Poltergeist

A CREEPY COLLECTOR’S GUIDE TO SCARY SOUNDTRACKS – “STARTER EDITION”

A CREEPY COLLECTOR’S GUIDE TO SCARY SOUNDTRACKS – “STARTER EDITION”

 

As a deep-dish fan with a love for all things horror, I’ve been collecting certain kinds of memorabilia in “serious” mode since about 1997, if memory serves me correctly. From posters, tee shirts, celebrity autographs and from candid snapshots to professional photo-ops, I’ve amassed quite a bit of “swag.” But it’s easy to say that nothing gives me greater pleasure than my collection of horror film soundtracks – be they on vinyl, CD or some other medium. (And I still do have some of them on cassette. Yep, this hobby for me goes back click autocad drafter phoenix az resume the jungle essay customs eldar essay jrr law tolkien good expository essay thesis national rural youth service corps essay i need help writing a research paper dissertation binding telford https://creativephl.org/pills/how-to-buy-cheap-generic-viagra/33/ get link https://grad.cochise.edu/college/thesis-statement-examples-identity/20/ source url college essays for sale click here http://www.naymz.com/best-creative-writing-undergraduate-programs-uk/ best essay writing sites xanax and prednisone https://worldtop20.org/system/essay-rubrics-high-school/30/ go to site enter source how to forward multiple email on iphone enter dissertation template good hook for essay go to site http://belltower.mtaloy.edu/studies/professional-essay-writer-service/20/ here professional writing services company thesis vs dissertation meaning help save earth essay common app essay samples 2018 that far.)

Fair warning given now – as in most things pared down to “lists”, this is not at all an objective collection I’m about to outline here. But in all of the years of collecting and enjoying horror movie orchestral and song scores, the ten albums I’m going to mention are the ones that seem to be where I have experienced the most ‘overlap’, when I get into discussions with fellow fans about what the great soundtracks are in genre films. None of these are ‘rarities’; they’re all still fairly easy to obtain from Amazon, eBay, Intrada, Mondo, or whoever your favorite purveyor of collectible music is.  Here they are: the Ten Basic Scream-Worthy Soundtracks that any budding collector should have, to start a well-grounded, basic horror film music collection…

In no particular order (think of this less as a ranking list and more of a shopping list):

PSYCHOBernard Herrmann, composer

 

The Alfred Hitchcock movie that began the Sixties, by forever breaking the horror mold and establishing its own set of rules, proved to be no different with its score. Herrmann’s string section shrieking in horror at the complete out-of-left-field demise of the lead damsel-in-distress, would be imitated in countless horror films to come…but never quite duplicated in terms of the impact this work made upon not just movies, but popular culture overall.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMTrVgpDwPk

ALIENJerry Goldsmith, composer

When you’re speaking of master composers in the genre field, very few have contributed to it as indelibly as Jerry Goldsmith has. One of the most versatile composers in the business, who wrote for practically every kind of picture imaginable, just about nobody did it better when it came to horror or sci-fi than he, and Ridley Scott’s ALIEN gave Jerry and all of us the best of both.
Notoriously finicky about his accompanying scores, Scott actually discarded a lot of Goldsmith’s original score for this deep-space tale of dread and death, opting to use in some spots, bits and pieces of music he liked from Jerry’s scores for a couple of other films that had nothing to do with horror. Nevertheless, enough of the music written expressly for the film was still included, and the result still remains to be probably the second best piece of work he ever did for a genre film. What do I think the first one was? Stay tuned, kids…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ftsJoR1Jys

A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (1984 version)Charles Bernstein, composer

Following the monstrous success of TUBULAR BELLS, the album created by brilliant multi-instrumentalist Mike Oldfield, of which director William Friedkin used but a snippet from for his iconic chiller, THE EXORCIST, every Tom, Dick and ‘Freddy’ wanted a soundalike theme for their project, to help guarantee its success. Every guy with a pen and a couple of reams of sheet music tried their hand at it, and some of them were more successful than others. Charles Bernstein, of the illustrious musical Bernstein clan, had something a little different in mind. Using the  creepy, sing-songy jump rope melody that became the picture’s signature jingle, what he managed to create was – rather than a slavish knockoff of the Oldfield tune – a theme and accompanying score that was as eerie, surreal and uneasily compelling as the film it anchors; “’An ABC Afterschool Special’ gone very, very wrong…” (The best comment I ever read describing the film in a critic’s review.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxU8veeydI4

THE LOST BOYSThomas Newman, composer; Various Artists

The Eighties. The definitive era when songs for soundtracks were commissioned by movie music supervisors, specifically from groups who were hot at the time, or groups and artists who were angling to get into that spotlight. A separate list could be devoted to these song scores alone (and maybe there will be one in the not-too-distant future, hint-hint), but one of the most popular and well-known of these albums is the one that goes with Joel Schumacher’s too-cool-for-ghouls teen vamp epic, that tossed around contributions from sources as diverse as Echo And The Bunnymen, The Who’s lead frontman Roger Daltrey and super-hot Aussie band INXS teamed up with soul-shouter Jimmy Barnes. But what nobody saw coming, was a little tune penned by singer/songwriter Gerard McMann (now known as “G Tom Mac”), which rapidly became a moody, synth-laden Goth anthem for all things lyrically ‘vampirical,’ “Cry, Little Sister.” More than amply covered by too many bands to count, it has become its own darkly delicious standard.  All this, and a not-to-be-discounted moody-yet-menacing score by Thomas Newman (of that other famed Hollywood musical family), which only has one cut featured on this collection (“To The Shock Of Miss Louise”), sad to say, and which hasn’t ever been released on its own well-deserved disc, to my knowledge. But for now, there’s enough Eighties nostalgia here to keep your ears busy as it is.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raI38f_xMZE

THE OMEN (1976 version)Jerry Goldsmith, composer

Remember when I said that Jerry could do anything? He proved it, time and again with scores as wide-ranging as PATTON, OUR MAN FLINT, PLANET OF THE APES, THE BLUE MAX, the list goes on for what feels like forever. And yet, with all of the acclaim and the Oscar nods he received over the years, how ironic was it that the one time he actually managed to finally grab a Little Gold Man, he had to pen a literal Black Mass To Satan in order to do it?

You heard me. That’s pretty much what the score to Richard Donner’s demonic terror trip was: a Black Mass honoring the Horned One. And every spine-freezing note of that theme and the attendant dark dramatic cues that follow it are what provide the film with its heft, along with the leading performances of Gregory Peck and Lee Remick. Goldsmith would go on to do even more iconic genre work with POLTERGEIST and GREMLINS, but this is the one that is as associated with him, as another memorable score from a contemporary of his is with his name…betcha can’t guess who that is!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nj4o1xhkbG4

JAWSJohn Williams, composer

The low bass string notes hum…the lower end of the piano kicks in, followed by the primitive, threatening drum beats…then those horns start…

Even people who don’t collect horror themes as a whole have this baby in their collections…the score that kept people out of the water in beaches worldwide for YEARS. And with good reason. And yet its popularity resulted in the sale of millions of copies, making it one of the most successful film scores ever to hit the record store stacks.  Not known for horror scores per se (and he did a beautiful job on his one recognizable piece with the London Symphony Orchestra, for Brian De Palma’s psychokinetic suspense thriller, THE FURY), no other composer scared the holy hell out of audiences more effectively, by evoking the feeling of a threat that couldn’t even be seen for the majority of the movie.  Known primarily for his other work with Steven Spielberg, as well as magnificent dramatic and action scores for a wide range of directors (check out his matchless theme for Irwin Allen’s production of THE TOWERING INFERNO), Williams scoring for JAWS (and THE FURY) was indelibly etched into the minds of movie fans for generations to come.

SUSPIRIA (1977 version) GOBLIN, composers/performers

Remember what I said before about knockoffs of TUBULAR BELLS? Some composers managed to take the feel of that timeless theme and create something that felt completely unique, while others just “went with the flow” and cranked out something that sounded just like it. For Dario Argento’s giallo-esque witchy thriller, the famed art-rock troup Goblin managed to steer their work more towards the former category. As much a character in the film as the stunning visuals it supports, this crazy kaleidoscope of bells, hissing voices, exotic percussion and keening synths are almost a required must-have for any serious collector, even if they’ve never laid eyes on the film. (And if you haven’t yet…why the hell not???)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SI7SYh47Ak

HALLOWEEN (1978 version)John Carpenter, composer

Whenever the subject of iconic, recognizable genre themes comes up, PSYCHO, JAWS, A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET and THE OMEN always turn up on “the usual suspects” list. But that list would hardly hold water without the inclusion of one of the simplest, yet strikingly effective themes in horror history. Whether Carpenter heard Oldfield’s EXORCIST theme or not is debatable. Based on the 5/4 time signature he remembered using for percussion practice in his younger years, he managed to craft a leitmotif that, like JAWS, is so catchy and obsessively, memorably creepy yet rudimentary, that even someone with no musical knowledge or talent whatsoever can plink it out on the keys of any piano, and just like JAWS, a fan will recognize it immediately, even if they can’t quite remember where it comes from. That is a credit to Carpenter’s talent for composition – keeping it simple and also frighteningly memorable. A talent he would display through a raft of pictures that have scared and delighted us for years since.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0rSZfDJxpI&list=PL7v_KFM4xhO2ESrrIA9_Y_Hz7qKtq_ssj

FRIDAY THE 13TH (1980 original)Harry Manfredini, composer

Hewing closer to Herrmann’s work on PSYCHO as an obvious influence, Harry Manfredini wasn’t a name known very widely to mainstream horror fans, when this “cabin-in-the-woods” touchstone suddenly took the world by storm, and changed all that. Whether you think the echoing hook of the theme sounds like “ch-ch-ch-ha-ha-ha” or “ki-ki-ki-ma-ma-ma” (and the backstory on THAT debate is one of the most interesting and hilarious in horror movie music history), Manfredini’s inspired choice to use the echoey hook to set the score apart was nothing less than genius. You can’t even mention the name “Jason Voorhees” without people imitating their own preferred version of that cue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-RjwlplnGg&list=PL7v_KFM4xhO3kSu_dB45ubseBGPzq-qLb

CARRIE (1976 original)Pino Donaggio, composer

It was Brian De Palma’s third studio-affiliated picture, and his last chance to get it right, as his other two films (GET TO KNOW YOUR RABBIT for Warner Brothers and PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE for Fox) had tanked at the box office. CARRIE, based on the blockbuster novel by then-burgeoning sensation Stephen King, was to feature De Palma’s favorite musical collaborator, Bernard Herrmann for the score. Unfortunately, after composing and recording his final masterpiece, the score for Martin Scorsese’s TAXI DRIVER, Herrmann passed away.  Stuck without a composer, De Palma was still searching when he attended a screening of the Nic Roeg psychic chiller, DON’T LOOK NOW. Immediately blown away by the score, he made some calls to find out who the composer was. That call led to a long-term association with Donaggio that began with CARRIE and lasted all the way through virtually every movie he made until BODY DOUBLE.
Donaggio’s score for this unforgettable tale of one girl’s ‘coming-of-rage” works on every level, because of how, in the maestro’s own words, he didn’t write the music for a “horror film”, but rather as if he were writing passages for a “tragic opera.” Which evokes all of the anger, heartbreak, pathos and horror of De Palma’s instinctively accurate translation of Lawrence D. Cohen’s adaptation. Another one that should be in every horror fan’s music collection.

Posted by Samuel Glass in Categories, EDITORIALS, FEATURED CONTENT, HALLOWEEN, Horror Music, HORROR NEWS, MUSIC REVIEWS, OPINION, REVIEWS, SATANIC/DEMONIC, SCI-FI HORROR, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, THRILLER, 0 comments
Poltergeist—To be Remade *Again*

Poltergeist—To be Remade *Again*

“They’re hereeeeee!” Marvel directors Joe & Anthony Russo are waking up MGM’s burial ground after the 2015 remake of Spielberg’s and Tobe Hooper’s classic film, Poltergeist

This remake is produced by the two filmmakers who are behind Marvel’s films such as Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Captain America: Civil War, Avengers: Infinity War, and Avengers: Endgame.

With Marvel movies under their belt, I am curious to see what direction they will take this supernatural horror film. Hopefully, more news will come out soon. If you have any thoughts or comments, I want to read them. 

Posted by Sarah Gregory in COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, PARANORMAL, PREQUELS AND SEQUELS, REMAKES AND REBOOTS, 0 comments
In Remembrance:  Tobe Hooper

In Remembrance: Tobe Hooper

Tobe Hooper didn’t just change the face of horror, I credit (or blame, depending on who you talk to) him with changing the direction of my life. I don’t say that lightly. Not many movies or directors have impacted me as much as his films.
I grew up during the video rental craze of the 80s. I also grew up in a house where horror wasn’t a popular genre. So anytime we went to the local video rental place, I would always browse the horror section looking at all the boxes of all the movies that I would rent if only my mom would let me.
Not too many of those boxes stood out or left a lasting impression on me. Except two. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre was the first of those two. It was like the Holy Grail of horror movies in my opinion. Even when my parents started letting me rent scary movies, they always told me “No” when it came to that one. I still remember the first time I got the okay to rent The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. It was a defining moment in my young, impressionable life. It also changed my life forever.
Up until that point I had not seen a lot of horror, and a lot of what I had seen was pretty straightforward stuff. Universal classics, 70s Hammer horror, and Roger Corman cheapies. I had no idea what I was getting into when I popped in the video tape after everyone else in the house had gone to bed.
This was the first movie that caught me by surprise. It blew me away. I had never seen anything like that before. The brutality and the stark tone set it apart from anything I had ever seen before. I remember rewinding and re-watching scenes over and over. For a movie with very little blood, it came across as one of the most gut-wrenching watches I had seen up until then.
That was the moment I knew that I wasn’t going to just be a fan of horror. I was going to be one of those “horror people”.
After that, I knew I had to seek out the other works of Mr. Hooper. I watched every single one I could find. Poltergeist and Salem’s Lot both left lasting impressions on me. The Fun House and Lifeforce were enjoyable and interesting. But nothing seemed to grab my attention with the same force as the original The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.
It’s a fair bet that no movie will ever have the same impact on me as The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. And as much as I wanted to discuss how much I loved Poltergeist and The Apartment Complex, I really don’t think anything I could say will compare to how I feel about that one film.
Although I never met the man, I feel as though his contribution to entertainment helped shape who I am. His legend and legacy will live on in all of the filmmakers that continue to be inspired by his work.
Posted by Richard Francis in EDITORIALS, HORROR HEROES, 0 comments
In Remembrance: Tobe Hooper

In Remembrance: Tobe Hooper

Tobe Hooper: Gone But Not Forgotten

It is with heavy heart that we report the passing of the ever so great Tobe Hooper - the man who brought us many, MANY great horror flicks, such as The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, Poltergeist, The Fun House, Lifeforce, Salem's Lot, and Toolbox Murders - among others. His legacy of horror films are what spawned fear and intrigue on several levels for all of us here at House of Tortured Souls. We will be paying tribute to him, so stay tuned to find out how his work has influenced our work and our lives.
Here's a list of his directorial credits alone:

  • Djinn (2013)
  • Destiny Express Redux (2009)
  • Masters of Horror (TV Series) – “The Damned Thing” (2006)
  • Masters of Horror (TV Series) – “Dance of the Dead” (2005)
  • Mortuary (2005)
  • Toolbox Murders (2004)
  • Taken (TV Mini-Series) (1 episode) – “Beyond the Sky” (2002)
  • Night Visions (TV Series) (2 episodes) – “Cargo” (2002)
  • Night Visions (TV Series) (2 episodes) – “The Maze” (2002)
  • Crocodile (Video) (2000)
  • The Others (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Souls on Board” (2000)
  • Dark Skies (TV Series) (1 episode) – “The Awakening” (1996)
  • Nowhere Man (TV Series) (2 episodes) – “Turnabout” (1995)
  • Nowhere Man (TV Series) (2 episodes) – “Absolute Zero” (1995)
  • The Apartment Complex (TV Movie) (1999)
  • Prey (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Hungry for Survival”: Unaired Pilot (1998)
  • Perversions of Science (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Panic” (1997)
  • The Mangler (1995)
  • Body Bags (TV Movie) (segment “Eye”) (1993)
  • Night Terrors (1993)
  • Tales from the Crypt (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Dead Wait” (1991)
  • Haunted Lives: True Ghost Stories (TV Mini-Series documentary) (1 episode) – “Ghosts R Us/Legend of Kate Morgan/School Spirit” (1991)
  • I’m Dangerous Tonight (TV Movie) (1990)
  • Spontaneous Combustion (1990)
  • Freddy’s Nightmares (TV Series) (1 episode) – “No More Mr. Nice Guy” (1988)
  • The Equalizer (TV Series) (1 episode) – “No Place Like Home” (1988)
  • Amazing Stories (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Miss Stardust” (1987)
  • The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986)
  • Invaders from Mars (1986)
  • Lifeforce (1985)
  • Billy Idol: Dancing with Myself (Video short) (1983)
  • Poltergeist (1982)
  • The Fun House (1981)
  • Salem’s Lot (TV Movie) (1979)
  • The Dark (replaced by John Cardos, uncredited) (1979)
  • Eaten Alive (1976)
  • The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
  • Eggshells (1969)
  • The Heisters (Short) (1964)

Now, pop in a classic, grab your favorite snack, and celebrate the scares that he gave us.

Poster Gallery of Some of Tobe Hooper's Films

Click for larger image.

Posted by Schock in TRIBUTE, 0 comments
HISTORY OF HORROR: JUNE

HISTORY OF HORROR: JUNE

By John Roisland & Woofer McWooferson

Join House of Tortured Souls as we celebrate significant dates in the history of horror in June.

June 1 – 7

June - Phantasm

 

06/01/1979
Phantasm released theatrically

June - Poltergeist (original)

 

 

06/04/1982
Poltergeist released theatrically

June - Robert Englund

 

06/06/1949
Robert Englund (A Nightmare on Elm Street actor) born

June - The Omen (remake)

 

06/06/2006
The Omen (remake) released theatrically

June 8 – 14

June - Hostel 2

 

06/08/2007
Eli Roth’s Hostel Part II released
theatrically

June - Damien: Omen II

 

06/09/1978
Damien: Omen II
released theatrically

June - Poltergeist III

 

 

06/10/1988
Poltergeist III released theatrically

 

June - Tales from the Crypt (original)

06/10/1989
Tales from the Crypt premiers on TV

June - Rosemary's Baby

 

06/12/1968
Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby released theatrically

June - Jason Voorhees

 

06/13/1946
Fictional mass
murderer
Jason Voorhees is born

June 15 – 21

June - Herschell Gordon Lewis

 

06/15/1929
Herschell Gordon Lewis (Blood Feast, The Wizard of Gore) actor, filmmaker, and Godfather of Gore born
June - Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein

 

06/15/1948
Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein released theatrically
June - Gremlins 2: The New Batch

 

06/15/1990
Gremlins 2: The New Batch released theatrically

 

June - Psycho

06/16/1960
Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho released theatrically
June - Jaws 2

 

06/16/1978
Jaws 2 released theatrically

June - Lucio Fulci

 

06/17/1927
Lucio Fulci
(The Beyond,
City of the Living Dead
writer, director) born

June - The Exorcist II: The Heretic

 

06/17/1977
Exorcist II: The Heretic released
theatrically

June - Willard

 

06/18/1971
Willard released
theatrically

June - Haute Tension

 

06/18/2003
Haute Tension
released theatrically in France

June - Daria Nicolodi

 

06/19/1950
Daria Nicolodi (Dario Argento’s Opera actress) born

 

June - The Twilight Zone06/19/1964
The Twilight Zone original TV series ends its run

June - Jaws

 

06/20/1975
Jaws released theatrically

June - Frenzy

 

06/21/1972
Frenzy released
theatrically
June - Lifeforce

 

06/21/1985
Lifeforce released theatrically

June 22 – 28

June - Bruce Campbell

06/22/1958
Bruce Campbell (The Evil Dead (1981), Army of Darkness actor) born

June - Elvira's Haunted Hills

 

06/23/2001
Elvira’s Haunted Hills released
theatrically

June - Land of the Dead

 

06/24/2005
George A. Romero’s Land of the Dead released theatrically

June - The Omen (original)

 

06/25/1976
The Omen released theatrically
June - The Thing

 

06/25/1982
John Carpenter’s The Thing released theatrically

 

June - Peter Lorre06/26/1904
Peter Lorre (The Comedy of Terrors
actor) born

June - Dark Shadows

 

06/27/1966
Dark Shadows premiers on TV

June - Blade the Series

 

06/28/2006
Blade: The Series premiers on TV

June 29 – 30

June - The War of the Worlds (remake)

 

06/29/2005
War of the Worlds released theatrically

June - Vincent D'Onofrio

 

 

06/30/1959
Vincent D’Onofrio (The Cell actor) born

 

Keep it Evil

Posted by John Roisland in HORROR HISTORY, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Poltergeist (2015)

MOVIE REVIEW: Poltergeist (2015)

They're Here...

And if you're a fan of the original, it's going to piss you off

By Amy Mead

Poltergeist poster

Directed by Gil Kenan

Starring Sam Rockwell, Rosemarie Dewitt, Kennedi Clemens, Jared Harris, Jane Adams and Saxon Sharbino

The Bowens are a family of five, consisting of Mom (Amy), Dad (Eric), and three kids (Kendra, Griffin, and Madison). They move into a new suburban home due to some financial woes and the children do not seem pleased about it. Meanwhile, Eric and Amy appear as though they are under a great deal of stress.

Almost immediately strange things begin happening within their new home. Strange noises in the walls, the electricity keeps flickering, cell phones are burning out, and there are "people" appearing in the TV talking to the youngest member of the family, little Madison. The whole family wakes up and Madison announces that "They" are here and the family soon discovers that the cemetery was "moved" when their subdivision was built, which of course, it wasn't. Their house does indeed rest upon the unmoved bodies, but they don't know that. Yet.

Shortly after moving into their new home, Eric and Amy attend a dinner party one night, leaving the three children at home, and in short order, Madison is lured to her bedroom closet and taken by unseen entities, clown dolls are coming to life, and trees are attacking poor Griffin, while a viscous goo seeps out of the floor, sprouting hands and attacking Kendra. It seems as though the attacks were a diversion by the spirits so that they would be able to get to Madison alone and lead her into the spirit world with them. Eric and Amy return home to find Madison missing and, after hearing her voice emanating from within the television, the family are forced to seek help from paranormal experts to find out if there is a way to get Madison back to her family where she belongs.

If you've seen the original, you pretty much know the rest, and how it all shakes out for the most part...

Poltergeist 2015 is an extremely watered down version of the beloved Tobe Hooper classic from 1982, that had almost no scares, thrill, or apprehension to it whatsoever. The scares are weak and seriously lacking in tension. It's almost as if the producers were holding so fast to that precious PG-13 rating that they forgot there was supposed to be a certain element of fear involved, making for a far less dramatic impact. I felt like there was no art behind it, they were just here for the cash cow that remakes invariably seem to be.

The acting is pretty much the only thing that wasn't a complete let down in Poltergeist 2015. There were some damn good performances, particularly from the younger cast members, ALMOST making it worth a one time watch. ALMOST.

I am not usually a remake snob and am generally willing to give almost anything a chance...This is one where I wished I hadn't watched it at all, let alone for $7.99 on VOD. But watch it I did, and I fucking HATED it. I should have known better, but for whatever reason (I think it must have been due to Sam Raimi's involvement), I had to see how big of a trainwreck it was. And holy shit, was it ever. I still want my time and money back and it's been a week.

There was nothing about this film that resonated with me in any way, shape, or form. Even going in expecting next to nothing, I was still a bit disappointed. One of the reasons I don't bitch too much about the endless stream of remakes is because I believe that they have the potential to gain the original films new followers. This version was so extremely unentertaining that I just don't see that happening.

Give me the brilliant Tobe Hooper version over this pointless, steaming pile of crap any day of the week. It's the only one worth watching.

I give this one 3/10 and that's only because I crush on Sam Rockwell and I am in a good mood.

Posted by Alan Smithee in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments