Small Town Monsters

Monster Reviews: On the Trail of Bigfoot (2019) – Small Town Monsters

Monster Reviews: On the Trail of Bigfoot (2019) – Small Town Monsters

The legend of what is commonly known as “Bigfoot,” has been around for quite some time. Rumors and stories of the beast were reported long before the term was coined and internationally adopted back in 1958. They spoke of a giant hairy creature that terrorized homes and humans across the globe. For years tales of the beast have become the stuff of fantasy and lore, the stuff of nightmares.

On the Trail of Bigfoot is a six-part tv mini-series, written and directed by Seth Breedlove. The documentary series stars several respected investigators who currently work and do research in cryptozoology. Names such as Loren Coleman, Mark Matzke, Dr. David Floyd, Marc Myrsell, Kathy and Bob Strain. It depicts intriguing tales of Sasquatch encounters across the United States, straight from the mouths of eyewitnesses themselves.
The show takes viewers on a journey through the murky swamps and dark forests of our country, exploring the legend of America’s most beloved cryptids. Is Bigfoot real, or it is it just an old wives tale conjured up by the collective imagination? Is the creature flesh and blood, or is it a being from another dimension? STM takes its stab at the legend that is the squatch.
Whether you believe in the creature or not, On the Trail of Bigfoot provides a very informative look at the cryptid who has captured the hearts of fans worldwide. Many of Bigfoot’s most prominent advocates are also said to be its biggest skeptics. Take a walk down the trail with Small Town Monsters and director Seth Breedlove as they examine the possibility of the real existence of the hairy beasts.
There is no doubt that with reports dating as far back as the 1700s, something is out there.
What that thing is will continue to remain a mystery. Curious followers hope to one day get to the bottom of the truth behind stories and get a definitive answer to the questions that have baffled and inspired minds for centuries.
This show is a beautiful blend of scenery and Sasquatch. The storytelling is fantastic. It combines first-hand accounts and eyewitness reports with superbly crafted dramatization and stunning, picturesque landscapes. You can easily get lost in the beauty on screen, while at the same time being entirely absorbed by the stories told.
Bigfoot is universally adored due to it being the lone cryptid with the highest resemblance to humans. The potentiality of the creature being real drives people wild. We are supposed to be the superior race, and just the mere thought of something being out there on the loose that we cannot locate and have no control over drives people mad. Where are the bones, solid, conclusion wrapped in the neat little box with the tightly tied bow on top and the  actual proof?
On the Trail of Bigfoot allows fans of the famed cryptid to learn even more about the mythical monster. It discusses every version of the creature and dishes up content that some the hardest of squatchers might not even know about. Every location you go to has its own story and version of Bigfoot. However, no matter what the creature supposedly looks like, or what the locals refer to it as, they all come from the same family.Moreover, believe it or not, the odds are that at least a few of the reports have to be real.
People see something out there that they cannot explain. Also, no matter how strange that might sound, chances are it is true, which is a terrifying thought and an exciting, invigorating revelation to some.
What Seth Breedlove and Small Town Monsters are doing by making these cases and stories relevant again, is truly fantastic work. It genuinely is “the last great mystery,” and inquiring minds want to know. The truth is out there and continuing to put these reports at the forethought of society is what will eventually bring about truth, no matter how long it might take.
Whether you are a cryptid lover or you want to know if the creature exists, On the Trail of Bigfoot is an absolute must see. It asks all the right questions and navigates smoothly through the legends that surround the mysterious monster. Are there flesh and blood beasts on the loose, or are all the stories simply conjurings of humanity’s twisted imagination?




Posted by Donovan Smith in DOCUMENTARIES, DOCUMENTARY REVIEWS, FRIENDS OF THE HOUSE, MONSTERS AND CREATURES, MYTHS AND LEGENDS, PARANORMAL, SERIES REVIEWS, STAFF PICKS, 0 comments
Monster Interviews: Seth Breedlove- Small Town Monsters

Monster Interviews: Seth Breedlove- Small Town Monsters

Seth Breedlove is a producer, writer, and director from Bolivar, Ohio. He’s best known for his company, Small Town Monsters. In 2015 Breedlove released his first documentary film, The Minerva Monster, based on the local legend. Thanks to a warm reception from viewers, STM quickly built a huge fan base and has continued their strong storytelling ever since.

A fan of cryptids himself, Breedlove has initially been working in medical billing when he tried to pitch a book idea about monsters around the United States, called Small Town Monsters. After several unsuccessful attempts to seal the deal, while doing a podcast, he decided it was finally time to follow through and make what would be his first of many films to come. STM currently remains at the forefront of cryptozoology and has yet to hit their stride.

  • DS: At what point did you realize you wanted to be a filmmaker and how did you wind up working behind the camera, directing?

 

  • SB: I knew I wanted to make movies in my teens, and really, the goal upon graduating high school was to head off to New York Film Academy, learn the craft and then start making movies. I ended up doubting the realism of pursuing a career in making movies, and giving up on the idea and going through numerous, monotonous jobs before making Minerva Monster. In a way, though, I’d been training to make movies for a couple of decades, by merely watching anything I could get my hands on and reading books about directors and film making going back to my teens. I ended up being the director because I did the initial research work and picked the stories we made early on. Then everything else built up around me after those first two STM movies, and soon I was running my own production company.

 

  • DS: When did your affection for cryptids begin? What was it initially that attracted you to them, and what compelled you to feel the need to share and tell their stories?

 

  • SB: I got into Cryptids reasonably recently. Maybe 10-12 years ago. Initially, it was just a casual interest brought about by watching some crappy tv shows about sea monsters and Bigfoot. Then I started learning about sightings taking place near my hometown of Bigfoot-type creatures which sparked my interest, and soon I was interviewing people about their experiences. I just wanted to know if there was anything to the subject; any shred of truth. Once I started going down the rabbit hole, then I started seeing there was a need for films that retold essential events rather than focused on running trying to find real monsters and so that’s what I decided to do.

 

 

  • DS: How did you come up with Small Town Monsters? What was your inspiration for creating the brand and logo, and does it have any significant meaning to you?



  • SB: I grew up in a small town, and I was fascinated by the Minerva Monster case, which involved a rash of hairy monster sightings near the small town of Minerva, Ohio in the 1970s. I had learned that most of the city had forgotten the story or didn’t want anything to do with it which seemed a shame to be given its importance to the area at the time. I found a handful of other similar cases from around the US and started compiling a list of them that could be turned into films. This was back in 2013. Originally, Small Town Monsters was simply the name of a casebook I was pitching to publishers, but it eventually became the series title and the name of the production company.



  • The logo was brilliantly created by my friend Michael Santi. I think the name and branding have worked out pretty well. It’s all right there. You see the logo or the series name, and you instantly know what you’re going to get.

 

 

  • DS: What led you to want to chase monsters? Which cryptids are your favorite and which ones do you find the most intriguing?



  • SB: Oh, I don’t even consider it is chasing monsters. I’ve been on a couple of searches for Bigfoot, but that was mostly due to the filming of On the Trail of Bigfoot. I consider what we are doing storytelling. I’m much more interested in capturing witness accounts and retelling these stories in an exciting way than I am in the actual reality of the monsters. Although Bigfoot is a little different, I guess. I want to know if that’s legit, so Bigfoot is probably my favorite. I love the Flatwoods Monster and Mothman, and I’m intrigued by the Thunderbird phenomenon right now, so that’s where I’m focused, currently.

 

 

  • DS: You’ve recently produced some pretty potent content. At the risk of becoming stale, how do you plan to keep things current and innovative, and not bogged down with the same old stories?



  • SB: We try to change up the style and storytelling on every project based on our interests and those dictated by the actual events. “On the Trail of” allows us to play with episodic storytelling and they’re shot in a news shooter or verite style while the movies tend to be much more cinematic. You’ll see three utterly different storytelling styles on display this year from STM, with the cinema verite style of Otto to the traditional, historical documentary style of Terror in the Skies to the drive-in, 70s horror-inspired MOMO: The Missouri Monster where over 70 percent of the film is a narrative retelling of the monster sightings. Things would get stale, not just for the audience but for us, if we just kept doing the same stuff over and over, so you’ll probably see us shake things up with each new project

 

  • However, the editing side of On the Trail of Bigfoot was a beast, compared to something like Terror in the Skies. I was trying to distill years of history or easily explain multiple storytelling threads in short, 25-30 minute chunks. I think every episode was edited and re-edited at least three times to make it all work. It was exhausting because I was editing “Terror” at the same time.

 

    • DS: You’re “On the Trail of” series is fantastic. How did that concept originate and what’s it like doing a tv series as opposed to a film?
    • SB: Thanks so much! I was so nervous putting that series out since it’s such a dramatic departure from the movies, but the response has been phenomenal. The concept behind the “On the Trail of” series is still being worked out. Initially, it was just what we do with the movies only episodic. Then Aleksandar Petakov made his On the Trail of Champ series and changed my thinking about what the title could mean. I love the fact that it’s pretty much been a one-man-band project from the beginning. That added such an interesting approach to the film making side of it and presented a challenge for me that I loved tackling. The actual filming of the series is considerably more straightforward in some ways, from our films. With the movie, we’re trying to set the bar higher and higher visually on each project, and we have to do lighting for interviews and the recreations and all that. On the Trail merely is me setting my camera down in front of someone and they talk to it, or me with a camera in the woods capturing whatever happens.
    •  
    • DS: Being a journalist and reporter yourself, how does it feel to be interviewing and interacting with some of the famous legends in the field of cryptozoology, such as Lyle Blackburn, Loren Coleman, and Linda S. Godfrey?


    • SB: I try to learn as much from them as possible. Someone like Linda or Loren, where they’ve spent years looking into these subjects and have such a portfolio of work behind them. Linda was intimidating, as well, because I’m a writer and started as a newspaper reporter much as she did. Our paths follow a similar trajectory, although she pushed further into writing while I moved more toward the visual side of things. I’ve come to appreciate getting to spend time with people like those three because they can teach me so much.
    • DS: Where can people keep up to date with you, as well as follow Small Town Monsters? Which social channels are you most active on?


    • SB: We’re on Facebook, or Twitter and Instagram. I do a podcast called Monsteropolis with my buddy Mark Matzke which is an STM production, so that’s a great place to keep up with us. The official website is smalltownmonsters.com or onthetrailof.tv.
    • DS : Do you have any upcoming projects or campaigns you want to inform your fans? Is there anything unique or exciting you have planned for STM in the future?



    • SB: Terror in the Skies lands on June 7th, which I’m excited. I think it’s a visual feast and deals with some topics that are important to me, personally. Momo is the next phase in the evolution of STM and will blow some minds when it arrives this Halloween. It will be the first of its kind. 2020 will be a banner year for us, as well, since we’ll be celebrating our fifth STM anniversary. We have some great stuff planned for the Kickstarter launching next February so stay tuned for that.
  • DS: To wrap up, we usually like to ask what your favorite horror film of all time is. However, since STM deals in cryptids, what’s your favorite cryptid based movie of all time?



  • SB: Man…can I call Creature from the Black Lagoon a cryptid film? It’s always seemed like one to me. Otherwise, I’d go with Creature from Black Lake. That’s just an entertaining, campy 70s horror movie that I’ve come to love while prepping for MOMO.

 

Posted by Donovan Smith in COMING SOON, EXCLUSIVE, HORROR HISTORY, HOSTED HORROR, INTERVIEWS, MONSTERS AND CREATURES, MOVIE REVIEWS, MYTHS AND LEGENDS, NEW RELEASES, PARANORMAL, REVIEWS, 0 comments

COMING SOON: Boggy Creek Monster

Boggy Creek Monster
The Truth Behind the Legend

By Woofer McWooferson

Boggy Creek MonsterThe Boggy Creek Monster will be prowling across the US soon. The feature-length documentary began filming on April 22, 2016 and is now in post-production. This is the third offering from Small Town Monsters, following Minerva Monster (2015) and Beast of Whitehall (2016).

Author and cryptozoologist Lyle Blackburn (The Beast of Boggy Creek: The True Story of the Fouke Monster) and Brandon Dalo (Beast of Whitehall) will be co-producing. Boggy Creek Monster will primarily focus on the true stories behind the 1972 horror classic The Legend of Boggy Creek.

Writer/director Seth Breedlove refers to the piece as the ultimate repository of information on the Fouke county monster. Thus, Boggy Creek Monster will also cover more recent Bigfoot sightings.

The Legend of Boggy Creek movie poster

The Legend of Boggy Creek movie poster.

Boggy Creek Monster held a Kickstarter for crowd-funding, meeting its first goal of $9,000 in only four days and raising $17,000 by the end of the campaign. Breedlove believes the campaign succeeded because of a growing interest in the mystery and a hunger for information. Breedlove also noted that Boggy Creek Monster will be Small Town Monsters’ biggest production yet, incorporating cinema-grade cameras, night-vision cameras, helicopters, and drones.

The genesis of the film lies in the sightings of the monster by residents in and around Boggy Creek and Fouke, Arkansas. Lyle Blackburn, who is a consultant in addition to producer, will appear in the film to discuss his research on the subject. Zac Palmisano is in charge of the cinematography, and Dalo will score the soundtrack in addition to co-producing.

On May 25, 2016, Small Town Monsters released the first teaser trailer, leaving fans and interested parties wanting more. Take a look and let House of Tortured Souls know what you think.

Those seeking more information can check the Boggy Creek Monster Facebook page or the Small Town Monsters website.

Posted by Alan Smithee in COMING SOON, HORROR NEWS, 0 comments