slow burn

Housewife

Housewife

After watching Housewife by Turkish director Can Evrenol  (Baskin) two things are apparent, one this is definitely not Baskin and two this is a far more serious attempt at filmmaking. I love Baskin and went into Housewife expecting something similar, while I was mildly disappointed to find it was completely different I was also impressed with the stark contrast in style. It should be noted that I usually watch and review extreme cinema and that is where my passion lies, but I want to give my best unbiased opinion on this one. 

Housewife starts in the childhood home of our main character Holly. The opening scene is Holly and her sister Hazel playing until Hazel gets her first period. Holly scared and not understanding what is happening screams for their mother (Defne Halman) an over zealous fanatic who whisks Hazel away quickly to “tend” to her. A great tragedy befalls the family that night resulting in loss of life and repressed memories.

Now fast forward to adulthood filled with regret, mediocre sex and an unhealed past. Holly (Clementine Poidatz) not fully recovered from the events that took place so many years ago still experiences it’s lingering effects. Things change quickly when a long lost friend Veronica (Alicia Kapudag), resurfaces in the lives of Holly and her Husband (Ali Aksoz). Veronica claims she has been changed and asks the couple to attend a seminar with her. Although somewhat reluctant the two attend a cult like seminar hosted by charismatic leader Bruce O’hara (David Sakurai). Claiming he can enter peoples dream mazes. O’hara singles out Holly referring to her as the one. Holly accepts his invitation to help her and that’s when shit gets weird… Up until this point the film has been a slow burner, grey and bleak feeling, interspersed with intensely sexual moments including a sizzling threesome and self loathing masturbation. Once O’hara enters Holly’s dream maze, colour pops, reality becomes difficult to separate from dream and brutal gore ensues. There isn’t a ton of gore in this one, but we do see a nice glimpse into Evrenol’s love of it. 

Without spoiling the end I can tell you that it’s distinctly Lovecraftian in nature and feels like not enough. It’s not enough because you don’t want it to end right where it does, you try to will it into taking you there, and to push a little further, but it’s also better left alone to make you wonder what happens next.

My biggest disappointment with this film was that it omitted a lot of the Turkish charms that Baskin had, opting to use English over Turkish and using a more American feeling backdrop. A lot of amazing horror films are coming out of Turkey and I personally enjoy them for being different.

Overall the film is unique and well made and from a non-extreme horror movie perspective I’d say it’s a solid 4/5.

 

Posted by Candace Stone in GORE OR EXTREME HORROR, MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, SCI-FI HORROR, THRILLER, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: The Inhabitants (2015)

MOVIE REVIEW: The Inhabitants (2015)

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By Nick Durham

We’ve had a bit of a renaissance lately in terms of some small-budgeted spooky movies that deliver the goods without buckets of blood and gore and rely more on old school tricks to give the viewer goose bumps. A lot of these films tend to be of the slow burn variety as well…which has its own share of likeable qualities (and some serious hate-worthy qualities as well). The Rasmussen Brothers (writers of John Carpenter’s The Ward and helmers of Dark Feed) throw their hat into the ring with The Inhabitants, which actually manages to make a fairly good impression despite its shortcomings.

The Inhabitants revolves around married couple Jess (Elise Couture) and Dan (Michael Reed), who have just purchased a New England-based bed and breakfast. Of course, as these things tend to go, the house itself holds some terrible secrets thanks to its past inhabitants. These come to light when Dan has to take an emergency business trip and leaves Jess all alone in the big, spooky house. All the creepy house hallmarks are here: scary shadows and figures, creaking sounds, and some creepy camera angles.  The film offers plenty of atmosphere that really gives the film an ominous tone and it works really well.

While The Inhabitants offers good atmosphere, there’s some other elements where the film sadly lacks. It begins with our leads in all honesty, neither characterization really reaches out to the viewer at all in any way. Not to mention the fact that there are some serious plot holes and flat out leaps in logic that pop up as the film crawls towards its conclusion. Granted the film’s story is a little inventive compared to other films of its ilk, so it does have that going for it at least.

All things considered, I could think of worse ways to kill an hour and a half. The Inhabitants isn’t half bad, but it doesn’t offer much either in all honesty. Still though, it does show that Michael and Shawn Rasmussen have talent and promise as filmmakers. Here’s hoping that they only go onward and upward.

Rating: 3/5

 

Posted by Alan Smithee in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments