The Outer Limits

In Memoriam: Harlan Ellison 1934 – 2018

In Memoriam: Harlan Ellison 1934 – 2018

Harlan Ellison / Fair use doctrine.Around 1988, I had the great pleasure of spending two days off and on with Harlan Ellison. My first encounter was as part of a group of six having dinner with Harlan Ellison the night before he was to speak at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. When we met him in his hotel lobby, we discovered that no one had bothered to tell Harlan. There were mutterings of what to do, our group asking Harlan because he seemed annoyed. In typical Harlan fashion, he snapped, “Don’t ask me what I want to do because I want to go upstairs and go to bed.” Without missing a beat, I asked, “So should we all go upstairs and go to bed with you?” Harlan’s face was priceless, but the ice had been broken and we proceeded to dinner and an evening I will always remember.

Harlan was cantankerous, abrasive, temperamental, kind, considerate, and a force all his own. I will miss him deeply.

Original cover for Harlan Ellison's Rumble, now titled Web of the City.Born in 1934, Harlan Ellison grew up in Ohio and briefly attended Ohio State University before being expelled allegedly for punching a teacher who had criticized his writing ability. Ellison also served two years in the army in spite of being staunchly anti-war. Ellison published his first work in 1958, a novel titled Rumble, now retitled Web of the City, a semi-autobiographical non-fiction recollection of his time in a Brooklyn gang. The same year two short story collections were published, A Touch of Infinity and The Deadly Streets. After working in television for many years, Ellison published The Glass Teat in 1970, a collection of essays reflecting his opinion of television. The Other Glass Teat, published in 1975, is a follow-up work in the same vein.Harlan Ellison's The Glass Teat and The Other Glass Teat

Harlan Ellison was an American author whose fictional pieces were often of a science fiction, horror, or sci-fi horror nature, but anyone who ever called Harlan a “science fiction” writer never made that mistake a second time. Harlan eschewed labels that pigeon-holed his writing. Ellison’s 1,700+ published works include teleplays, screenplays, novellas, comic book scripts, and short stories as well as essays and critiques of television, film, literature, and more. For his work, Ellison has won Jupiter, Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Writer’s Guild of America, and Edgar awards. In 2000, Ellison also received the World Horror Convention Grand Master Award for his contributions to the field of horror literature.

Don Johnson as Vic and Tiger as Blood in Harlan Ellison's A Boy and His Dog

Don Johnson as Vic and Tiger as Blood in Harlan Ellison’s A Boy and His Dog

Ellison’s work can be seen on television shows such as Star Trek, The Sixth Sense, The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, The Hunger, Logan’s Run, and Babylon 5. In 1975, Ellison’s novella A Boy and His Dog was adapted into a movie with a very young Don Johnson and a (not as young) Jason Robards (Harlan, though not pleased with the adaptation, kindly autographed my copy). His 1967 short story “I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream”, a post-apocalyptic tale of sentient computers and suffering humans, won the Hugo award that year and is often considered one of the greatest post-apocalyptic stories of the 20th Century.

William Shatner and Joan Collins in Harlan Ellison's "The City on the Edge of Forever", one of the most highly acclaimed Star Trek episodes.

William Shatner and Joan Collins in Harlan Ellison’s “The City on the Edge of Forever”, one of the most highly acclaimed Star Trek episodes.

Ellison was also known for taking a vocal stand when he perceived that his work was being butchered or his creative contributions undermined. When this happened, Ellison would direct that the credits read Cordwainer Bird – save when he disagreed with changes to the Star Trek episode “The City on the Edge of Forever”. Interestingly, both Ellison’s original script and the shooting script won awards, the former being the Writers Guild for best episodic television drama (1968) and the latter being a Hugo for best dramatic presentation (1968). This episode also inspired the punk band Edith Keeler Must Die and the song “Edith Keeler Must Die” by Arigon Starr, both named after Spock’s assertion that, “Jim, Edith Keeler must die.” Nevertheless, while Hollywood may’ve not appreciated his efforts, Constant Readers certainly did. For fans, the name Cordwainer Bird immediately evokes knowing nods and “Um-hms”.

Harlan Ellison at the LA Press Club / Copyright 2006 by Galen A. Tripp

Harlan Ellison at the LA Press Club / Copyright 2006 by Galen A. Tripp

Regardless of his irascibility, his work has influenced countless other authors. Stephen King speaks fondly of Harlan and other authors who helped answer questions for Danse Macabre, his 1981 non-fiction book on horror in media.

Lastly, thanks are due to the writers— Ray Bradbury, Harlan Ellison, Richard Matheson, Jack Finney, Peter Straub, and Anne Rivers Siddons among them— who were kind enough to answer my letters of enquiry and to provide information about the genesis of the works discussed here. Their voices provide a dimension to this work which would otherwise be sadly lacking.
— Stephen King

I think that sentiment is as appropriate now – Harlan’s death will leave the world and the world of fiction sadly lacking. Rest in peace, Mr. Ellison.

I’d like to end this with another anecdote from my adventure with Harlan. Among the many outstanding moments, this one stands out above the others.

After dinner, we walked around 5-Points South and stopped to look over some items in the window of Memory Lane. I spotted a button that read “WAR is Menstruation ENVY” and laughed outrageously. We all agreed that it was awesome. The following day Harlan spoke to a small group from the UAB Honors Program. I arrived late to find that he had saved me a seat beside him. As I sat down, Harlan presented that same button to me. I still have it.

Thank you, Harlan. Rest in peace. You will be sorely missed.

Posted by Alan Smithee in HORROR NEWS, OBITUARY, STAFF PICKS, TRIBUTE, 0 comments
WiHM Interview: The Inimitable Barbie Wilde

WiHM Interview: The Inimitable Barbie Wilde

Woofer here, Souls, and it’s my great pleasure to introduce this interview. When discussing Women in Horror Month with my assistant editor Spencer, we decided that as fans of Hellraiser – both as the Books of Blood and the film franchise – we would be completely remiss if we didn’t reach out to Barbie Wilde. Being both talented and gracious, she consented to be interviewed and is our final focus for Women in Horror Month.

Barbie Wilde - Female Cenobite Hellbound: Hellraiser II (1988)

Well, that’s enough of my yammering. You’re all here to find out more about the lovely, talented, and kind Barbie Wilde, so keep on reading.
House of Tortured Souls: Did you ever think you would become a horror icon?
Barbie Wilde: I never did… And it’s a bit ironic that I nearly didn’t go to the audition for Hellbound Hellraiser II, because I found the first Hellraiser film so disturbing. (Although I did love the character of Julia. I’m a sucker for obsession! And the Cenobites were such original and unusual monsters.)
However, I’ve very glad that I did go, obviously. Being in Hellbound was a great experience and, speaking as a short blonde person, I’m truly thrilled that I’ve managed to scare so many people over the years.
HoTS: What is your favorite memory from working on Hellraiser II?
BW: Meeting Ken (Dr. Channard) Cranham for the first time. I walked up to him in full Female Cenobite makeup and costume, when he was in full Channard Cenobite makeup and costume — and on the phone to his wife as well! For some reason known only to the infernal powers below, I said: “Hi Ken, I’m Barbie. Do you want to get married and have babies called Pepper and Skipper?”
Why I thought that this was an appropriate way to introduce myself for the first time to such a venerable actor as Ken, I don’t know. Especially since he was English and had no idea that there were these famous American dolls called Barbie, Ken, Pepper and Skipper. (In Britain, the Barbie Doll equivalent is called Cindy.) In my defense, I do say this line to every “Ken” I meet, because for some strange reason, I think it’s hilarious.
Anyway, Ken was gobsmacked and whispered to his wife, “Darling, an actress is talking to me… I’ve got to go.” I apologized profusely and we’ve been good friends ever since.

The Lovely Barbie Wilde

HoTS: What was it like working with Tik and Tok?
BW: The years with Shock in the early 80s were fantastic. It was the most fun that I’ve ever had as a performer. Working with Tik and Tok was wonderful, as well as performing with Robert Pereno, LA Richards, and Carole Caplin. The high point for us was supporting Gary Numan at Wembley Arena, but we also toured with Depeche Mode and supported Ultravox as well.
HoTS: Who are some of your greatest influences?
BW: As a writer: Rod Serling, Patricia Highsmith, Clive Barker, Hemingway, Raymond Chandler, Colin Wilson.
Directors I admire are: Guillermo Del Toro, Hitchcock, Ridley Scott, the Soska Sisters, Ann Biller, Katherine Bigalow, Mary Harron, Agnieszka Smoczynska, Patty Jenkins.

Barbie Wilde's Blue Eyes - A Film By Chris Alexander

HoTS: How do you prepare for a role? Is it different for each?
BW: I approach each role in a new way. I don’t use any particular “method”. I’m very intuitive and I take a lot from the text…
HoTS: Why horror? What drew you to it?
BW: To be honest, I didn’t choose horror, horror chose me! I had moved from acting into presenting, writing and hosting TV shows when I was cast in Hellbound. It was my first horror movie. (Although I suppose being in Grizzly II: The Concert (1983) was my first appearance in a horror movie, but it was never released.)
It’s interesting, because until Paul Kane asked me to write a story for the Hellbound Hearts anthology, I was more interested in exploring the criminal mind in writing novel like my diary-of-a-serial-killer novel, The Venus Complex (published by Comet Press), than writing horror. But I had so much fun writing my Female Cenobite origin story (“Sister Cilice”) for Hellbound Hearts, that I continued writing horror, contributing short stories to various horror anthologies over the years, culminating in my illustrated, full color, short horror story collection, Voices of the Damned (published by SST Publications).

The Venus Complex (2012) by Barbie Wilde

Saying that though, I’ve always watched horror movies, ever since I was a kid, especially Sci-fi horror. Those films really shaped my twisted imagination! And TV shows like The Twilight Zone and The Outer Limits also made a big impression on me.
HoTS: What are your favorite horror films?
BW: I love the old black and white horrors like: The Thing From Another World (1951), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), The Innocents (1961), The Haunting (1963) and Night of the Demon AKA Curse of the Demon (1957). I also like visceral horror such as Carpenter’s The Thing (1982) and Alien (1979). Other favorites are: American Mary (2012), Sinister (2012), Audition (1999), The Lure (2015), Cronos (1993), Mimic (1997), Crimson Peak (2015), etc. (I’m really looking forward to seeing The Shape of Water and the Soska Sisters’ reimagining of Cronenberg’s Rabid.)
HoTS: What drew you to writing? Do you prefer it to acting?
BW: I’ll always love acting, but now I prefer creating my own worlds, my own characters and my own mythologies.
HoTS: When did you realize that you wanted to dive into the arts?
BW: I was a very shy kid, but when I was cast in a school play when I was 12, I was hooked forever. People were laughing with me, rather than at me. I loved it.

Voices of the Damned (2016) by Barbie Wilde

HoTS: What is something outside of art that you’re passionate about?
BW: Wine… Margaritas… Martinis… you see a pattern here? Actually, those are just hobbies! Seriously, I’m fascinated by archeology (it was my Minor at University) and I love what’s happening in the world of science with all the innovations that are happening, medical discoveries, etc. And I’m a tech geek. I never would have guessed that I’d love gadgets so much. I suppose it’s the Star Trek fan in me!

Barbie’s books and other works:

Out now:

Voices of the Damned, an illustrated short horror story collection published by SST Publications. (Publishers Weekly: “…sensual in its brutality.” “…a delight for the darker senses.”) Each story is illustrated in full color by top artists in the horror genre, such as Clive Barker, Nick Percival, Daniele Serra, Vincent Sammy, Tara Bush, Steve McGinnis, Ben Bradford and Eric Gross.

Barbie Wilde - Female Cenobite with knife in Hellbound: Hellraiser II (1988)

The Venus Complex, Barbie’s debut dark crime, diary-of-a-serial-killer novel, published by Comet Press. (Fangoria: “Wilde is one of the finest purveyors of erotically charged horror fiction around.”)

In pre-production:

A feature length horror film called Blue Eyes, based on a short story by Barbie. It’s co-written with Chris Alexander (Blood for Irina, Queen of Blood, Female Werewolf, Blood Dynasty, Space Vampire) and will be directed by Chris. Starring Nivek Ogre of Skinny Puppy.

Work-in-progress:

Film Script: “Zulu Zombies”.
New real life horror novel, working title: The Anatomy of Ghosts.

Plans for the future:

To find a publisher for graphic novels based on Barbie’s short stories “Sister Cilice” and “Zulu Zombies”.

The Offer (2017) - Barbie Wilde

In 2017, Barbie returned to acting after 17 years in The Offer, the first episode of the horror series, Dark Ditties, produced by Cult Film Screenings.

Barbie Wilde Social Media:

Barbie Wilde - Classic Beauty

Posted by Alan Smithee in STAFF PICKS, WOMEN IN HORROR, 0 comments
History of Horror in January

History of Horror in January


Join House of Tortured Souls as we celebrate significant dates in the history of horror in January. Click on thumbnails for full images.

January 1 - 7


1/1/1940 – Frank Langella (actor in Dracula (1979) and The Ninth Gate) born

19400101_Frank_Langella_Deauville_2012 / Image: Georges Biard



Cuba Gooding Jr. / Image: WireImage.com


1/2/1968 – Cuba Gooding Jr (actor in American Horror Story) born



1/2/2004 – Tremors 4: The Legend Begins released on DVD

20040102_tremors-4-the-legend-begins / Fair use doctrine.



19590105_Clancy Brown / Image: Frazer Harrison - © 2011 Getty Images

1/5/1959 – Clancy Brown (actor in many horror films) born



1/6/2006 – Hostel released theatrically

20060106_Hostel / Fair use doctrine.



20060106_BloodRayne / Fair use doctrine.

1/6/2006 – BloodRayne released theatrically



1/7/2005 – White Noise released theatrically

20050107_White Noise / Fair use doctrine.

January 8 - 14


19470108_David Bowie / Fair use doctrine.

1/8/1947 – David Bowie (actor in Labyrinth, The Hunger, and other horror movies) born



1/8/1988 – Return of the Living Dead Part II released on VHS

19880108_Return of the Living Dead Part II / Fair use doctrine.



20050111_Resident Evil 4 / Fair use doctrine.

1/11/2005 – Resident Evil 4 released for the Nintendo GameCube in North America



1/12/1940 – The Invisible Man Returns released theatrically

19400112_The Invisible Man Returns / Fair use doctrine.



19650112_Rob_Zombie_Comiccon / Image: Lindsey8417

1/12/1965 – Rob Zombie (musician, singer, artist, director of House of 1000 Corpses, The Devil’s Rejects, and Halloween (2007)) born



1/12/1990 – Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III released theatrically

19900112_leatherface_texas_chainsaw_massacre_3 / Fair use doctrine.



19390113_Son of Frankenstein / Fair use doctrine.

1/13/1939 – Son of Frankenstein released theatrically



1/13/1974 – The Satanic Rites of Dracula released theatrically

19740113_ Satanic Rites of Dracula / Fair use doctrine.



19950113_demon-knight-title / Fair use doctrine.

1/13/1995 – Tales from the Crypt: Demon Knight released theatrically



1/14/1981 – Scanners released theatrically

19810114_Scanners / Fair use doctrine.

January 15 - 21


19150115_Der Golem / Fair use doctrine.

1/15/1915 – Der Golem released theatrically



1/16/1948 – John Carpenter (director, screenwriter, producer, and composer of scores for many horror films) born

19480116_John Carpenter 2010-Nathan Hartley Maas / Image: Nathan Hartley Maas



19650116_the-outer-limits / Fair use doctrine.

1/16/1965 – The Outer Limits ends its run on television



1/17/1962 – Denis O’Hare (actor in American Horror Story) born

19620117_Denis O'Hare / Image: Alexander Berg - © 2006



20020118_Long-Time-Dead-Poster / Fair use doctrine.

1/18/2002 – Long Time Dead released theatrically in the United Kingdom



1/19/1809 – Edgar Allan Poe born (d. 1849)

18090119_Edgar_Allan_Poe;_a_centenary_tribute / Fair use doctrine.



19900119_tremors / Fair use doctrine.

1/19/1990 – Tremors released theatrically



1/19/1996 – From Dusk Till Dawn released theatrically

19960119_From Dusk Till Dawn / Fair use doctrine.



20020119_Dark Water (Japan) / Fair use doctrine.

1/19/2002 – Dark Water (2002) released theatrically in Japan



1/20/1970 – Skeet Ulrich (actor in Scream) born

19700120_Skeet_Ulrich_2010 / Image: Thomas Attila Lewis



19870120_Evan Peters / Image: Allen Berezovsky - © 2012 Getty Images

1/20/1987 – Evan Peters (actor in American Horror Story) born



1/20/2006 – Underworld: Evolution released theatrically

20060120_Underworld-Evolution-2006 / Fair use doctrine.



19560121_Geena Davis / Image: Steven D Starr - © gettyimages.com

1/21/1956 – Geena Davis (actor in Beetlejuice, The Fly) born



1/21/1998 – Resident Evil 2 released on the PlayStation in the United States

19980121_Resident_Evil_2 / Fair use doctrine.

January 22 - 28


19320122_Piper Laurie / Image: Theo Wargo - © WireImage.com

1/22/1932 – Piper Laurie (actor in Carrie) born



1/22/1959 – Linda Blair (actor in The Exorcist) born

19590122_Linda Blair. / Image: Rebecca Sapp - © WireImage.com



20000122_ring-0-birthday / Fair use doctrine.

1/22/2000 – Ring 0: Birthday released theatrically in Japan



1/23/1981 – Burial Ground: The Nights of Terror released theatrically

19810123_Burial Ground / Fair use doctrine.



20040123_the-butterfly-effect-original / Fair use doctrine.

1/23/2004 – The Butterfly Effect released theatrically



1/25/1926 – Ted White (Jason in Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter) born

19260125_Ted White / Fair use doctrine.



19430125_Tobe Hooper_Cannes_2014 / Image: Dark Attsios

1/25/1943 – Tobe Hooper (director of numerous horror films) born



1/25/2000 – The Dead Hate the Living! released on DVD

20000125_Deadhatetheliving / Fair use doctrine.



20050125_All Souls Day / Fair use doctrine.

1/25/2005 – All Souls Day released on DVD



1/26/1999 – Castlevania 64 released on the Nintendo 64 in the United States

19990126_Castlevania_N64 / Fair use doctrine.



19400127_James Cromwell / Image: Ryan Rogers http://ryan-rogers.com/ - © Copyright 2011, Ryan Rogers Photography

1/27/1940 – James Cromwell (actor in many horror productions) born



1/27/2005 – Resident Evil 4 released for the Nintendo GameCube in Japan

20050127_Resident Evil 4 (Japan) / Fair use doctrine.



20050128_Creep-2004 / Fair use doctrine.

1/28/2005 – Creep released theatrically



1/28/2005 – Hide and Seek released theatrically

20050128_Hide and Seek / Fair use doctrine.

January 29 - 31


19980129__Resident_Evil_2 / Fair use doctrine.

1/29/1998 – Resident Evil 2 released on the PlayStation in Japan



1/30/1976 – Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma released theatrically

19760130_Salo / Fair use doctrine.



19980131_ringu / Fair use doctrine.

1/31/1998 – Ringu released theatrically in Japan



1/31/1999 – Silent Hill released on the PlayStation in North America

19990131_Selent Hill PS1[ntsc][front] / Fair use doctrine.



20030131_final-destination / Fair use doctrine.

1/31/2003 – Final Destination released theatrically

Posted by Alan Smithee in HORROR HISTORY, HORROR NEWS, 0 comments
HISTORY OF HORROR: SEPTEMBER

HISTORY OF HORROR: SEPTEMBER

By Woofer McWooferson

Join House of Tortured Souls as we celebrate significant dates in the history of horror in September. Click on thumbnails for full images.

September 1 - 7


09/01/1939 – The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) released
theatrically

Poster The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) Copyright RKO Radio Pictures


Poster Universal Pictures

09/02/1923 – The Hunchback of Notre Dame released
theatrically


09/02/1978 – Dawn of the Dead released
theatrically

Fair use doctrine.


Image credit erinc salor

09/05/1942 – Werner Herzog (director of Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht) born


09/06/1879 – Max Schreck (actor who portrayed Count Orlok in Nosferatu) born

Public domain


Image Universal Pictures

09/06/1925 – The Phantom of the Opera (1925) released theatrically


09/07/1940 – Dario Argento (director, producer, and screenwriter of Suspira and other horror films) born

Photo by Ian Gavan - © 2012 Getty Images - Image courtesy gettyimages.com


Photo by Bobby Bank - © 2010 Bobby Bank - Image courtesy gettyimages.com

09/07/1954 – Doug Bradley (best known as Pinhead in the Hellraiser film series) born


09/07/2004 – Silent Hill 4: The Room released on the PlayStation, Xbox, and PC in North America

Image Konami

September 8 - 14


Fair use doctrine.

09/08/1990 – Bride of Re-Animator released theatrically


09/09/1954 – Jeffrey Combs (actor in many horror films) born

© Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Fair use doctrine.

09/09/1997 – Cube released theatrically


09/09/2004 – Resident Evil Outbreak File #2 released for the PlayStation 2 in Japan

Image Capcom


Copyright 2005 Sony Pictures

09/09/2005 – The Exorcism of Emily Rose released theatrically


09/10/1993 – The X-Files premieres on television

Fair use doctrine.


Fair use doctrine.

09/10/2004 – Resident Evil: Apocalypse released theatrically


09/11/1987 – Hellraiser released theatrically

Fair use doctrine.


Fair use doctrine.

09/11/1992 – Candyman released theatrically


09/12/1958 – The Blob (1958) released theatrically

Fair use doctrine.


Photo by Apger - © MPTV - Image courtesy mptvimages.com.

09/12/1992 – Anthony Perkins (actor who portrayed Norman Bates in the Psycho films) dies (b. 1932)


09/13/1913 – Paul Wegener (director of The Golem: How He Came Into the World) dies (b. 1874)

Photo by A7A08A39_023.jpg - © Archives du 7e Art/Deutsche Bioscop - Image courtesy photo12.com.


Fair use doctrine.

09/13/1991 – Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare released theatrically


09/13/2005 – Supernatural premieres on television

Fair use doctrine.


Fair use doctrine.

09/14/1960 – The Little Shop of Horrors (1960) released theatrically

September 15 - 21


09/15/1974 – The Ghost Galleon released theatrically



© Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

09/16/1963 – The Outer Limits premiered on television


09/16/2002 – Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance released on the Game Boy Advance in the US

Box art. Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/16/2005 – Cry_Wolf released theatrically


09/17/2004 – Silent Hill 4: The Room released on the PlayStation, Xbox, and PC in Europe

Image: Konami.


Fair use doctrine.

09/17/2004 – Resident Evil Outbreak released on the PlayStation 2 in Europe


09/18/1963 – The Haunting (1963) released theatrically

Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/18/1998 – The Dentist 2: Brace Yourself released theatrically


09/20/1940 – The Mummy’s Hand released theatrically

Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.


Fair use doctrine.

09/20/1975 – Asia Argento (actress in many horror films, daughter of Dario Argento and Daria Nicolodi) born


09/21/1947 – Stephen King born

Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/21/1984 – The Company of Wolves released theatrically in the UK

September 22 - 28


09/22/1986 – Castlevania released for the Nintendo Entertainment System

Box art. Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/22/1995 – Se7en released theatrically


09/22/1999 – Resident Evil 3: Nemesis released for the PlayStation in Japan

Box art. Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/23/1988 – Dead Ringers released theatrically


09/24/2001 – Silent Hill 2 released on the PlayStation, Xbox, and PC in the US

Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/24/2002 – Vampires: Los Muertos released on video in the US


09/24/2004 – Shaun of the Dead released theatrically in the US

Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/25/1959 – The Mummy (1959) released theatrically


09/25/1994 – Alone in the Dark 2 released on PC

Box art. Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/25/1998 – Urban Legend released theatrically


09/26/1962 – Carnival of Souls released theatrically

Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.


Fair use doctrine.

09/26/1970 – Sheri Moon (actress in House of 1000 Corpses, The Devil’s Rejects, Toolbox Murders) born


09/27/1985 – The New Twilight Zone premiered on television

Fair use doctrine.


Box art. Fair use doctrine.

09/27/2001 – Silent Hill 2 released on the PlayStation, Xbox, and PC in Japan


09/28/1987 – Friday the 13th: The Series premiered on television

Title card. Fair use doctrine.


Fair use doctrine.

09/28/2007 – Moonlight premiered on television


09/29/1955 – The Night of the Hunter released theatrically

Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/29/1995 – Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers released theatrically

September 30


09/30/1984 – Tales from the Darkside premiered on television

Title card. Fair use doctrine.


Movie poster. Fair use doctrine.

09/30/1988 – Elvira, Mistress of the Dark released theatrically


09/30/2005 – Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow released on the Nintendo DS in the European Union

Box art. Fair use doctrine.

Posted by Alan Smithee in HORROR HISTORY, 0 comments