Ted Raimi

For the longest time horror fans were fixated on the faux grindhouse trailer Thanksgiving (2008) by ELI ROTH to Thankskilling (2009). Both films had what we wanted Over the top gore and it was a thanksgiving horror movie. A first for their kind. Then Arrow released news of a forgotten gem that made the fans of horror drool at the mouth. I’m talking about the 80’s slasher movie BLOOD RAGE (1987) AKA SLASHER and NIGHTMARE AT SHADOW WOODS. With all the titles and cuts this was the movie most didn’t know, and the other half were eagerly anticipating its release. For good reason the film was shot in 83 and released in 87 and the fx was done by Ed French from Terminator 2 (1991) which was worth every penny and we’ll get to that in a bit. The film’s plot: As kids, Todd is institutionalized for a murder whilst his twin goes free. 10 years later, on Thanksgiving, Todd escapes and a killing spree begins in his neighborhood.”  The movie is good for what it’s worth. An 80’s slasher movie with a great synthesizer and great deaths. Sure, the movie has cheesy dialogue & acting, however we can’t forget this was made in the 80’s. What saves this movie is the gore in the film showcasing ED’s talent. Including a death scene in the woods that silly as it’s executed (no pun intended) is amazing. As for the fans there’s also a quick cameo by none other than Ted Raimi who you will know as the brother of Sam Raimi and happens to pop in some really great horror movies. The movie doesn’t hold any mystery on who the killer nor does he use any costumes just straight up murdering people of course there’s some cheesy one liners including the infamous “It’s not cranberry sauce” So over all let’s be thankful there’s this movie out there sure it may be a b movie slasher to some people but this film is top shelf horror for the fans who after a day of eating turkey and feeling tired, plop on the couch pop open a cold drink with friends pop that pop corn turn on the tv and watch the first ever Thanksgiving slasher movie set in Florida about an evil twin.

Let’s be thankful for Blood Rage

Let’s be thankful for Blood Rage

For the longest time horror fans were fixated on the faux grindhouse trailer Thanksgiving (2008) by ELI ROTH to Thankskilling (2009). Both films had what we wanted Over the top gore and it was a thanksgiving horror movie. A first for their kind. Then Arrow released news of a forgotten gem that made the fans of horror drool at the mouth. I’m talking about the 80’s slasher movie BLOOD RAGE (1987) AKA SLASHER and NIGHTMARE AT SHADOW WOODS. With all the titles and cuts this was the movie most didn’t know, and the other half were eagerly anticipating its release. For good reason the film was shot in 83 and released in 87 and the fx was done by Ed French from Terminator 2 (1991) which was worth every penny and we’ll get to that in a bit. The film’s plot: As kids, Todd is institutionalized for a murder whilst his twin goes free. 10 years later, on Thanksgiving, Todd escapes and a killing spree begins in his neighborhood.”  The movie is good for what it’s worth. An 80’s slasher movie with a great synthesizer and great deaths. Sure, the movie has cheesy dialogue & acting, however we can’t forget this was made in the 80’s. What saves this movie is the gore in the film showcasing ED’s talent. Including a death scene in the woods that silly as it’s executed (no pun intended) is amazing. As for the fans there’s also a quick cameo by none other than Ted Raimi who you will know as the brother of Sam Raimi and happens to pop in some really great horror movies. The movie doesn’t hold any mystery on who the killer nor does he use any costumes just straight up murdering people of course there’s some cheesy one liners including the infamous “It’s not cranberry sauce” So over all let’s be thankful there’s this movie out there sure it may be a b movie slasher to some people but this film is top shelf horror for the fans who after a day of eating turkey and feeling tired, plop on the couch pop open a cold drink with friends pop that pop corn turn on the tv and watch the first ever Thanksgiving slasher movie set in Florida about an evil twin.


Posted by Jai Alexis in Categories, EDITORIALS, HORROR NEWS, MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, THRILLER, 0 comments
HELLABRATION DELUXE! Thirty-One Days of SHOCKTOBER: Day Six – 10/06/18

HELLABRATION DELUXE! Thirty-One Days of SHOCKTOBER: Day Six – 10/06/18

10/06 – 1992: CANDYMAN

“It was always you, Helen…”

All you have to do is say that to someone, and then watch as they shudder as if a big spider just moonwalked across the back of their neck. If that’s the reaction they give you, then you know they’re probably a fan of CANDYMAN.  Besides Stephen King, Ira Levin and Dean Koontz, not many writers have had the indelible, undeniable impact on the horror genre that CLIVE BARKER has, and if HELLRAISER had been his only contribution, his legacy would have been set. But the man wrote such compelling, irresistibly addictive stories that begged to be adapted for the screen (though the success of doing so is another thing entirely,) that other filmmakers took the plunge to try and replicate what he did with his touchstone of a film.

 

For my money, the only person who’s been about as successful as Barker has in translating his own tales is British director BERNARD ROSE (PAPERHOUSE), a stunning visual fantasist in his own right, on par with the likes of MARY LAMBERT and GUILLERMO DEL TORO. No one could’ve been a better fit for CANDYMAN than Rose, and it shows in every frame.  Based on Barker’s tale, “The Forbidden”, there hadn’t been a story like this before, that encapsulated the themes of racism, classism, misogyny, poverty, mythology and the supernatural quite like this.

Helen Lyle (the radiant VIRGINIA MADSEN of such cult hits as DUNE and ELECTRIC DREAMS) is a grad student working on her dissertation, about how urban myths affect the landscape and people in impoverished areas, and vice versa. The main target of her research is Chicago’s notorious Cabrini Green projects, where she comes to learn about the ultimate horror story: the gruesome and tragic tale of Daniel Robitaille, a.k.a. “The Candyman.”

An artistically-talented black man who dared to fall in love with a white woman, Daniel payed the ultimate price, losing a hand and having honeycombs filled with live bees shoved into his chest cavity, as a gruesomely fatal form of torture.  And now, he has become legend: say his name three times in front of a mirror, and his vengeance-hungry ghost will appear, to deliver a demise you wouldn’t want to imagine.

Ever the cynical academic, Helen believes less than nothing about the things she actually writes about, so she decides to try and conjure him up. Imagine her shock, terror and dread fascination…when she succeeds.

Now Candyman is laying waste to people in her life (some way more deserving of a brutal death than others), and letting her take the fall for it, trying to break her down physically and psychologically, so that soon she will have no choice but to join him and “be his victim” forever…and become ‘legend’ as he has.

Director Rose’s surrealist sensibilities were the perfect platform with which to elevate Barker’s tale to a whole new level as a film, thanks in no small part to DP ANTHONY B. RICHMOND (DON’T LOOK NOW, RAVENOUS, AUTOPSY).  And the actors were more than happy to tackle and own their roles in this endeavor: Madsen has never been a more beautiful combination of strength and vulnerability – even in DUNE, which hardly gave her as much to do as she has here – and CANDYMAN is the role that finally made genre actor TONY TODD a household name, and with good reason. He slips into the skin and psyche of Daniel Robitaille like it was the role he was born to play, which isn’t far from the truth.

Plus a great supporting cast that includes KASI LEMMONS (THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS) as Helen’s best friend; XANDER BERKELEY (GATTACA, AIR FORCE ONE, TAPEHEADS and way too many other credits to list here) as Helen’s faithless other half; VANESSA WILLIAMS, (a.k.a. VANESSA L. WILLIAMS), TED RAIMI, and STANLEY DESANTIS in an unforgettable cameo as Helen’s condescending headshrinker.

And just when you think it couldn’t get any better, iconoclastic composer PHILIP GLASS contributed what has to be his best and most beloved score after KOYAANISQATSI, a sumptuous, reverent and almost religious musical landscape that intensifies in majesty to match the onscreen horror, (a style of composition that would later be replicated by other composers as diverse as ELIOTT GOLDENTHAL and MICHAEL NYMAN & DAMON ALBARN.)

CANDYMAN isn’t just a piece of horror mastery as worthy and as iconic as A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET or FRIDAY THE 13TH, but a necessary item in every dyed-in-the-wool horror lover’s library.

Posted by Samuel Glass in EDITORIALS, FEATURED CONTENT, GORE OR EXTREME HORROR, HALLOWEEN, HORROR HEROES, MYTHS AND LEGENDS, PARANORMAL, SLASHERS AND BAD HUMANS, THRILLER, TRIBUTE, URBAN DECAY/DYSTOPIAN FUTURES, 1 comment
THIS JUST IN: Ash vs. Evil Dead Canceled

THIS JUST IN: Ash vs. Evil Dead Canceled

Since Starz moved Ash vs Evil Dead to Sunday night, the ratings have never recovered and the fan favorite has been canceled. That’s right. In spite of scores like a 99% on the Rotten Tomatoes Tomatometer (94% on the Audience Tomatometer) and 8.5 stars on IMDb, Ash vs Evil Dead has been staked, leaving fans disappointed and wanting more.

Word hit when Bruce Campbell tweeted earlier this afternoon:

Ash Vs Evil Dead has been the ride of a lifetime. Ash Williams was the role of a lifetime.
I will always be grateful to Starz, Sam Raimi, Rob Tapert and our tireless fans for the opportunity to revisit the franchise that launched our careers. Thank you!
RIP Ash vs Evil Dead - Bruce Campbell's tweet

Ash vs Evil Dead, which starred Ray Santiago, Dana DeLorenzo, and Lucy Lawless in addition to Bruce Campbell, saw Ash drawn back into fighting the Deadites long after the events in the movie franchise. Like the movies – especially the two sequels, Ash vs Evil Dead was a fun and gore-filled but cheesy romp through one outrageous event after another. Ash vs Evil Dead not only gave us more of the Ashley J. Williams we all know and love, it also gave us more about Ash and his family. We learned of Ash’s guilt and suffering after his sister’s death as well as his ostracization by nearly everyone in his hometown. We meet his father – and Lee Majors playing Ash’s father was positively inspired casting – as well as his daughter, and there are hints of more… so much more… to come. Alas, unless something changes dramatically at Starz, those hints are all we’ll ever have.

I’m glad to see that Bruce has a groovy attitude because I and other fans of the show are bummed.

House of Tortured Souls wishes Bruce and everyone else involved in the Evil Dead film franchise and TV series the best.

Thank you.

Posted by Alan Smithee in HORROR NEWS, SATANIC/DEMONIC, 0 comments
History of Horror in December

History of Horror in December


By Woofer McWooferson

Join House of Tortured Souls as we celebrate significant dates in the history of horror in December. Click on thumbnails for full images.

December 1 - 7


12/01/1944 – House of Frankenstein (1944) released theatrically

House of Frankenstein / Fair use doctrine.



Howling II / Fair use doctrine.


12/01/1985 – Howling II: Stirba – Werewolf Bitch released theatrically



12/02/1924 – John Herbert “Jonathan” Frid (Barnabas Collins in Dark Shadows) born

John Herbert “Jonathan” Frid / Fair use doctrine.



London After Midnight / Fair use doctrine.

12/03/1927 – London After Midnight released theatrically



12/04/1954 – Tony Todd (actor in Night of the Living Dead (1990), Candyman, and Final Destination) born

Tony Todd / Fair use doctrine.



Cat People / Fair use doctrine.

12/06/1942 – Cat People (1942) released theatrically



12/07/1945 – House of Dracula released theatrically

House of Dracula / Fair use doctrine.

December 8 - 14


Blade: Trinity / Fair use doctrine.

12/08/2004 – Blade: Trinity released theatrically



12/10/1992 – Castlevania III: Dracula’s Curse released on the Nintendo Entertainment System in Europe

Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse / Fair use doctrine.



Paul Wegener / Fair use doctrine.

12/11/1874 – Paul Wegener (director of The Golem: How He Came Into the World) born (d. 1913)



12/12/1941 – The Wolf Man (1941) released theatrically

The Wolf Man / Fair use doctrine.



Phantom of the Opera / Fair use doctrine.

12/12/1943 – Phantom of the Opera (1943) released theatrically



12/12/1997 – Scream 2 released theatrically

Scream 2 / Fair use doctrine.



Wendie Malick / Image: MingleMediaTVNetwork

12/13/1950 – Wendie Malick (actress in the Tales from the Crypt episode “In the Groove”) born



12/14/1955 – Tarantula released theatrically

Tarantula / Public Domain.



Ted Raimi / Image: GabboT

12/14/1965 – Ted Raimi (actor in numerous horror films) born



12/14/2002 – Cabin Fever released theatrically

Cabin Fever / Fair use doctrine.



King Kong / Fair use doctrine.

12/14/2005 – King Kong (2005) released theatrically

December 15 - 20


12/15/1974 – Young Frankenstein released theatrically

Young Frankenstein / Fair use doctrine.



Ghost Story / Fair use doctrine.

12/15/1981 – Ghost Story released theatrically



12/16/1970 – Night Gallery premieres on television

Night Gallery / Fair use doctrine.



The Keep / Fair use doctrine.

12/16/1983 – The Keep released theatrically



12/16/1976 – King Kong (1976) released theatrically

King Kong / Fair use doctrine.



Nancy Kyes / Fair use doctrine.

12/19/1949 – Nancy Kyes (usually credited as Nancy Loomis, actress in Halloween and The Fog) born



12/19/1956 – The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1956) released theatrically

The Hunchback of Notre Dame / Fair use doctrine.



Little Shop of Horrors / Fair use doctrine.

12/19/1986 – Little Shop of Horrors released theatrically



12/20/1996 – Scream released theatrically

Scream / Fair use doctrine.



Maila Nurmi (aka Vampira) / Fair use doctrine.

December 21 – 27


12/21/1921 – Maila Nurmi (aka Vampira) born



12/21/1966 – Kiefer Sutherland (actor in The Lost Boys and Flatliners) born

Kiefer Sutherland / Image: Gage Skidmore


Freddie Francis / Fair use doctrine.

12/22/1917 – Freddie Francis (director and cinematographer of many horror films) born

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12/22/1932 – The Mummy (1932) released theatrically

The Mummy / Fair use doctrine.



Son of Kong / Fair use doctrine.

12/22/1933 – Son of Kong released theatrically



12/22/1944 – The Mummy’s Curse released theatrically

The Mummy's Curse / Fair use doctrine.



Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse / Fair use doctrine.

12/22/1989 – Castlevania III: Dracula’s Curse released on the Nintendo Entertainment System in Japan



12/23/1971 – Corey Haim (actor in Silver Bullet and The Lost Boys) born (d. 2010)

Corey Haim / Image: Bree from Worcester, MA



Diedrich Bader / Image: Gage Skidmore

12/24/1966 – Diedrich Bader (actor in Dead & Breakfast) born



12/25/1946 – The Beast with Five Fingers released theatrically

The Beast with Five Fingers / Fair use doctrine.



The Innocents / Fair use doctrine.

12/25/1961 – The Innocents released theatrically in France



12/25/1997 – An American Werewolf in Paris released theatrically

An American Werewolf in Paris / Fair use doctrine.



The Faculty / Fair use doctrine.

12/25/1998 – The Faculty released theatrically



12/25/1999 – Castlevania: Legacy of Darkness released on the Nintendo 64 in Japan

Castlevania: Legacy of Darkness / Fair use doctrine.



Wolf Creek / Fair use doctrine.

12/25/2005 – Wolf Creek released theatrically



12/26/1973 – The Exorcist released theatrically

The Exorcist / Fair use doctrine.



The Invisible Woman / Fair use doctrine.

12/27/1940 – The Invisible Woman released theatrically



12/28/1888 – F.W. Murnau (director of Nosferatu) born (d. 1931)

Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau / Public Domain.

December 29 - 31


Ghost in the Machine / Fair use doctrine.

12/29/1993 – Ghost in the Machine released theatrically



12/30/1942 – Fred Ward (actor in Tremors and Tremors 2: Aftershocks) born

Fred Ward / Fair use doctrine.



Eliza Dushku / Image: Alex Archambault from Dallas, TX

12/30/1980 – Eliza Dushku (actress in Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Soul Survivors, Wrong Turn, and Open Graves) born



12/31/1931 – Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931) released theatrically

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde / Fair use doctrine.



Sean Cunningham / Image: GabboT

12/31/1941 – Sean S. Cunningham (creator of the Friday the 13th series of films) born



12/31/1957 – The Strange World of Planet X released theatrically

The Strange World of Planet X / Fair use doctrine.



Zombie Revenge / Fair use doctrine.

12/31/1999 – Zombie Revenge released on Dreamcast and arcade

Posted by Alan Smithee in HORROR HISTORY, 0 comments