Mary Shelley

“I KEEP MY PROMISES!”: The Music of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

“I KEEP MY PROMISES!”: The Music of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

As a child growing up, I was always into the story of order essay go to site how to write a close analysis essay https://naturalpath.net/natural-news/duree-dune-pilule-de-viagra/100/ follow site source link order a paper essay stawka za proofreading how to write a quote in a paper essay cover page creator liquid viagra peptide https://bonusfamilies.com/lecture/cvs-business-plan/21/ help on college application essay source site resume templates for event coordinator how to write a good term paper homework help south american map columbia https://heystamford.com/writing/custom-essays-lab-com/8/ enter writing custom sonar rule thesis on film city dissertation layout pdf business research paper example go here follow site watch unisa doctoral thesis cialis en ecuador grammar essay william helmintoller resume source url Frankenstein. Between the movies and book, it was, and still is, one of my absolute favorite oft-told tales. So on November 4th 1994, during the tenth year of my existence, when Francis Ford Coppola’s production of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was released, I could not have been more excited. 

Made as a companion piece to his earlier film, 1992’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was directed by Kenneth Branagh from a script credited to Steph Lady and Frank Darabont, but was revealed later on to be the product of Branagh, who rewrote it once he came onto the project. Coppola and Darabont have since disowned the final product, as it no longer resembled the original vision they had in mind once Branagh took over, with Darabont going on record to say this about the final version: “the best script I ever wrote and the worst movie I’ve ever seen.”

 

He added: There’s a weird doppelganger effect when I watch the movie. It’s kind of like the movie I wrote, but not at all like the movie I wrote. It has no patience for subtlety. It has no patience for the quiet moments. It has no patience period. It’s big and loud and blunt and rephrased by the director at every possible turn. Cumulatively, the effect was a totally different movie. I don’t know why Branagh needed to make this big, loud film … the material was subtle. Shelley’s book was way out there in a lot of ways, but it’s also very subtle. I don’t know why it had to be this operatic attempt at filmmaking. Shelley’s book is not operatic, it whispers at you a lot. The movie was a bad one. That was my Waterloo. That’s where I really got my ass kicked most as a screenwriter … [Branagh] really took the brunt of the blame for that film, which was appropriate. That movie was his vision entirely. If you love that movie you can throw all your roses at Ken Branagh’s feet. If you hated it, throw your spears there too, because that was his movie.

Now, I love Frank Darabont. But sorry man, I’m on the side throwing the roses. I love this movie. It has been one of my favorites since I first saw, and continues to be such. The direction, the cast, the effects, the cinematography, all truly phenomenal in my opinion. Just an absolutely sumptuous motion picture that Branagh put together.

And one of its greatest attributes is the spellbinding score by Patrick Doyle. Simply speaking, this is one of my all time favorite scores, and one of the finest  I’ve ever heard in my life. This was the score that taught me just how important music can be to a production. Compositions so beautiful, they give me goosebumps while simultaneously moving me to tears. Dazzling, dashing, rousing in every way. An absolute triumph among soundtracks.

I mean, I can go on and on, but there are not enough words in the English language to help me convey just how amazing this score is. So, I’ll leave you with some of my favorite pieces. I wasn’t able to find a complete version of the soundtrack online for streaming (other than on YouTube) but If you really like what you hear, there are a couple of physical copies on Ebay for decent prices. In the meantime, enjoy these picks!

 

 

 

 

Posted by The Cinema Drunkie in GORE OR EXTREME HORROR, HALLOWEEN, HORROR HEROES, Horror Music, HORROR NEWS, Monster Reviews, Monster Villains, MONSTERS AND CREATURES, MOVIE REVIEWS, MUSIC REVIEWS, REVIEWS, SCI-FI HORROR, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, STAFF PICKS, Supernatural, THRILLER, WOMEN IN HORROR, ZOMBIES, 0 comments
Examining WIHM Through the Ladies Of Horror Literature

Examining WIHM Through the Ladies Of Horror Literature

For this article I’m literally examining WIHM through the Ladies Of Horror Literature.

Yes literature, you read that right!

It is so often as fans that we focus our horror love on the films that are created and those that create them. We acknowledge the actors, filmmakers and fundamental crew. However, more than many realize, some of our favorite horror films are born from the amazingly well crafted written word.

Many of these superb dark tales came from the minds of many brilliant women and I’m going to focus on just a few. This will include Mary Shelley, Anne Rice, Shirley Jackson, V.C Andrews, Susan Hill And Daphne Du Maurier.

First up I must start with the grandmother of horror literature herself, Mary Shelley. Shelley is most remembered for her movingly Gothic tale of morality known as Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus. Frankenstein shocked people in its era when released back 0n New Years Day in 1818.

Mary Shelley

The story dived into the ethical dilemmas and left the reader exploring the gruesome topics of body snatching, the reanimating of a corpse created from pieces of several cadavers, and the age old debate of playing God.

It is dark, lengthy, harrowing and over the last 201 years it has inspired so many adaptations, including stage plays, since 1823. It has been both on the big screen (such as Universals 1931 Boris Karloff venture, to the Kenneth Branagh and Robert DeNiro’s 1994 memorable adaptation) and the small screen with shows such as The Frankenstein Chronicles, And Penny Dreadful (which features Victor Frankenstein as a character). It has also had loose adaptations of  memorability such as the musical The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Young Frankenstein (a Mel Brooks parody film),and Tim Burton’s Frankenweenie.

Frankenstein

Like Shelley, Anne Rice is known for her main film adaptation of her most famous novel. This time round the tale was Interview With A Vampire, which is one book in a long running series of the Vampire Chronicles. Based in New Orleans, Rice has become an accomplished author and uses her city as a beautiful back drop for the saga of the Vampire Lestat. The longevity of Rices career focusing on writing about vampires to witches and much more from the darkest realms, has paved the way over the last four decades for the Vampire craze of the last decade in film and television.

Anne rice

Flying across the pond, British novelist Shirley Jackson is a name many won’t know for her brilliant novel We Have Always Lived in the Castle, but mention her classic spooky tale The Haunting Of Hill House and many are more familiar.  The Haunting Of Hill House has been adapted in various ways and several times as a film, focusing on the creepy happenings of Hill House and a party of people there to explore it. It’s lived on with horror fans since the 1963  film ( simply titled The Haunting like its 1999 remake) and has been an inspiration for both serious adaptations , such as a recent Netflix series to even farcical moments in films like Scary Movie 2.

Shirley Jackson

Like Rices Vampire Chronicles, When one mentions V.C Andrews no one can help but recall the twisted and macabre Dollanganger  family of her novel Flowers in the Attic and it’s subsequent novels that followed. Spanning 7 years the books focused on abuse, violence, incest and death and inspired 5 film adaptations over many years. Though the original ending of the 1987 adaptation varied from the novel, no one could dispute actress Louise Fletchers portrayal of the grandmother as one of the most vile villains in horror history. Fletcher herself has spoken time and again about consulting Andrews on the role, to deliver the best performance she could to the viewers and it showed.

V.c.andrews

 

Unlike Andrews English writer Susan Hill is best remembered for her 1983 story of The Woman in Black. Adapted for British Television as a film in 1989, this hauntingly eerie story of the macabre woman in black is sure to give anyone the creeps like it did to me when I watched it at the age of 8. It has since had a remake in 2012 starring Daniel Radcliffe (yes Harry Potter) for Hammer films. That remake has since had a rather foolish sequel that just didn’t work as well following it in 2015 called The Woman in Black: Angel of Death, that was prior made into a novelization in 2013. I implore fans to seek out the book rather than the sequels film. The Woman in Black has also been a successful stage play since 1987 and continues running at theatres globally to this day.

Susan Hill

Finally to round out our literally scream queens I present Daphne Du Maurier. Du Maurier is a name very well known with most horror fans for her popular works of story story fiction have been turned into screen gold time and time again by horror alumni such as Alfred Hitchcock – who adapted her stories Rebecca, Jamaica Inn,And  The Birds. She also had a very successful adaptation of her story Don’t Look Now (AKA Not After Midnight) by Filmmaker Nicholas Roeg. Though the film differs very slightly to the book, Du Maurier was happy with this 1973  adaptation starring Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland And any viewer watching it would easily be as immersed as they were in the book.

Daphne Du maurier

I hope this article helps some horror fans seek out more literature from the horror realm and explore the ladies behind the words of some of your favorite films. The written word is a dying art form and many could do well to examine where our filmmakers get their inspiration.

Posted by Michelle MIDI Peifer in BOOKS, COMICS, AND PUBLICATION REVIEWS, Categories, FEATURED ARTISTS, FEATURED CONTENT, FICTION AND POETRY, HALLOWEEN, HORROR HEROES, HORROR NEWS, IN THE SPOTLIGHT, MONSTERS AND CREATURES, MYTHS AND LEGENDS, PARANORMAL, REVIEWS, SATANIC/DEMONIC, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, STAFF PICKS, THRILLER, TRIBUTE, URBAN DECAY/DYSTOPIAN FUTURES, VAMPIRES, WOMEN IN HORROR, 0 comments
What’s HoTs in Mainstream Horror?

What’s HoTs in Mainstream Horror?

This year has seen many exciting releases cinematically and on DVD / Bluray for horror fans, from the thrilling John Krasinski film A Quiet Place to the latest addition to the Children of the Corn franchise Runaway.

As usual, the genre is so varied and in the coming months, 2018 is set to provide us with even more variety to enjoy on both the big and small screen.

Here’s a sample of what’s to come.

Coming to Cinemas

Mainstream Horror: Slender Man (2018)Cinematically we begin with the release of the long-awaited film Slender Man, On August 24th. Based on the 2011 myth created as part of a competition, the film supposedly investigates that and the resulting case where two 12-year-old girls attempted to murder their friend in the woods, claiming it was because of Slender Man in 2014.
Mainstream Horror: The Little Stranger (2018)The next release will be The Little Stranger, which will hit cinemas on August 31st. Starring Domhall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson, and Charlotte Rampling, this release focuses on a ghost story and is being described as a stylistic thriller set in a big British country house.
Mainstream Horror: The Predator (2018)Many fans will be excited on September 14th, when The Predator is finally released. This newest installment of the franchise is co-written and directed by Shane Black (who actually played Hawkins in the original Predator film back in 1987) and will feature the Predator within suburbia.
Mainstream Horror: Mandy (2018)On September 14th the film Mandy will hit the big screen. Panos Cosmatos directs this film set in 1983 in the wilderness. The film stars Nic Cage and focuses on a supernatural revenge drama, sinister cultists, and demons on motorbikes.
Mainstream Horror: The House with a Clock in Its Walls (2018)The House With A Clock In Its Walls will arrive on September 21st. It is about a 10-year-old boy who awakens the dead, a sleepy town becomes filled with all kinds of interesting and dark creatures. This is Directed by Eli Roth and stars Jack Black, Cate Blanchett, and Kyle McLachlan.
Mainstream Horror: Halloween (2018)October wouldn’t be perfect without the release of the long-awaited return of John Carpenter with his beloved Halloween on October 17th. Following the original release (as a direct sequel), we will pick up 40 years later, with Laurie yet again having a face-off with Michael.
Mainstream Horror: Suspiria (2018)On November 2nd we will see the controversial release, of the long-awaited American remake of Dario Argento’s classic film Suspiria. The film focuses on the darkness that envelopes a dance troupe, focusing on an ambitious young dancer and a grieving psychotherapist. Will fans embrace this remake? Only time will tell.

Coming to DVD and Blu-ray
As for the big DVD and Blu-ray releases coming in the remainder of the year, most will help fans revisit some of the biggest releases of this year so far.

Mainstream Horror: Boar (2017)On August 15th, Australian filmmaker Chris Sun’s Boar is released on DVD and Blu-ray and on demand. For preorders, you can head to Sun’s website for Slaughter FX and secure a copy early. The film is centered on a large boar terrorizing a family and members of a small outback community. It stars Bill Moseley, Nathan Jones, and John Jarratt.
Mainstream Horror: Cargo (2017)On September 5th Cargo will be released.  Cargo features Martin Freeman in this story about the aftermath of a pandemic and one desperate infected father’s struggle to find his infant child and protect her, even from him.
Mainstream Horror: Hereditary (2018)Two weeks later on September 19th, fans will be able to get their own copy of the film Hereditary in stores. It stars Toni Collette in a chilling film about a mother dealing with grief while trying to understand her daughter’s strange behavior. With a mixed reaction at the box office, will fans flock to buy their copy?
Mainstream Horror: Mary Shelley (2017)And finally, on November 14th, we will get the Mary Shelley DVD and Blu-ray release. Starring Elle Fanning, this is a retelling of the story of Frankenstein author Mary Shelley that did quite well at the screenings it had in April and May at various film festivals.
Posted by Michelle MIDI Peifer in COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, NEW RELEASES, 0 comments

WiHM9 Blood Drive, PSA #2 – B[e] Positive

Happy second PSA of Women in Horror Month, Souls! House of Tortured Souls is pround to present the second entry in this year’s Women in Horror Month Blood Drive.

Today’s PSA comes to us from Los Angeles writer/director Joe Magna.

Oh, and before we continue, here’s the obligatory disclaimer (not that we need it, right Souls?):

DISCLAIMER: This IS Horror, boys and grrls, so SOME of these do have VERY naughty content. Blood. Gore. EXTREME gore. Disturbing situations. Nudity. Sexual situations. Violence. Language.
If you are SENSITIVE to this kind of content, be a mature human being and just don’t watch. No need to spoil the fun for us fellow weirdos. We’re not hurting anyone. It just REALLY looks like we are 😉

And without further ado, behold the amazing second Blood Drive PSA of Women in Horror Month:

B[e] Positive

By Joe Magna

MINI BIO:

Joe Magna is a Los Angeles-based Writer & Director, specializing in surreal fantasy and candy-coated nightmares.
Joe’s creative work spans through Television, Film and Theme Park development.
In addition to recently writing and directing the short film “B[e] Positive” for the Twisted Twins’ WIH Massive Blood Drive, Joe Magna will be releasing two additional short films that he wrote and directed, coming soon in 2018.
Joe Magna is currently working in creative development on several Theme Park attractions overseas.

ON WiHM:


I celebrate Women in horror month every month. Without the wonderful women of the horror genre, we would have no Frankenstein [thank you Mary Shelley]. We would have no Creature from the Black Lagoon [thank you Milicent Patrick]. And we would cease to exist.

I think these days more than ever, we need to remind ourselves that each of us emerged bloody and crying from the womb of a brave and strong woman.

It is my pleasure to be a part of this collection of short films that celebrates the wonderful women of Horror.

ON BLOOD DONATION:


Blood is life. It’s in all of us. For most of us, it flows in abundance.
But there are those out there less fortunate.
Donating blood means donating life. Now more than ever, we need to band together to help our brothers and sisters in need.
Not all of us can donate financially. But nearly all of us can donate the fluid of life to help someone else live theirs.
It’s truly in you to give . Thank you for donating blood. Thank you for being a true hero.

CAST & CREW:

Writer, Director, Editor: Joe Magna
Cinematography, Music, Sound Design: Richard Trejo
Production Design: Alex Napiwocki

Starring:
Jill Evyn
Stephanie Gail Williams
Christina Westbrook
and Noel Jason Scott as Harvey Winesnob

Check out the first PSA:

Posted by Alan Smithee in STAFF PICKS, WOMEN IN HORROR, 0 comments
Horror Remakes: Why They Are Not Bad

Horror Remakes: Why They Are Not Bad

Something that weighs on the minds of horror fans every time an announcement of a new movie is coming out, and that one thing is “Will this be a remake”? Now the words reboot, remake, re-imaging, or whatever the wordage may be. These are things that no one likes to hear when you’re a “True” horror fan; however, what makes you a true horror fan? Is it the way we view horror as an art form? Is it the attitude we take towards Michael Bay? Is it the "Robert Englund is the only Freddy" stance? Let’s take a trip through time and explain how re-visioning is how it all started and all the “elite” are not justified in their constant complaining of reboots. Yes, you can have an opinion, but you’re not always right. The fact of the matter is; none of us are right, it’s all perspective of our interests. So allow me if you will, to explain why remakes are essential and going to happen despite all the elitist’s basement dwellers best efforts and internet trolling to stop them.

Nosferatu (1922) / Fair use doctrine.The dawn of the horror age in movies was met with films such as Nosferatu and Phantom of the Opera, both of which were movie adaptations of tThe Phantom of the Opera (1925) / Fair use doctrine.he written word. I’m sure someone in 1929 set in their smoke-filled basement and stated via telegraph “Universal Studios. Stop. The books were better. Stop. Sincerely, Guy you’ll never see.” Then the 1930s come and bring us the Universal Monster films. Again, this was more than likely met with flak from people who read Dracula and Frankenstein and wondered why the movies were nothing like the books. Well, this is considered a re-imaging to adapt to film. Same idea, just a new perspective.

Horror of Dracula (1958) / Fair use doctrine.Throughout the 50s, 60s and 70s all the monsters we loved were re-imagined again in different forms, stories etc. Christopher Lee made Dracula famous again, Peter Cushing put a new twist on the Van Helsing character. We could carry this on but you get the idea. Were these movies met with disgruntled fans of the original Monster movies? Of course, however people of today still give love to Christopher Lee as a horror icon and why? HE WAS IN A REVISION OF FUCKING DRACULA! That is why. These same people complaining about the slasher remakes that were made famous in the 1980’s are the same that have not only the Universal Monsters box set, but the Hammer set right next to it. Have we learned a lesson in horror yet?

Probably not, or you’re looking at your collection thinking it’s a different scenario. It is not, it’s the same concept.

A Nightmare on Elm Street / Fair use doctrine.The slasher and horror remakes of today are no different than those of yesteryear. The remake is essentially laziness on Hollywood running out of ideas but what’s really going on is. They’re burrowing for ideas and then it hits them “Oh, man ya know if I were to make Nightmare on Elm Street, I’d add some backstory it would really help explain a lot of the movie that didn’t make any sense at all in the original”. Well look at that, that’s what, happened. Made more sense and got the story across with a more realistic burned person with boils and all that and not a cheeseless pizza. Not to mention, something that hits the scene “The new Freddy wasn’t funny”. No he wasn’t, and NEITHER WAS THE ORIGINAL! Also “His voice is too deep and creepy.” Ok..um..Horror..mov…ie. Now with that said also, homeboy was burnt up in a fire, his vocal chords probably were soot covered and damaged. I’m sure the writers would issue an apology for realism, but if I were them. I wouldn’t. So, with that said. Let’s take a peek at some other remakes.

Michael BayI’ve read a billion reviews on each, and seeing that Michael Bay was a part of most of them the common thing people say is “Michael Bay sucks, he just blows stuff up.” Ok. Shut up. Without saying that line that EV.ER.Y.ONE says, tell me why Michael Bay sucks. I’ll wait. His movies even Bad Boys were good movies, Transformers was good, as were the Ninja Turtles Movies. Sooo, there’s no justification when everyone says the one thing that does not matter at all on his remakes. I and some of my peers even that I’ve discussed this with have never heard any other reason for Michael Bay to be considered a bad movie maker other than “he blows stuff up”. Which again is all anyone says.

Clancy Brown, Sean Penn, and Robert Lee Rush in Bad Boys (1983) / Fair use doctrine.

Clancy Brown, Sean Penn, and Robert Lee Rush in Bad Boys (1983)

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003) / Fair use doctrine.Texas Chainsaw Massacre: This movie remake was by far the best of them all. It was not only a very well told story, it took out the cheese of the 70s and added a LOT more gore for today’s horror aficionado. It for sure added a lot better of a factor of scare and realism. There was literally nothing wrong with this movie. If you went into it thinking “the original was better” you’re insane because the original lacked in so many ways in comparison. For the time the original was made, yes it was brutal. Someone saw an idea later, and with less restriction, so they made a movie that should have been made in 1970 whatever.
Halloween (2007) / Fair use doctrine.Halloween/H2: Say what you will about Rob Zombie, his movies went from TCM loosely based films, to the remakes of Halloween and Halloween 2, then the not so great films of Lords of Salem and 31, so yes, his originals lack heavily in my opinion, others here love them, but hey we are still friends and it’s no big deal. However, here’s what’s up with Halloween. I hated Halloween by John Carpenter. Halloween II (2009) / Fair use doctrine.That’s right, I dare say such a thing. It was a boring ass movie. No story, just a lot of “oh there’s a guy and now he’s gone.” Rob Zombie added a lot of backstory, a reason for Michael to be the way he is which made a ton more sense to the movie. The rest are pretty much the same as the original except for bloody gore fests right from the beginning. Again, making it far better than the original ever was. Halloween 2 was just bloody which made it fun, other than that it was kind of like a bad dream the whole time. Rob Zombie, really did a bang-up job with his RE-VISION of Halloween probably the best there ever were or ever will be.
Friday the 13th (2009) / Fair use doctrine.Friday the 13th: This film was great, it wrapped the first 7 movies into one. Did we need 45 sequels before? Nope, not at all. So, this summed them all up awesomely. So, this remake was on point with the rest, gave the backstory briefly, burned through 1 and 2…3…4…5. 6..7 in like 2 hours. Killed a ton of people hilariously and boom. Done. This is what made the movie a great rendition to the Slasher remake series. Got to the point, showed some titties, and lots of senseless killing. Without having 8 sequels for no good reason.
Poltergeist (2015) / Fair use doctrine.Poltergeist: Sucked as a movie not because it’s a remake. It was just awful even as a standalone movie. It was, just no.
Evil Dead (2013) / Fair use doctrine.Evil Dead: Seriously, a fantastically remade movie, and it’s undeniable that this movie had some great storyline, the graphics were classic and disgusting. The blood, my lord Vincent Price, the blood was something to be glorious about. If you didn’t like this movie at all, then just take yo’ self out of horror fandom and go to the kiddie booth where you belong.
Bill Skarsgård and Jackson Robert Scott in It (2017) / Fair use doctrine.Okay, we’ll skip a few and move on to IT. With IT being released a lot of folks have stated it looks like crap. What the fuck movie are you watching? Because it was damn good, although the original was the original and Tim Curry blah blah blah. A true-blue horror fan will watch both back to back and be like “Ok the original was fairly boring and far too hokey”. The remake already is instilling pure terror into people. JUST FROM THE TRAILER! which was like “Fuck..this…shit..wow.” Who cares if Tim Curry or John Boy Walton aren’t in it. Who cares if it’s not made for TV and released on 4 VHS tapes. It is a great film, I wasn’t surprised it was great, I was surprised it was hilarious as well as scary.

Like it or not the remakes will continue as people sit around digging up ideas and say “I’d do this differently.” We can’t stop them, we don’t have to watch them. Over the years, I have seen only four remakes not worth a damn and honestly I’ve seen a lot that were really bad so bad I can’t remember them but the movies right off hand I’m speaking of: Poltergeist, Hellraiser, House of Wax and Carnival of Souls. Every other remake has been stupid good, more graphic, more story and a lot better than the original. A Little tidbit to add to this, Evil Dead and Evil Dead 2 *ahem* SAME FUCKING MOVIE! Yes, that’s right same damn movie, can you believe that people say they’re not? Then complain about the remake that was recently made. Look at yourself and wonder why you’re this type of person. Also My Soul to Take Nightmare on Elm Street revision BY WES CRAVEN. If you as a fan paid any amount of attention to Wes Craven’s reasoning and creation of Freddy Krueger you would know that My Soul To Take is taken straight from those interviews, straight from his mind.

So before judging the movie before it comes out. Realize you’re one person with an opinion. Watch the movie as a standalone film and let it fill your heart with joy. We are all horror fans. We all have preferences, and we all have the love of the genre. Dissing on remakes is counterproductive and hypocritical when you have a Bela Lugosi and Christopher Lee posters right next to each other. Vincent Price with the black cat and other Poe stories. I dare anyone to say he didn’t breathe new life into Edgar Allan Poe’s stories. So, all of us can climb off our high horses now and enjoy these damn movies that are more awesome than before. Then in 20 years talk shit about people remaking Insidious and The Conjuring.

Posted by Schock in EDITORIALS, 0 comments