Patrick Wilson

Netflix Releases In The Tall Grass

Today saw the release on Netflix of the Stephen King and Joe Hill film adaptation of the novella In The Tall Grass.

This Netflix adaptation is Directed by Vincenzo Natali. Natali’s fans are familiar with his prior work on films such as Cube, and Splice. Natali also wrote the screenplay, based on the novella.

Screenplay Writer/ Director Vincenzo Natali

The story of In The Tall Grass follows a brother and sister who whilst travelling to San Diego, stop near a mysterious field of extremely tall grass. As they stop they hear a voice crying for help. As they venture into the Tall Grass, the duo realise that all is not as it seems and something lurks within the grass of a sinister nature.

I won’t reveal more, as I really enjoyed it and to aid you in enjoying it I think knowing less is best about the outcome. I will say however that Natali compiles the source material brilliantly, and though the ending differs from the Novella, it’s not disheartening that they changed it.

The film stars Laysla De Oliveira and Avery Whitted as Becky and Cal Demuth.

Laysla De Oliveira as Becky

Laysla De Oliveira is convincing as Becky. She’s expecting her first child and unsure of her future as she travels with her brother to decide the fate of her unborn child (will she keep the baby or put it up for adoption?). As our tormented and exhausted maze runner, Oliveira shows an array of emotions through the film and creates a likeable and engaging character on screen, as Becky. Known for minor television roles, Oliveira is truly coming into her element in In The Tall Grass and her role as Veronica in Guest Of Honor (released last month, and starring David Thewlis and Luke Wilson).

Avery Whitted as Cal

As Becky’s Irish Twin (in the book it’s explained their ages are so close that Becky and Cal are like twins in age), Cal is the more mindful one. Avery Whitted is fresh on the screen, his prior credit only being The Vanishing Of Sidney Hall in 2017. The dramatic mystery starred Elle Fanning, Kyle Chandler, Nathan Lane, And Tim Blake Nelson. As Cal, Whitted gives a notable performance but is still finding his screen presence. We feel for Cal of course but at times I found his performance unconvincing.

Becky’s estranged love interest and baby daddy Travis McKean is played by Harrison Gilbertson. Gilbertson is an Australian actor known for extremely well known prior roles in the recent Picnic at Hanging Rock television series, Leigh Whannel’s Upgrade, Ben Young’s Hounds Of Love, aswell as in films such as Need for Speed, Beneath Hill 60, and Look Away.

Gilbertson is easy to empathise with. When he enters the film, what we are already perplexed by becomes even more elaborate. And it’s Travis who works hard to unravel the Tall grasses mysterious behaviours. Gilbertson does wonderfully to hold certain elements of the film’s encounters together.

Harrison Gilbertson, Laysla De Oliveira, and Avery Whitted

Also starring in In The Tall Grass is Patrick Wilson (who replaced James Marsden after scheduling conflicts) as Ross Humboldt and Will Buie Jr and Rachel Wilson as his son and wife, Tobin and Natalie.

Patrick Wilson as Ross

Wilson is incredibly well known for his roles throughout the last decade in the Insidious, Conjuring, Annabelle and The Nun Films – totalling 7 films (including in the role of Ed Warren, husband of Lorraine Warren the paranormal investigator). Wilson has an impressive body of work over the last two decades and doesn’t let fans down in this film. Stepping away from his usual roles, we get to see a differing side in this performance and he truly makes the film, in a very pivotal role as Ross Humboldt.

Will Buie Jr as Tobin

As Wilson’s son Tobin Humboldt is twelve year old Will Buie Jr. This sharp child actor  has only been acting in films and on television for two years, but his performance in In The Tall Grass is the second most impressive (after only Patrick Wilson’s) in this film. We feel for poor Tobin and we understand his attempts to warn others and avoid the horrors lurking in the Tall Grass. We empathise as the film churns on and we learn more and more about Tobin’s plight, because of Buie’s amazing performance.

Patrick Wilson, Harrison Gilbertson and Laysla De Oliveira

Lastly is Rachel Wilson as Natalie Humboldt. We see less of her in the film than we do of the other five principal cast members, but when she appears she always brings something more about the story with her. This proves her character to be very valuable, and her portrayal as interesting. Wilson is a well known Canadian actress having starred in films such as The Glass House, Saw: The Final Chapter And Hellions.

In the Tall Grass as a whole is a brilliant adaptation of the source material. The creepiness and disillusionment Of each character is strong.

The cinematography is beautiful. Watching each blade of grass wave in the breeze or crane as though listening, reminds one easily of the rows of corn in The Children of the Corn films. The instances of despairing isolation and dizzying bewilderment, cast us back to Kubrick’s take on the Shining in 1980. We get lost in this grassy maze and it’s wonders, both good and bad.

Natali has created an almost perfect film with In The Tall Grass, fans will be impressed by the way it evolves smoothly. As we transition through each scene into the next, until we reach the climax. As I said this differed from the source material. It’s okay. It’s not great but it fits for the film, that’s really all I can say.

Posted by Michelle MIDI Peifer in Categories, 0 comments

What’s Coming and Going on Netflix in October?

Many are already enjoying the delights of Netflix and gearing up for their horror fix through the Halloween month. I won’t be listing everything available through October, but I’m here to let you know some of the most intriguing and fun movies and shows that will be coming and going throughout October on Netflix.

Leaving Netflix in October will be Casper, Cloverfield, Deliverance, Gremlins, Obsessed and The Nightmare. So be sure to get your chance to view them one last time in the next 48hrs.

 

OCTOBER 4th

On October 4th Netflix will be adding Creeped Out season 2, a British/Canadian Horror Anthology tv series focused on creepy stories. This is a great chance to binge watch both seasons, if you haven’t acquainted yourself with it yet.

Also on October 4th comes the release of the adaptation of the Stephen King/ Joe Hill Novella In The Tall Grass. Directed by Vincenzo Natali (Cube, Splice) and starring Patrick Wilson, this is a dramatic mystery sure to thrill fans.

OCTOBER 11th

Japanese Director Sion Sono (Tag) newest film will debut on Netflix on October 11th. Forest of Love is a crime, thriller about a con man serial killer who meets his match.

Also on October 11th we will see the release of Fractured. An American thriller , by director Brad Anderson and starring Australian actor Sam Worthington (Avatar, Terminator Salvation) and Lily Rabe (American Horror Story). The film is a Hitchcockian style thriller, about a man searching for his wife and daughter.

Season two of Haunted appears on Netflix to chill you through October. Season one featured Filmmaker Jason Hawkins (The Blair Witch Legacy) in one episode. It was also the cause of much controversy over an episode of two sisters, claiming their father was a serial killer (Slaughterhouse Episode). Most of us will be curious of what stories will be told this season and will there be more controversial episodes?

OCTOBER 18th

October 18th provides us with Eli. Starring Lili Taylor (The Conjuring, The Haunting) and Directed by  Ciaran Foy (Citadel, Sinister 2) , the plot revolves around a boy who becomes trapped in a house while undergoing treatment for a rare disease.

OCTOBER 24th

Less scary, more humorous comes Daybreak on October 24th. This ten episode dramatic comedy focuses on a Mad Max style apocalyptic scenario and zombies. Starring Matthew Broderick (Ladyhawke, The Cable Guy), this series was adapted from the Brian Ralph graphic novel.

Also on the 24th comes Revenge of Pontianak. This Singaporean/ Malayan language romantic horror uses the south Asian folklore of the Pontianak (a woman who dies with child or during childbirth without a proper funeral, that returns as a vampire). In this film a woman and her village are terrorised by a Pontianaks arrival, as it seeks to take revenge on the guy she loves.

 

OCTOBER 25th

Lastly on the 25th Rattlesnake will be available on Netflix. This psychological thriller is about a woman who saves her daughter after being bitten by a rattlesnake, by taking on the “debt” of killing a total stranger. It is directed by Zac Hilditch (The Final Hours, 1922).

 

For the Younger Viewers this month:

Yes there’s a little spooky fun for the younger crowd within your homes (or even those young at heart),  including some additions to the animated Spooky Monsters with season 3 and Vida’s 1st Halloween Special, On October 4th.

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On the 5th comes the Spooky Tale Of Captain Underpants Hack-O-Ween. Many kids love the adventures of this Underpants clad animated superhero and this instalment is just in time for Halloween.

And finally October 17th introduces The Unlisted, an Australian teen series focused on twelve year old twin boys, who discover that the government is secretly tracking and manipulating the youth via electronic tracking devices.

 

Many horror films and shows already are available on Netflix, so don’t forget during the Spooky season about them too. Happy Halloween viewings. Time for some real Netflix and Chills.

Posted by Michelle MIDI Peifer in Categories, 0 comments

HELLABRATION DELUXE! Thirty-One Days of SHOCKTOBER: Day Twenty-Nine – 10/29/18

10/29 – 2015: BONE TOMAHAWK/GREEN ROOM

A tense tale about the search for a missing woman in the Old West, (BONE TOMAHAWK), and the story of a punk rock band that accepts a gig from Hell (GREEN ROOM). You wouldn’t think these two films had very much in common, and you’d be right. Except that it not only introduced audiences to two remarkable new filmmaking talents, but also gave them two films that went to some unexpected places, redefining what it means to ‘gaze into the abyss’…and see with terrifying clarity, what it is that’s staring back.

S. CRAIG ZAHLER hasn’t been a big part of ‘the scene’, so when BONE TOMAHAWK arrived, it felt kind of like a random lightning strike, and had about the same effect on fans! When you see names like KURT RUSSELL, DAVID ARQUETTE, RICHARD JENKINS, PATRICK WILSON and MATTHEW FOX associated with a film from a relative newbie, you know that script has got to be something special. And it certainly is.  How best to describe this without spoiling the living hell out of it? Okay – for you film buffs out there who go back as far as I do, think THE SEARCHERS-meets-THE HILLS HAVE EYES. For you latter-day movie kids, think DEADWOOD or TOMBSTONE, with just a taste of THE DESCENT thrown in.

When the wife of a small-town settler (WILSON) vanishes, Russell is the sheriff who rounds up a posse to go after her and the people who took her, probably Indians by all the signs. So in the first half of the film, you think that what you’re getting is a modern-day take on a classic kind of Western.  And for the most part, you are.  Then, the second half kicks in.  And I don’t want to say more than that, except keep the smelling salts handy.

For old hands Russell and Jenkins, this is familiar territory, and their roles fit them like old, worn, favorite gloves. Even Arquette doesn’t have to stretch here, his own cameo pretty much an extension of the role he played in the underrated cult classic, RAVENOUS. (And Arquette gets beautiful support from an unexpected cameo by no less than SID HAIG, but I won’t say where or when that happens).

But it’s Matthew Fox who gets the part that’s the most ‘against-type.’ His leading man good looks serve him well, to augment a character you probably could only spend two minutes with before wanting to kill him. It’s quite the revelation.  But not as much as the 180-degree-turn BONE TOMAHAWK makes, into territory that most Westerns wouldn’t even think about going into. This is one of those you’ll be telling your friends about once you’ve seen it, and there are scenes I can promise that will stay with you for a very long time.

On the other side of this, GREEN ROOM is a brilliantly crafted B-thriller with great performances, and a sad footnote, as the movie that pretty much defined the career of the late ANTON YELCHIN, even as he exploded onto the pop culture scene as the “new” Ensign Anton Chekhov in J.J. Abrams’ retooling of the STAR TREK series.

The follow-up to his bracing revenge tale, BLUE RUIN, writer/director JEREMY SAULNIER brings to light the tragic and unsettling tale of a punk band called “The Ain’t-Rights”, composed of Yelchin as “Pat”, along with JOE COLE, CALLUM TURNER and ALIA SHAKWAT as his band mates. Closing out their most recent tour, they were set to do a gig that was arranged by a college boy fan, which fell through without warning.  Stuck with no other options, their benefactor quickly sets up another gig for them.  Out in the middle of nowhere. At a clubhouse.  For neo-Nazi types.

Not the best of circumstances, but money is money and a gig is a gig. Things are pretty dicey from the get-go, and it doesn’t help that the band kicks off their set with a rousing cover of The Dead Kennedy’s classic “Nazi Punks Fuck Off.” Even with that, they do manage to win over the surly crowd. Or so they think.

Retreating back to what passes in this shithole for their “green room”, they’re told not to go in, but someone forgets something in there, and does it anyway. And that’s when they see it: the murdered body of a girl they saw earlier when they were playing in the club.  Things go south fairly quickly, when the skinhead staff trap them inside the room because of what they saw. But two things make it apparent that they probably won’t be allowed to leave alive: when Amber (IMOGEN POOTS), the dead girl’s ‘best friend’ becomes a captive as well, and when the leader of the skinhead cell, Darcy, arrives to take charge of things and “clean up the mess.”  In other words: ‘no loose ends.’

Yet again, we have a script that’s impressive enough to attract an amazing lineup of talent, but especially for the role of the deeply evil Darcy, a complete game-changer for PATRICK STEWART, who said in an interview that when he read the script, the part scared him so badly that he knew he had to do it. Darcy began an arc of parts that Stewart has accepted to change his “Captain Jean-Luc Picard” image, and this was certainly a great way to start.

Every step Saulnier takes with GREEN ROOM proves beyond a doubt, that BLUE RUIN was definitely no fluke, and as a ‘good luck charm’, the cast of ROOM includes the monumentally talented actor/writer/director MACON BLAIR, who was the star of RUIN, and is behind the tremendously dark and funny character piece, I DON’T FEEL AT HOME IN THIS WORLD ANYMORE., made for Netflix. Here in ROOM, Blair has a pretty important role as well as Darcy’s main lieutenant, and that’s about as much as I can say about that.

Bracing, razor-sharp and violent, GREEN ROOM isn’t for the squeamish, and provides some pretty sweet surprises not only for lovers of survival chillers, but mystery lovers as well, as The Ain’t-Rights begin to learn that there’s more than just a case of domestic violence going on behind the scenes.

So that gives you two options of films that gained a lot of traction from word-of-mouth, and rightfully so.

POST-MORTEM SCRYPT: THE WITCH, THE INVITATION, THE VISIT, CRIMSON PEAK, KRAMPUS, THE FINAL GIRLS, INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 3 and GOOSEBUMPS were just some of the movies that gave horror fans a widely diverse selection to choose from, in both quantity and quality, for 2015.

Posted by Samuel Glass in EDITORIALS, FEATURED CONTENT, GORE OR EXTREME HORROR, HALLOWEEN, MONSTERS AND CREATURES, MYTHS AND LEGENDS, OPINION, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, THRILLER, TRIBUTE, 0 comments
House of Tortured Souls – 2016 Horror Awards

House of Tortured Souls – 2016 Horror Awards

We here at The House of Tortured Souls love horror. It’s kind of our jam. And we love to see good horror get recognition. It can be argued that horror is more popular than ever, there are more conventions, festivals, and awards than ever. However, one thing bugged us here at HoTS, and from responses online, we weren’t the only ones. Some awards, not to call names (message me), stretch out the word horror way to far. Seriously Deadpool? Captian America: Civil War? I love me some Cap, and who can talk smack about Ryan Reynolds’ red spandex covered ass, but it’s not FUCKING horror.

So we said “Screw it. Let’s do this”. So here we are with the first annual House of Tortured Souls Awards. Neato huh? We can’t promise we wont make mistakes, can’t promise we don’t stutter step and come in a bit late (I planned to have this April 1st), but we do promise to keep it horror. No super heroes, no Tarzan, and no funny South African robots! What we got? Serial killers, zombies, vampires, ghosts and demons, we got ’em. No there are films that straddle that line of horror/ thriller. We accept that, but repeat after me, no friggin superheros or Jedi.

We are still learning, but we decided to jump in with both feet and stomp the shit out of it. We asked our staff to pick their favorites in a group of categories. Rules are the films have to be originally released in a mass audience format. So feature films released to VoD, DVD, or theater, for the FIRST time in 2016 are eligible. Secondary release to DVD, does not qualify it for 2016. Thus, a film released to theater in 2016 will qualify for 2016. If it is released to DVD in 2017, it would not qualify for 2017.

There is a slight difference for independent films. Since most of them will not get a wide release theatrical release, and it might be years before a VoD or DVD release. For independent films, they may be considered, if they have had a major festival release, are currently (award year) touring the festival circuit, or have a release to VoD, DVD, or theater, AND have not been nominated in a previous year. There’s a logic there as many Indie may tour the festival circuit for a couple years, this allows them a chance to be seen, but not to win multiple years. The HoTS staff will select four nominees per category, in case of an unbreakable tie (which we had a couple of), we may select five nominees in some categories. It’s a work in progress, but we think this is fair.

So without the proverbial further ado, here are the nominees.

Best Horror Movie 2016*

  • Green Room
  • I Am Not A Serial Killer
  • The Witch
  • 10 Cloverfield Lane
  • 31

Best Horror Director 2016

  • Jeremy Saluner – Green Room
  • Andre Overdal – The Autopsy of Jane Doe
  • Roger Eggers – The Witch
  • Rob Zombie – 31

Best Actor Horror 2016

  • John Goodman – 10 Cloverfield Lane
  • Anton Yeltsin – Green Room
  • Patrick Wilson – The Conjuring
  • Richard Brake – 31

Best Actress Horror Movie 2016

  • Mary Elizabeth Winstead – 10 Cloverfield Lane
  • Vera Farmiga – The Conjuring
  • Anja Taylor Joy – The Witch
  • Blake Lively – The Shallows

Best Supporting Actor Horror 2016

  • Stephen Lang – Don’t Breathe
  • John Gallager Jr – 10 Cloverfield Lane
  • Christopher Lloyd – I Am Not A Serial Killer
  • Patrick Stewart – Green Room

Best Supporting Actress Horror 2016

  • Imogene Poots – Green Room
  • Kate Dickey – The Witch
  • Ella – The Monster
  • Madison Wolfe – The Conjuring 2

Best Television Horror

  • Stranger Things
  • Bates Motel
  • Ash versus Evil Dead
  • American Horror Story
  • The Exorcist

Best Actor TV Horror

  • Bruce Campbell – Ash versus Evil Dead
  • Freddie Highmore – Bates Motel
  • Andrew Lincoln – The Walking Dead
  • Alfonso Herrara – The Exorcist

Best actress TV Horror

  • Vera Farmiga – Bates Motel
  • Millie Bobbie Brown – Stranger Things
  • Sarah Paulson – American Horror Story
  • Hannah Kasulka – The Exorcist

Best Supporting Actor TV Horror

  • Jeffrey Dean Morgan – The Walking Dead
  • Ray Santiago – Ash versus Evil Dead
  • Max Theriot – Bates Motel
  • Gaten Matarazzo – Stranger Things

Best Supporting Actress TV Horror

  • Kathy Bates – American Horror Story
  • Lucy Lawless – Ash versus Evil Dead
  • Hannah Kasulka – The Exorcist
  • Olivia Cooke – Bates Motel

Best Indie Horror Movie

  • Circus of the Dead
  • The Barn
  • Plank Face
  • Family Possession

Best Indie Horror Director 2016

  • Billy Pon – Circus of the Dead
  • James Bickert – Frankenstein Created Bikers
  • Justin M Seaman – The Barn
  • Scott Schrimer – Plank Face

Best Indie Actor Horror 2016

  • Parrish Randal – Circus of the Dead
  • Nathan Barret – Plank Face
  • Mitchell Muselino – The Barn
  • Fred Lass – Bubba the Red Neck Werewolf

Best Indie Actress Horror 2016

  • Tristan Risk – Frankenstein Created Bikers
  • Chanel Ryan – Circus of the Dead
  • Susan M Martin – Plank Face
  • Lexi Dripps – The Barn

Best Supporting Actor Horror 2016

  • Bill Oberst – Circus of the Dead
  • Laurence Harvey – Frankenstein Created Bikers
  • Mitch Hyman – Bubba the Redneck Werewolf
  • Will Stout – The Barn

Best Supporting Actress Horror

  • Ellie Church – Frankenstein Created Bikers
  • Alyss Winkler – Plank Face
  • Lizzie Mears – Family Possessions
  • Brigid McCauley – Plank Face

(*Five nominees due to a tie.)

Posted by Allen Alberson in CONTESTS, MONSTERS AND CREATURES, PARANORMAL, SATANIC/DEMONIC, SCI-FI HORROR, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, URBAN DECAY/DYSTOPIAN FUTURES, WOMEN IN HORROR, ZOMBIES, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: The Conjuring 2: The Enfield Haunting

MOVIE REVIEW: The Conjuring 2: The Enfield Haunting

By Dixielord

James Wan returns with a follow up to his hit The Conjuring with The Conjuring 2: The Enfield Haunting. Like the original, The Conjuring 2 is based on a case investigated by Ed and Lorraine Warren, demonologists and paranormal investigators. The Warrens are probably most famous for their investigation of what would become known as The Amityville Horror and the movie based on it. Vera Farmiga (Bates Motel) and Patrick Wilson (The Ruins, Insidious) return to star as The Warrens.

Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson in The Conjuring 2

Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson in The Conjuring 2

The Conjuring was a hit, both at the box office and with horror fans. Sequels, however rarely love up to the original. While I ended up enjoying The Conjuring 2, I do feel it was a step down from the first film. The Conjuring earned its R rating due to a pervasive sense of dread that ran through the entire film, a dark, oppressive feeling that left me uneasy, and made me fear for the main characters, even though I know in real life they survived the incident.

Upside down, the way you turn me The Conjuring 2

Upside down, the way you turn me
The Conjuring 2

The Conjuring 2 never achieved that level of unease. That's not saying it didn't have it's moments. There were scenes, especially involving the kids that were genuinely scary. The possession scene near the end reminded me a lot of Reagan's possession in The Exorcist. But the scenes, especially in the first half of the film were too far and in between to keep that dread going. It needed that to keep me at a heightened sense of unease, to keep me on the edge of my seat. That's when a jump scare really works. It's when all scares really work in a film.

The demonic nun was fun, and I'll admit I jumped a few times with her scenes. She was visually impressive and the effects were well done. However the “crooked man” CGI was really bad. It reminded me of animation from The Wall, or a Monty Python skit. That's not knocking those two properties, both were great in their time, but neither was horror, and it's a good 30 plus years since either s prime. The ending two was a bit of a let down for me. Sorry but as a horror and possession fan, that ending is all too common and clichéd.

But I still enjoyed the film. Mostly because of two reasons. Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson. This was as much a movie about the Warrens, and their scenes made the film. I have a feeling that I like Vera and Patrick's version if the couple more than I would like the real couple. My one real experience with the real Lorraine Warren makes me think she is far more of a religious zealot than her movie counterpart. But I guess when you are dealing with demons from hell, it's best to not be wishy washy about your beliefs.

The real Ed and Lorraine Warren subjects of The Conjuring 2

The real Ed and Lorraine Warren subjects of The Conjuring 2.

Between the love story of the Warrens, and the couple of really bad CGI scenes, there were some good scares. There were some honestly creepy scenes involving the kids, especially Janet ( New Orleans resident Madison Wolfe). It just doesn't hold the fear and tension throughout the entire film.

Janet's just exorcising her rights in The Conjuring 2

Janet's just exorcising her rights in The Conjuring 2.

The Conjuring 2 isn't a bad film, I don't consider it a waste of my money, but as a horror film, it is a bit of a let down. When compared to the original, that let down is even harder. Fans of the Warrens will still want to see it. Fans of Vera and Patrick will really enjoy it, as will casual horror fans who don't like more extreme or unnerving films. But as a scary, disturbing horror film, it fumbles pretty hard. Unless you are a real fan of the Warrens, or more so Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson, wait till it hits Linnet.

Posted by Allen Alberson in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Bone Tomahawk (2015)

MOVIE REVIEW: Bone Tomahawk (2015)

By Dixielord

Usually when I get excited for a movie it leads to disappointment, so I went into Bone Tomahawk with some trepidation. However, this is one of those rare times that I walked away happy. Bone Tomahawk is everything it promised. Horror films that flirt with the Western genre don't have a great track record, there are a few good ones like High Plains Drifter, but many more that just don’t cut it, like Gallows Walker and The Killing Box. Bone Tomahawk is one of the good ones, one of the best.

Kurt Russell in Bone Tomahawk

Kurt Russell in Bone Tomahawk

In Bone Tomahawk, a pair of murderous thieves, played by Sid Haig and David Arquette, inadvertently lead a tribe of cannibalistic troglodytes back to a peaceful western community. There they kidnap several townspeople in the middle of the night. The next morning the Sheriff (Kurt Russell) leads a small but determined posse in an attempt to get them back. The posse includes Matthew Fox (Lost) as a local gunman and Indian fighter, Richard Jenkins (Burn After Reading) as back up deputy Chicory, and Patrick Wilson (The Conjuring), whose wife was taken by the cannibals. But the trail to the missing townspeople may be as dangerous as the troglodytes themselves.

Bone Tomahawk does so many things right. It's a horror movie, but it is also a legitimate western. You can completely remove the horror tag, and western fans will be able to enjoy it. The horror aspect doesn't really kick in till over half way into the film. There are a few brutal scenes early on, but I was beginning to believe it was going to be simply a cowboy film. Then the posse makes it to the cave of the troglodytes.

Bone Tomahawk

Bone Tomahawk

Dear people talking about how extreme the gore was in The Green Inferno, check out Bone Tomahawk. While scene for scene it might not contain as much gore, Bone Tomahawk is more squirm-inducing than The Green Inferno. There is one scene that looks incredibly real and it looks to be all practical effects. You want a hard to watch kill scene? Watch Bone Tomahawk.

And it's not just gore that makes this film work. Russell is excellent as an aging sheriff. He might not be as fast, or as smart as some of the members of the posse, but he is determined, honorable (to a fault at times), and wise. He's also tired, and you can see the weight of the bad decisions on his face. He seems to know this is his last hurrah and he will save his people, even if he doesn't come back alive.

Matthew Fox's character is almost immediately unlikeable. Along the trail we learn about his history, and why he hates Native Americans. He becomes a valuable asset, and by the end I had actually developed some respect for him.

Patrick Wilson ends up being the most unlikely hero of them all. Shackled with a bad leg, that's getting worse along the way, he still plays a major part in the resolution. His wife (Lili Simmons) is one of the townspeople kidnapped by the trogs, and he will die to get her back. It is slightly telegraphed that he is going to “save the day” and while logically it might seem contrived, it never feels that way in the film. Instead of shaking my head and laughing, I was cheering him and the rest of the posse on.

On of my favorite characters was Richard Jenkins as Chicory. He is almost a stereotypical western deputy, but it works perfectly. He's fiercely loyal to Sheriff Hunt and determined to follow him into danger. He adds a lot to the western feel. He's a throw back to great western characters like Pea in Lonesome Dove and Mose in The Searchers. There isn't a lot of humor in Bone Tomahawk, but most of it is provided by Jenkins.

One of the things I most disliked about The Green Inferno was the injection of humor into the film. The cannibal films that The Green Inferno paid homage too weren't funny. They were brutal, depressing, and dark. It's almost Eli's calling card to inject humor into his gore fests. It works at times, but with Bone Tomahawk, director S. Craig Zahler (in his directorial debut) plays it straight, with no silly comedy or fart jokes. There are some small humorous moments, but they are all natural and develop from the characters, mostly Chicory’s personality.

Bone Tomahawk takes it time developing. It's a bit of a slow burn as the posse takes time to get to its destination, but it's never boring. The group of would be heroes face adversity every step. There's a run in with bandits that leaves the men on foot. There are battles not only with the horse thieves but with themselves, and with the infection raging in Wilson's leg. The trek there also gives them time for character development that seems natural and unforced. It might be slow, but it is never boring.

Some people may claim it isn't really horror, but it contains suspense, murder, cannibalism, and on screen gore. It's a horror movie. Maybe it's not supernatural, but it's horror. And it's also a legitimate western. I just love this film, no holds barred and no reservations. It is a slow burn, but it isn't boring and the pay off is totally worth it. I give Bone Tomahawk my highest rating, 10 out of 10.

Bone Tomahawk's Kurt Russell, Matthew Fox and Richard Jenkins

Kurt Russell, Matthew Fox, and Richard Jenkins in Bone Tomahawk

Posted by Allen Alberson in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments

COMING SOON: Bone Tomahawk (2015)

Dixielord

Kurt Russell in Bone Tomahawk

Western horror movies are a somewhat rare thing, especially good ones. This Halloween, the genre gets a new entry with Bone Tomahawk, which will also bring Kurt Russell back into the horror genre. Russell is popular with horror fans from his starring role in John Carpenter's classic The Thing, as well as Carpenter's not quite horror, but still classics Escape From New York and Big Trouble in Little China. Bone Tomahawk won't be Russell's only dip into the western genre this year. December will see the release of Quentin Tarantino's Hateful Eight which will also star the former Snake Plisken.

Bone Tomahawk will be the directorial debut of writer/director Craig Zahler. The cast, along with Russell will include Patrick Wilson, David Arquette, Matthew Fox, Sean Young and horror icon Sid Haig. Timothy Olyphant and Jennifer Carpenter were originally set to star in the project but have since dropped out, replaced by Russell and Lili Simmons.

Kurt Russell and Sid Haig in Bone Tomahawk

Kurt Russell in Bone Tomahawk

Bone Tomahawk is set in the 1800s on the border between Texas and Mexico. It tells the story of a small town raided by a group of “cannibalistic troglodytes.” The cannibals kidnap several townspeople, and a posse, led by Russell, sets out to rescue them.

Just on the surface the film bears a passing resemblance to The 13th Warrior, with cannibals attacking a small town, and a group of warriors going in pursuit. The 13th Warrior was in itself based on the classic tale of Beowulf and Grendel. Whether or not this is just a surface resemblance we won't know until it releases next month.

The movie will world premiere September 25 at Fantastic Fest, and will screen at the London Film Festival October 15, 2015. Bone Tomahawk will is set for a limited theatrical release on October 23, 2015 just in time for Halloween.

Halloween is going to be a sweet time for Horror fans with The Green Inferno opening late September, Crimson Peak in October as well as Bone Tomahawk. And you can never go wrong with Sid Haig being back on the big screen.

Posted by Allen Alberson in COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, 0 comments