. As the murder tally rises, Suzy’s mental state spirals into irredeemable madness.” Grindhouse Press is an independent press known for horror, dark fiction, transgressive fiction and extreme horror. It is owned by author C.V. Hunt (Ritualistic Human Sacrifice, Cockblock) and is an imprint of Atlatl Press which is owned by author Andersen Prunty (Fuckness, Sociopaths In Love). Grindhouse Press is home to works by authors such as Bryan Smith, Kristopher Triana, John Wayne Comunale, Matt Serafini, and more.

Posted by Jai Alexis in BOOKS, COMICS, AND PUBLICATION REVIEWS, BRUTAL REALITY, CAST AND CREW NEWS, Categories, COMING SOON, EVENTS, EXCLUSIVE, FEATURED ARTISTS, FEATURED CONTENT, FICTION AND POETRY, FRIENDS OF THE HOUSE, GORE OR EXTREME HORROR, HALLOWEEN, HORROR HEROES, HORROR HISTORY, HORROR NEWS, IN THE SPOTLIGHT, MYTHS AND LEGENDS, NEW RELEASES, PRESS RELEASES, REVIEWS, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, STAFF PICKS, THRILLER, WOMEN IN HORROR, 0 comments
[TRAILER] IT: CHAPTER 2. The Losers Club comes back home.

[TRAILER] IT: CHAPTER 2. The Losers Club comes back home.

Here’s your first look at the new movie coming out Sept 6th. IT: CHAPTER 2. The film is set 25 years later in the future with flashbacks to them as their younger selves. The movie is said to be brutal and with a scene using the most blood in a film ever. The stakes have never been higher not only for our beloved Losers but for fans of the book and movie.

Twenty-seven years after their first encounter with the terrifying Pennywise, the Losers Club have grown up and moved away, until a devastating phone call brings them back.

There are even talks that this movie could surpass the 150 million opening weekend with talks from the director that he would love to do the third film. A prequel because there are stories of the past along with Pennywise’s account. Below is the trailer for the film.

Posted by Jai Alexis in CAST AND CREW NEWS, COMING SOON, EVENTS, EXCLUSIVE, GORE OR EXTREME HORROR, HALLOWEEN, HORROR HEROES, HORROR HISTORY, HORROR NEWS, IN THE SPOTLIGHT, MONSTERS AND CREATURES, MOVIE REVIEWS, MYTHS AND LEGENDS, NEW RELEASES, PARANORMAL, PREQUELS AND SEQUELS, REVIEWS, SCI-FI HORROR, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, STAFF PICKS, THRILLER, 0 comments
BOOK REVIEW: The Ruins (2006)

BOOK REVIEW: The Ruins (2006)

The Ruins

Ruins_Smith_Cover

By the author of A Simple Plan

 

Author: Scott Smith; Cover Artist: Peter Mendelsund; Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf; ISBN: 1-4000-4387-5; Media: Hardcover; Length: 319 pages; Genre: Horror; Country: USA; Language: English; Year: 2006

In 2006 Scott Smith quietly published The Ruins, an inconspicuous little horror novel that Stephen King called “The Book of the Summer”. King recommended it in his column for Entertainment Weekly with these words:

“...last heard from in 1993 (A Simple Plan, later filmed by Sam Raimi from Smith’s script). No quietly building, Ruth Rendell-style suspense here; Smith intends to scare the bejabbers out of you, and succeeds. There are no chapters and no cutaways — The Ruins is your basic long scream of horror. It does for Mexican vacations what Jaws did for New England beaches in 1975. It doesn’t succeed completely — it felt 30 pages too long — but it works well enough, I think, to be the book most people will be talking about this summer.”

And he's right. The Ruins is a compelling read, leading the reader breathlessly onward to find out what happens to the protagonists. And those protagonists are real. Smith paints them as people should be – in all their glory and faults – and this makes the reader feel for them and hunger to know their fates. The story, about vacationing Americans who run into trouble in a foreign country, has been done time and time again, but this Mexican vacation pits them against a different kind of antagonist. It's a refreshing change from the same old “vacationers from another country are tortured and killed by sadists” and a far cry from the usual “trouble in the woods” fare. Scott's villain is a breath of fresh air and takes the reader by surprise.

The Ruins begins with two couples on a final vacation before moving on after college. Jeff and Amy will be attending medical school in the fall, and Eric will be teaching school while Stacy will be studying to become a social worker. While scuba diving, they meet Matthias, a German tourist whose brother, Heinrich, has been missing a few days, and his three Greek friends who, for laughs, call themselves Pablo, Juan, and Don Quixote and swap the names around on a whim. As the end of his vacation approaches, Matthias decides to go searching for his brother at the ruins where he went with a pretty young archaeologist he'd met on her first day there. Jeff assures Matthias they will accompany him for a chance to see some of the authentic Mexico, and the following morning, they meet in the lobby where the couples are surprised to see Pablo has decided to come, too. After a long trip that goes first by bus, then by taxi, and finally on foot, the six friends arrive at the ruins, which are both breathtaking and eerily quiet.

As they mill about, Amy snaps some pictures of the group, and a Mayan from the village they passed through arrives on horseback. Unable to control his horse after he dismounts, the Mayan releases the reins and the horse bolts back the way they came. He seems neither surprised nor disturbed by this and concentrates on trying to convince the group to leave but they are unable to understand him. Frustrated, he pulls a gun and more emphatically yells at them as two more men, these armed with bows and arrows, arrive on horseback. As the Mayans talk and further try to persuade the tourists to leave, Amy steps backward to the base of the ruins to snap a picture of the encounter. Suddenly and seemingly without reason, the Mayans change their minds and order the group to climb the ruins. It is here that the group learns the reason for the Mayans' behavior.

Smith's strong characterizations and innovative antagonist make the story work. Smith takes us inside their minds for glimpses into their pasts as well as insight into how they are coping with with the situation as they slowly realize they are being stalked by a sentient, carnivorous vine. The idea of a sentient, carnivorous plant is not quite as far fetched as one might think – a quick look at David Attenborough's The Private Life of Plants will illustrate this – and Smith makes it work Better: he makes the reader believe it by not revealing all right away, instead the plant as antagonist unfolds like a flower unfurling its blossoms. And Smith holds no punches.

Watch for my upcoming review of The Ruins movie.

7.5/10 claws – Don't read this in the garden!

Posted by Alan Smithee in BOOKS, COMICS, AND PUBLICATION REVIEWS, NATURE STRIKES BACK, REVIEWS, 0 comments