EDITORIALS

EDITORIAL: Six Things That Will Make the New Halloween Amazing

EDITORIAL: Six Things That Will Make the New Halloween Amazing

Horror fans all over lost their collective minds over the news that Jamie Lee Curtis will once again return as Laurie Strode in the new Halloween film, and while fans patiently wait I had my own ideas on what needs to happen for this to be awesome. In the extremely off chance a studio executive is reading this please take notes.
1. Make it a direct sequel to Halloween II
This is largely considered what will happen and indeed it makes the most sense. When I first heard this I thought, wait H20 was a very good follow up to Halloween II — and indeed when I watch the films I make it part of the Laurie trilogy (and I ignore Halloween: Resurrection because it’s terrible). This also brings me to the number two entry…
2. Set the timeline in the early 80s NOT in modern times
There are conflicting reports about the timeline. Some are saying they are setting it in modern times while others are predicting it will literally pick up where Halloween II left off. I, for one, would love this movie to be set in the 80s, and with nostalgia filled projects like Stranger Things and It making huge waves, it just may. And as I mentioned above H20 basically already did the modern Laurie and her struggles — and brilliantly I might add. There really isn’t anything new to bring to that.
3. Ignore the other sequels
If, in fact, this picks up where Halloween II leaves off the problem of sequels disappears nicely. It also doesn’t ignore them (because they simply didn’t happen at this point) but it doesn’t highlight them either. In a way it’s a nice comprise for both lovers of the sequels and those who only liked the first two. Again it just makes things easier and makes more sense writing-wise.
4. Avoid gimmick casting
No LL Cool J, and no Busta Rhymes; keep it simple while casting it. This doesn’t mean you can’t throw in a familiar face or two but try and be classy about it. Since it might be set in the 80s maybe even shock rocker Alice Cooper in a fun cameo?
5. Handle Dr. Loomis carefully
Dr. Sam Loomis is such a beloved character that if this film indeed will pick up where Halloween II ended they want to pay close attention to exactly how the Loomis character is handled. After all, we saw Peter Cushing’s Grand Moff Tarkin come back for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story with mixed results so, hopefully, they can bring Donald back with more success.
6. Be careful with fanservice
Fanservice for a popular film can both help and hurt — Cult of Chucky, to me, felt like it suffered from bad fan service, adding the Andy character which did nothing to help the already confused plot. However, in H20 fans were treated to some great moments that hearkened back to the series yet felt organic to the plot. Hopefully, this can be handled with some measure of restraint.
Posted by Mike Vaughn in EDITORIALS, HALLOWEEN, 0 comments
Schock’s Top 5 Albums for the Halloween Mood

Schock’s Top 5 Albums for the Halloween Mood

I’m going to run through five albums to put you in the Halloween spirit. We all love music, and we all have stuff we are used to. I’m always on the hunt for something new and fresh, so let me help you out this Halloween season. You cannot go wrong with my Top 5 Albums That Scream HALLOWEEN when listened to any time of the year.
Misfits — Collection 2: This one in particular because A) It’s got the song “Halloween” on the album. It’s the original incarnation of the Misfits and a staple in any horror fans collection.Misfits_-_Collection_II_cover / Fair use doctrine.

Mister Monster — Over Your Dead Body: This album is so fucking good. The whole vibe of the record gives you a cold chill and makes you want to just sit by a campfire to warm up while crooning your way into your partner’s pants.Mister Monster-Over Your Dead Body / Fair use doctrine.
AFI — All Hallow’s EP and Black Sails in the Sunset EP: There was a time when AFI was absolutely amazing and these two albums… (I’m using two here because there are only 4 tracks on the All Hallow’s EP.) These two albums set a nice relaxed vibe that always, for some reason, get me thinking about walking around, kicking leaves, and enjoying the cool air. The song “Fall Children” on All Hallow’s EP is, by far, my favorite Halloween song ever written.AFI-AllHallow's and Black Sails / Fair use doctrine.
Silent Horror — Self Titled: This is a record that is from start to finish spooky and fun and screams horror and Halloween all the way through. I put this next to Mister Monster’s OYDB as one of the best horror punk records ever.Silent Horror - Self Titled / Fair use doctrine.
The Spook — Some Like It Dead: A band from the land of Germany. The Spook is another horror punk band that not only needs to be listened to, also needs to be understood. This album gives you the feeling of horror and Halloween – from the super scary factor right down to the whimsy and fun of Halloween. The Spook delivers this on this record.The Spook-Some Like It Dead / Fair use doctrine.
So there you have it the Schock TOP 5 Albums to put you in the mood for Halloween. Find them, listen and enjoy.
Posted by Schock in EDITORIALS, MUSIC REVIEWS, 0 comments
EDITORIAL: Due Process and Mob Justice

EDITORIAL: Due Process and Mob Justice

Sexual assault of any kind is a serious issue and always will be. Allegations of such should – nay, must – be taken seriously if we are to remain a civilized society. What is also serious, however, is adhering to our US judicial system and remembering at all times that due process is something we should all support. The moment we put law aside and pick up our pitchforks is the moment we cease being a fair and just society and move back toward a time of vigilante justice.
Dictionary.com defines due course of law as follows:
due course of law
noun
1.
due process of law.
due process of law
noun
1.
the regular administration of the law, according to which no citizen may be denied his or her legal rights and all laws must conform to fundamental, accepted legal principles, as the right of the accused to confront his or her accusers.
Also called due process, due course of law.
The Oxford online English dictionary supports this, and its definition of due process reads as follows:
due process (also due process of law)
NOUN
mass noun
Fair treatment through the normal judicial system, especially a citizen’s entitlement to notice of a charge and a hearing before an impartial judge.
As almost everyone in the horror community knows, Harry Knowles, founder of Ain’t It Cool News, Fantastic Fest, and Butt-Numb-A-Thon, has recently been accused of sexual assault by an Austin-area woman named Jasmine Baker. The incidents, which are alleged to have happened back in 1999 – 2000, are just now coming to light because Baker says she can no longer remain silent and no longer wishes to remain silent. This is her right, and I support it 100%. If the things that she alleges happened, then Knowles must be held accountable.
But it is not the place of the public to make that decision. That’s why we have courts of law.
Recently, Lloyd Kaufman, co-founder of Troma Films, has come under intense fire for asserting that Knowles deserves due process. Kaufman has been condemned and accused of having something to hide for supporting Knowles when, in fact, he is supporting the justice system of which Americans are proud – and usually rightfully so. I use the qualifier usually because our justice system does not always get it right, but that doesn’t mean we should abandon it in favor of returning to lynch mobs and guilty-until-proven-innocent mentalities. And yet we often do – even within the justice system itself.
Here’s Mr. Kaufman’s original tweet:Lloyd Kaufman 01_crop - original tweet / Fair use doctrine.
As a survivor of sexual assault, I completely understand Baker’s initial reluctance to come forward and admire her courage in doing so later. The ordeal for her is just starting as it is common knowledge that sexual assault trials are extremely difficult for the victims. They are routinely taken to task, accused of encouraging it, leading on the perpetrator, not fighting against the perpetrator enough, keeping quiet because they “know” they were in the wrong, and having their sexual histories paraded out as evidence that they are “loose” and somehow complicit in the assault itself. They might even be forced to show exactly how they were dressed at the time of the assault as if that should have any bearing whatsoever on the crime. This is not only wrong; it is humiliating and emotionally devastating.
However, it’s troubling to see that so many are willing to call for the heads of not only the alleged perpetrators but also of anyone who believes we should let the courts do their job.
Perhaps this is because we often see the courts get it wrong. Time and again we’ve witnessed cases where the evidence clearly came out to support the assault allegations, but the court has allowed the evidence to slide in favor of the assailant. Yes, I’ve moved from alleged to assailant because when the evidence shows guilt, it is no longer an allegation.
We should fight against the courts getting it wrong, no doubt about that, and we should remove justices who ignore objectively guilty perpetrators and dismiss the punishments they deserve. But we must do this within the system. And we must also allow people to promote due process without going after them as if they have done something wrong. Condemning people who speak out against it is, in many ways, as bad as not condemning the act itself. If history has taught us anything, it is (or should be) that we are capable of critical thinking and creating great things, but we are also guilty of being the animals that we are and tossing our reasoning aside to be led by our emotions.
Humans are flawed. We get a lot wrong, but we also get a lot right. In the end, however, we must have a balance – neither being emotionless machines nor reasonless animals.
Read follow-up tweets by Mr. Kaufman:
Read Troma’s official statement:Troma statement on Lloyd Kaufman and due process_scaled
EDITOR’S NOTE:
Details on the issue that prompted this can be found by performing an Internet search on “Harry Knowles sexual assault”.
Posted by Woofer McWooferson in EDITORIALS, 0 comments
Happy 70th Birthday, Stephen King!

Happy 70th Birthday, Stephen King!

Buckle up, Constant Readers, because House of Tortured Souls is paying tribute to the father of contemporary horror – Stephen King. This post won’t be as long as one of Mr. King’s novels, but you might want to get a fresh beverage and a snack before continuing.
Comfy? Got your drink and snack? Good. Then follow us as we delve into a few of the memories Mr. King has given us. It’s not dark here – certainly not as dark as Pet Sematary – but you might want to keep a lamp burning. Just in case.Simpsons Opening-Stephen King / Fair use doctrine.

I’m His Number One Fan! Wait…

By Woofer McWooferson

I honestly can’t remember the details of my first exposure to Stephen King’s work, but I do remember that it changed my life. As a horror fan, I read everything horror that came my way. When someone mentioned this new writer and his book Carrie, I gave it a shot and have never looked back. I tore into everything that he wrote like a werewolf starved for human flesh and finding the tastiest morsel around. My family and friends were thrilled as they now had a guaranteed gift for the freaky kid – anything King.
horror-novel-thestand / Fair use doctrine.When The Stand was released, I was a freshman in high school. I snapped it up fast and read it in record time even for me. Those of you who’ve read The Stand (or seen the mini-series) know about Captain Tripps. You can imagine, then, how freaky it was for me when I caught a cold while enjoying it. Strangely, every subsequent reading also resulted in a cold. That’s a bit trippy, don’t you think? Later, when the unabridged version was released, I also snapped it up – and yes, I got another cold – and enjoyed it even more than the heavily cut original. Many Constant Readers have said they don’t care for the unabridged version as they feel it adds nothing to the story, but I have to respectfully disagree. King is the master of detail, and I found all the extra bits particularly satisfying. The Stand remains my favorite standalone King work.
The Gunslinger trade paperback / Fair use doctrine.And then The Gunslinger was released. My then-boyfriend, Rich, got an advanced release, read it, and passed it along for me to read. We both fell in love with Roland Deschain. Rich was as much of a horror fan as I was, and we shared many glorious King novels before eventually parting as a couple but remaining friends. But it was his gift to me of The Gunslinger that will always be most special. He started me on the road to the Tower and even accompanied me about halfway there. We’ve fallen out of touch, but I still think of him fondly and wonder what he thought of the rest of Roland’s tale. Did he love it as much as I did? How could he not?
Although I’ve read everything King’s written thus far, none have had the impact on me that The Stand and The Dark Tower did. Indeed, King’s influence on me was such that I found myself speaking of him during the oral portion of my master’s exam. I didn’t exactly plan to bring up King, and I wasn’t sure what the panel would think of my comparisons even as I spoke. He wasn’t exactly taught in college back then (at least not much outside of the composition classes I taught), after all, and I nervously smoked outside as the panel discussed me and my answers. Apparently, they found my comments valid because I did receive my MA. Thanks, Mr. King.
Today, I raise a glass to you and wish you the best. May you continue to fuel our nightmares for many more years to come. Happy birthday!

By Scarlett O

I was a mere tot when the adaptation of Stephen King’s The Shining came out in theaters in 1980; nevertheless, I was allowed to watch it before the age of ten. How times have changed! It was my very first horror movie, and I can honestly say without reservation that I’ve never been the same since. Both traumatized and intrigued, the level of terror that this particular movie held for me has set the standard for which I judge all horror movies. Needless to say, that’s a pretty high bar that few other horror films have been able to come close to clearing. As an adult, I read the actual book from which the movie is based and like all other good books, Stephen King’s The Shining reaches a level of impressive that I couldn’t have imagined in my worst nightmares. To this day, large hotels with seemingly endless hallways or hearing “REDRUM” gives me chills. As it should.The Shining - Bloody Elevator / Fair use doctrine.
Though there were clear differences between King’s novel and Stanley Kubrick’s direction of the film, such as the main character’s name (Jack vs John Daniel), physical appearances (blonde Wendy vs brunette), preference of cartoons by the boy Danny (Sesame Street vs the Road Runner), and even the hotel room number (217 vs 237), and perhaps the most interesting – that one ended in fire (the book) and the other in ice (the film), it’s obvious that readers and viewers alike could appreciate the artistic thrill of them both. Still, it should not go without mention that none of this would have been possible if the one and only Stephen King had not written the infamous novel in the first place.

By Michelle MIDI Sayles

On this day in 1947 a King was literally born – Stephen King that is!
It wasn’t until 42 years later that I discovered his literary world and my own thirst for horror grew in me, like a beast of its own.
I was 9 and at a slumber party with three other girls watching the VHS release of Pet Sematary. Unlike most girls, I didn’t hide under the blankets during the “scary parts” or scream. I just watched with amazement as Gage’s, Church’s, and Louis’ antics mesmerized me.Church-Pet Sematary_02 / Fair use doctrine.
I was so enamored with the film that I begged my parents for a month to buy me the novel for my 10th birthday, and I still have that battered and much loved copy to this day (after countless rereads).
From that moment, I was glued to all things King! I spent my teen years on a mere babysitter’s budget (choosing that and my studies over flipping burgers part time like most kids here). I would frequent yard sales and second-hand markets to find older but cheaper copies of King’s novels so I could stockpile all of his books (one day, when I retire, I will try and read any remaining that I have yet to tackle). I recorded each mini-series and film that came onto my screen to VHS, so I could watch it again and again (The Tommyknockers, The Stand, Children of the Corn -and sequels- etc). I clipped articles about my idol and more recently began collecting merchandise related to his works.
Through bad relationships, schooling, work life, having a family, and even suffering losses, King was my beacon. At any time, I could immerse myself in a book or film of his and just feel centered and at home.
Happy birthday, Mr King, I doubt you understand the impact you have had on many lives, but you’ll always be special in mine.MIDI's King collection

By Schock

The horror world wouldn’t be the same if not for author Stephen King. His novels – that seem to multiply like gremlins – and movies that spawned from his narratives have become a staple in the world of horror, terror, and suspense. When we hear the name Stephen King, we think only of monsters and twists that ensue within the stories he’s penned as well as the rich east coast New England area of his mind.
My first encounter with anything Stephen King was Carrie – the movie based on the novel that we have all come to know as an ultimate in psychological (and psychic) terror. I discovered at a young age my love for the underdog, but my apparent blood fetish spawned way later in life. That’s another story altogether… Carrie introduced me to the world of King and I wanted to dig a little deeper. I then discovered other movies based on his novels – Cujo, Christine, Children of the Corn, Thinner, Needful Things, Cat’s Eye, The Shining, Stand By Me, Pet Semetary, IT… The list goes on and on and on. Then there are the King short stories translated to film. My absolute favorite of these is “Sometimes They Come Back”. Obviously, if you can’t tell, I didn’t read a lot as a child; I threw down on the movies, though, and when I got older I discovered that the novels were actually pretty easy to find. So I began the hunt for as many as possible in my area.
Christine was the first book I acquired, and reading the book, I could feel what he was writing more so than the movie portrayed. So I wanted more. I wanted to see how the stories could just put fear and terror into people. The directors of the movies really shined a light on the stories with their films. Some of the novels, though, like IT are thicker than every version of the bible put together. My friends and I use to have an ongoing joke when we would discuss Stephen King movie and book comparisons. He used three pages just to describe the treads on the tires in From a Buick 8. That brings me to something that King inadvertently taught to those of us who are creators of art – whether it be prose, poetry, music, or the visual arts: detail is KEY to making sure you give the audience every inch of what your mind wants to get out. This was a beautiful thing to learn from King’s legacy of horror and terrifying tales.From A Buick 8 / Fair use doctrine.
If anyone deserves to be awarded the title King of Horror or Master of the Macabre, it is none other than Stephen King himself. King’s not a man who walks around mopey and weird as you’d expect a horror writer to be. He’s a regular man, a visionary, and an inspiration – and not only to filmmakers and fans. He has inspired now for decades, generations even, and will continue to inspire for many years to come. When we are all long gone from this earth and some weird alien life goes digging around, they’ll find one (or thirty) of his novels and be terrified at what they read. Let’s hope that one day this happens and Stephen King will be known to these people thousands of years from now as a God.Stephen King-Pet Sematary / Fair use doctrine.

Happy Birthday to the *King* of Horror

By Tammie Parker

horror-novel-firestarter / Fair use doctrine.I read Firestarter when I was 8! That truly did raise the bar pretty high for all trying to scare me from then on out. I had a tough childhood, this was written for me! OH, to have the power to set shit on fire!
A truly odd fact is that we read IT in English 101 in my 8th grade class!! A bit of an odd book to use to teach all about grammar, huh? We even watched the original movie right there in class.   horror-movie-it-original / Fair use doctrine.Although the monster at the end disappointed me, I loved the story and the build-up. I loved the goosebumps, the hair-raising, eye-bulging, hanging onto the bed rail, it’s-way-past-my-bedtime words!
After IT, (a few years down the road) I fall in love with Misery. horror-novel-misery / Fair use doctrine.The cockadoodie potty language definitely had me cracking up. Stephen King taught me how to find out when someone was going into my private stuff!
horror-novel-doloresclaiborne / Fair use doctrine.And then Dolores Claiborne. I truly loved the character Dolores! Having personally gone through 10 years of molestation, this novel was tough to read. However I wanted to read it through, I was certain I would be ecstatic with Dolores’ settling this chaos. I love how simple it is to travel into the story, Stephen completely takes you there. There is never a question of the color of the sky, the scent in the air, especially the creepy thing lurking around the corner.
Then came The Stand, which very rapidly became my favorite book.
horror-novel-thestand / Fair use doctrine.Stephen is probably the source of my love for dystopian horror. The Stand opened my eyes to so much! Scenarios I had never thought of before. Human characteristics and how we would react, and what we would become if/when something happens.
After that (again a few years down the road) Dark Tower novels, WOWZA what a story!!
I have YET to see the movie, but I love the cast! And the trailers look absolutely amazing!

I have read Desperation, The Dead Zone, and, well, it is safe to say Mr. King is my most read author. During my research, I found out that Stephen and his wife Tabitha actually stayed in the real Stanley Hotel as he wrote the novel! I fell in love with him all over again. What a true badass! And what a wicked imagination 🙂
Happy 70th, Mr. Nightmare Maker!

What Stephen King Has Meant To Me

By Dixielord

Stephen King's Full DarkI discovered Stephen King sometime around the mid 80s. I don’t remember exactly when, about my senior year in high school or maybe my first year in college. I remember a high school friend/acquaintance was reading Christine, and me, to my utter shame now, thought reading a book that big was the nerdiest thing in the world. How things change.
Christinebecame one of the first King novels, probably THE first novel, that I read. I think Night Shift was the first book, followed by Skeleton Crew, as I fell quickly in love with his short stories. I devoured his short stories rabidly, as quickly as I could get my hands on them. Then I started on the novels – Christine, Carrie, Firestarter, everything my college library had to offer, including the non-fiction Danse Macabre. It was through Danse Macabre that I became aware of H.P. Lovecraft.
Is it fair to say my life was changed? It was changed, dear readers. I had transformed from someone who laughed at readers to a voracious reader, from a man who had never heard of Lovecraft to a hardcore fan of the Cthulhu mythos and the unspeakable horrors from beyond.
Out of college I continued to follow him, buying his books when I could afford to, checking them out of the local library when I couldn’t. I built up a nice collection of hardcover King over the years. After his near-fatal accident, his stories changed, and my life changed as well. I lost my mother to cancer, and his books started taking on a more depressing (at least to me) tone. The recurring theme of God demanding a sacrifice started to wear thin on me, and I just recently realized why. Don’t get me wrong, his writing was still top notch, but I couldn’t take the new stuff. I stopped reading King altogether after Desperation. I still cherished my King collection, though, and it nearly killed me when I had to sell them.
Sell your King collection? Blasphemy! Sadly, life doesn’t always go as planned, and losing my job with no employment in sight meant I needed money. Of all the books I owned, I hated putting up my King collection for sale. But someone offered me too much money, and I needed money too much. I said goodbye with tears in my eyes.
I came back to King, and I’m still coming back, going back for the books I missed and grabbing the new ones as well. Now, new fans are discovering Stephen King, and old fans are rediscovering him. IT is in the theaters, reinvigorating horror in general, and putting the master’s name back on the lips of everyone. The Dark Tower is just out of theaters. All of this has brought me back to my books, thinking about reacquiring the ones I had to sacrifice. King changed my life. Stephen King gave me a life, he gave me books and made me a reader. He opened worlds after worlds.

By Brenda Wilder Antlitz

Carrie-Sissy Spacek-John Travolta / Fair use doctrine.I was first introduced to the King, Stephen King that is, in the winter of 1976, the year that Carrie, came out. I was 12 at the time and in junior high school, which meant that 1) every girl was in love with John Travolta, and 2) I was too young to see it in the theater. So after hearing all of the cool kids telling us about the movie, especially the ending when the hand comes out of the ground, I knew I had to see it! But what was I going to do? And then I knew. I would do the next best thing: go to the bookstore.
The bookstore experience was just as exciting – walking down the aisle of the horror section, smelling the scent of new books under the incandescent lights, and looking for the name Stephen King. Even his name sounded grand! As I walked, I looked and looked, then and there it was: Carrie. I quickly opened it up, flipped through the pages, my hair flying back, as I watch the words fly past me, and I then floated to the register where I paid and become the proud owner of my very first (but certainly not last) Stephen King novel!
When I got home, I got a bottle of Coca-cola and went straight up to my bedroom (my safe haven), and I began to read Carrie. It was in the early afternoon when I began reading, and I only stopped to go to the bathroom, which I did with all lights on of course! LOL. But I simply could not stop reading it… I could relate Carrie White. Completely.
I felt as if Stephen King saw through me and wrote this character about me (except that I did not have special psychic abilities nor a crazy, religious fanatic for a mother). I was a very shy loner, misunderstood and bullied so bad that my only escape was through books, TV, music, and movies. And so, because of Carrie White, I became a horror lover and not just of the Friday the 13th kind but of the psychological kind. The kind that makes you think – and question – EVERYthing!!
After that, I was hooked on The King of Horror!
Stephen King became known not only for his novels and their adaptations to the big screen but also for the works that made it to the small screen, TV. You have to realize that back then we only had a handful of TV stations. Cable was new (we did not have it), and VCRs were just starting to come out although few could afford them, yet. So when there was a movie of the week, or better yet a mini-series, it was a big deal! An event, even.
'Salem's Lot / Fair use doctrine.The first major Stephen King-based mini-series was a two-night event, and it’s still talked about to this day. ‘Salems Lot, staring David Soul and Lance Kerwin, debuted on 11/17/1979, and it was something we’d never seen before. A second ‘Salem’s Lot mini-series (remake not sequel) debuted on 11/19/2015 and starred Rob Lowe, who played Nick Andros in the mini-series of The Stand. If you ask people what they remember about it, they will tell you that it scared the crap out of them.'Salem's Lot mini-series remake / Fair use doctrine.
I could go on and on with the list of books and movies, that Stephen King has written, but there is not enough time or room.
All I can say is this: there are writers who affect only a few, and Stephen King is not one of them. Stephen King has affected generations! He is the reason why most of us became fans of horror/thrillers, became writers – authors, even – readers, and film fans. For me, not only did he do all of the above, but he also was an influence on my becoming a paranormal investigator.
I guess all that is left to say, besides “Thank You”, is happy birthday to The King of Horror, Mr. Stephen King!!
From House of Tortured Souls to you, Mr. King, fangs for everything.horror-stephenking / Fair use doctrine.
Posted by Woofer McWooferson in CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS, EDITORIALS, HORROR HEROES, TRIBUTE, 0 comments
EDITORIAL: In Defense of: Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 (2000)

EDITORIAL: In Defense of: Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 (2000)

Hello, horror fiends. In my new series “In Defense Of…”, I look at movies often loathed, you know, those fugly, redheaded, stepchildren in the genre. But are they really worth the hate? After all, a lot of now classic horror films were once looked down upon by other like-minded genre fans. Day of the Dead (1985) is a prime example. So all I ask is your time and open mind because you never know, you might just see a movie in a totally new light.
Oscar nominated director Joe Berlinger seemed like an interesting choice when it was announced he would helm the sequel to the mega hit The Blair Witch Project. Berlinger is known for award winning documentaries such as Brother’s Keeper and the hugely successful Paradise Lost trilogy. He is currently directing a project about Ted Bundy (Zac Efron is slated to play Bundy).

Opening Statement or Sequels Don’t Always Suck

For my first film, I want to look at the ill-fated sequel to the smash hit The Blair Witch Project (1999). Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 was looked at by many fans as a quickly slapped together film to keep the Blair Witch money train chugging along. But it’s really not the cinematic turd we unfairly dismiss it as. I’m going to use the term ballsy a lot because that is exactly what the Joe Berlinger was when attempting to tackle the sequel to the huge runaway hit the first Blair Witch was. He could have taken the easy route and simply sent another batch of kids in the woods screaming and looking into the camera and sobbing etc., but he didn’t. Instead, he chose to take the template of the first film and do what a good sequel should do, which is expand the mythos and take the series in a different direction.

Studio Interference

When defending Blair Witch 2, you have to have some context. The director’s vision of Blair Witch 2 is totally different than what we see in the final product all thanks to studio interference. For example, key scenes were re-arranged along with additional violent scenes, etc. It was further confused by adding Book of Shadows to the title when, in fact, there is no book in the movie. That, my friends, was – you guessed it – the studio suits’ bright idea and not the director’s. On a side note, I’ve heard of fans making their own “director’s cut” versions using details from the shooting script and listening to the commentary. (SERIOUSLY, the commentary is amazing. You must listen to it. ), and (surprise, surprise) it’s much better. Sadly, the odds of seeing an official director’s cut is slim because Artisan (now Lions Gate) doesn’t really do a lot to cater to fans. Even The Blair Witch Project (1999), a film that put them on the map, didn’t get a tenth-anniversary release because I guess they figured why bother.

What Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 Got Right

After viewing last year’s stinkfest which was Blair Witch, it only reinforced the idea that Blair Witch 2, for all its flaws, at least attempted to explore interesting themes and ideas. Not only does it all but ditch the whole found footage concept, which is pretty ballsy in and of itself, it is a clever take on Luigi Pirandello’s Six Characters in Search of an Author. Each character in Book of Shadows represents an aspect of the film. Jeff is the opportunist cashing in on the film; Kim is the goth girl who was drawn into the film’s dark themes and subject matter; Tristine and her husband are the brainy skeptics; and Erica is the Wiccan who found the film to be offensive to the witch community. Again this is so much more interesting than simply another batch of kids going off into the woods… God, I hate Blair Witch (2016).
In short, Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 is much more lofty than the remake/rehash we got last year. With the filmmaker’s background in documentary film, he explores blurring the lines between fiction and reality and the very real danger in doing so. Also, the cliché imagery throughout is purposefully placed because the young people are so steeped in media that it’s the only way they relate to things once shit gets weird. The fact that The Blair Witch Project exists (in the sequel’s context) as a work of fiction rather than a part of its own universe is another incredibly ballsy move and helps to further echo its core theme while also giving an interesting slice of meta. Its cast is solid and the pacing moves at nearly breakneck speed. It also has a pretty good soundtrack which is now nostalgic for people of my generation.

Closing Statement or Before You Pass Judgment

I’m the first person to admit Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2 is flawed largely due to studio tampering, but it doesn’t deserve the 4.0 rating on IMDb! It attempted to give the audience something a little more challenging than simply a run of the mill cash grab remake (which, AGAIN, Blair Witch (2016) totally was) by introducing interesting themes and concepts. Thankfully, I’m not alone in my respect for this film, and it seems other fans are coming out of the woods and proudly reclaiming Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2. I still hold out hope that Lions Gate will release a director’s cut to allow fans to see the film as the filmmaker intended.
Michael Vaughn is a published genre writer and has appeared in Fangoria, Scream (UK) in print as well as sites like FilmsinReview.com. He also owns the blog “Gorehound Mike’s Weird Cinema”. Currently, he has a book coming out entitled The Ultimate Guide to Strange Cinema, which compiles over 300 reviews spanning films from all over the globe and covering multiple genres.
Posted by Mike Vaughn in Categories, EDITORIALS, 0 comments
COMING SOON: American Horror Story: Cult (5 September 2017)

COMING SOON: American Horror Story: Cult (5 September 2017)

A Look At American Horror Story: Cult

Okay, okay, okay – American Horror Story: Cult is coming! So, with this last trailer they have released, I have put together that a political figure (with shady past, looks like she murdered someone) has a fear of clowns, someone a tad upset over the murder is out for revenge and royal pisses in her fruit loops!
I had to blurt that our first. Many of my fellow AHS fans having been wondering if the clowns in the sneak peeks were a representation of the circus act going on in the White House. I say YEP, but they do pull off the clown plot in the story.
For example, this poster could easily be seen as all the red states and a lone blue in the mix. And I did pick up on the hints of a hive-like cult suggestion from that poster of the female clown with skull open and a bee hive where a brain should be and the beehive pattern of the background. In one of the trailers, a mass of bees fly out the mouth of the clown at center of circle.

And the symbol, sometimes it is unclear as to how many sides it has, could easily be the Pentagon (maybe Sarah works there), but it’s sometimes shown in the trailers more as symbol of beehive.
From the commercials, it seems more put together than “Roanoke”, and with much more Evan Peters (for that fact alone, you have my full attention ;-)), so already more people are interested in this season! I do not have Coulrophobia personally but tons do, so this season will certainly keep many peeking at the TV screen from under a blanket while holding tightly onto their teddy bear. An absolutely brilliant move by Ryan Murphy and Brad Fulchak! Fans did, after all, shout out their disappointment in “Roanoke”.
I, myself, was not a fan of the show until the trailer for season 5. Lady Gaga walking down a creepy hotel hallway as a Countess had me hooked! I’m not even a fan of Lady Gaga, but that scene was absolutely perfect, and I was dying to see if she pulled the role off as she appeared to be perfect for it. I soon after started a Facebook group for the show Fans of AHS. We have group chat during the airing of each show, and all mention of that episode is kept in the chat until two days after because our friends across the pond do not get to watch the same day as those of us in the US. I was thrilled for the most part, the ending of that season did disappoint me, and I was ‘meh’ for several scenes, but I did binge shortly after starting the group. I loved “Murder House” and “Coven” was pretty good as well. “Asylum” and “Freak Show”, however, could not capture my attention. I do love Twisty though. 🙂 I will speak more of him in an upcoming clown article I have planned for House of Tortured Souls. I quickly discovered I am in love with Evan Peters! I am aware that so are thousands of others, but I will warn you I am a big gal and stubborn AF.
For the most part, I love American Horror Story. We certainly needed a horror show, and we most definitely needed one that switched it up every season. I am LOVING the clowns in the trailers. They look phenomenal (and appear to be scary as hell – especially for those with a fear of clowns), and their cult dances set up the anticipation nicely, and I have my finger crossed that they pull it off smoothly and AHS: Cult be my new favorite season. 🙂
American Horror Story: Cult premieres on 5 September 2017, so get your snacks and security blanket ready – and happy viewing!
Posted by Tammie Parker in EDITORIALS, HORROR SERIES, TELEVISION REVIEWS, 0 comments
In Remembrance:  Tobe Hooper

In Remembrance: Tobe Hooper

Tobe Hooper didn’t just change the face of horror, I credit (or blame, depending on who you talk to) him with changing the direction of my life. I don’t say that lightly. Not many movies or directors have impacted me as much as his films.
I grew up during the video rental craze of the 80s. I also grew up in a house where horror wasn’t a popular genre. So anytime we went to the local video rental place, I would always browse the horror section looking at all the boxes of all the movies that I would rent if only my mom would let me.
Not too many of those boxes stood out or left a lasting impression on me. Except two. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre was the first of those two. It was like the Holy Grail of horror movies in my opinion. Even when my parents started letting me rent scary movies, they always told me “No” when it came to that one. I still remember the first time I got the okay to rent The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. It was a defining moment in my young, impressionable life. It also changed my life forever.
Up until that point I had not seen a lot of horror, and a lot of what I had seen was pretty straightforward stuff. Universal classics, 70s Hammer horror, and Roger Corman cheapies. I had no idea what I was getting into when I popped in the video tape after everyone else in the house had gone to bed.
This was the first movie that caught me by surprise. It blew me away. I had never seen anything like that before. The brutality and the stark tone set it apart from anything I had ever seen before. I remember rewinding and re-watching scenes over and over. For a movie with very little blood, it came across as one of the most gut-wrenching watches I had seen up until then.
That was the moment I knew that I wasn’t going to just be a fan of horror. I was going to be one of those “horror people”.
After that, I knew I had to seek out the other works of Mr. Hooper. I watched every single one I could find. Poltergeist and Salem’s Lot both left lasting impressions on me. The Fun House and Lifeforce were enjoyable and interesting. But nothing seemed to grab my attention with the same force as the original The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.
It’s a fair bet that no movie will ever have the same impact on me as The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. And as much as I wanted to discuss how much I loved Poltergeist and The Apartment Complex, I really don’t think anything I could say will compare to how I feel about that one film.
Although I never met the man, I feel as though his contribution to entertainment helped shape who I am. His legend and legacy will live on in all of the filmmakers that continue to be inspired by his work.
Posted by Richard Francis in EDITORIALS, HORROR HEROES, 0 comments
MEMORIAL: Dave Brockie

MEMORIAL: Dave Brockie

Dave Brockie was born August 30, 1963, and passed away on March 23, 2014. We knew him best as Oderus Urungus, lead vocalist of the shock rock extreme metal band Gwar, but he also assumed the role of vocalist and bass player in bands such as X-Cops and Dave Brockie Experience (DBX).
Dave Brockie/Oderus UrungusDave Brockie left a legacy that took Shock Rock and turned into something of a spectacle. In the beginning of the conception of Gwar, the band saw a lot of flack from the music. Bands like Alice Cooper, Kiss, David Bowie, and Black Sabbath had long embraced their dark sides and employed theatrics in stage performances. Gwar, though, took it to a level that defied all that had been seen before. Gwar literally redefined the concept of theatrical musical performances designed to shock and entertain people. Remaining as the only original member of Gwar before his passing, this legacy truly brought fans something to anticipate and admire whenever the name Gwar was uttered.
Personally, I have seen Gwar 13 times in my life, and I’ll see them every time they come around. During Dave Brockie’s time on earth and as Oderus Urungus, he seriously was the best front man of any band I have ever seen live – and believe me I have seen a LOT of bands in my time. He had a charisma that immediately inspired the crowd to go wild. Not only could he actually sing and had an amazing voice, his on stage antics brought weren’t just for the audience’s amusement. Gwar and Brockieincluded fans in the show, and the fans loved it. From the decapitation of presidential figures and celebrities to jerking his cuttle fish and covering, no…layering the audience in blood, bile, and whatever else they come up with, Gwar always left the audience satisfied. This, partnered with the giant earthworm that ate an audience member (and who knows what happened after that), guaranteed a truly memorable show.
A Gwar show was purely amazing on multiple levels, but when I reflect on all the times I have seen Gwar, I realize the extent to which Oderus fueled that. Gwar, both as a whole and as individual artists, are extremely talented, and original Beefcake, Michael Bishop, ultimately assumed the role of the lead vocalist as Blothar – knowing full well that he had some big shoes to fill after Brockie’s untimely death. Having seen Gwar with Blothar on lead vocals three times now, I can say with confidence that they are still Gwar and are making Dave/Oderusproud. Speaking of which, they have a new album coming out soon titled The Blood of the Gods set for release later this year. House of Tortured Souls will, of course, be reviewing it, so don’t forget to check back for that.
Dave Brockie Experience - Diarrhea of a MadmanBack to Dave Brockie. I also recall getting the opportunity to see DBX live many (many many MANY) years ago at some hole in Muncie, Indiana. Being low key like that, without the entire hullabaloo of Gwar, was a real treat. It was just Dave Brockie and the rest of his band in action – the stripped down, punk rock, roots style. It was an honor just to be in the audience – the jokes didn’t stop, the talent was immense, and the showmanship was godlike. Dave Brockie was not only immensely talented, the best showman in all of rock n’ roll, and a lyrical genius, he was also a genuinely nice guy to everyone he met. I had the opportunity to shake his hand during this DBX performance, and that was better than meeting any other famous person. His friends loved him with a love that could move mountains, which can be seen if you watch the Gwar-B-Q following his death. Just watching through the computer touched my heart with some super strength as the love for Davewas evident and overwhelming. We can say that he was not only loved and cherished, but he was also idolized for his music, his art, and himself as a human – and as an alien overlord who brutally murdered the Republican party and the douche bags that plague this world.
Today, we here at House of Tortured Souls celebrate the day that Dave Brockie/Oderus Urungus was gifted to the world. We encourage you to pop in a Gwar, DBX, or X-Copsalbum and bask in the beauty that was Dave Brockie’s amazing talent. His legacy and creativity will never die as long Gwar keeps going, as long as we not only support the underground music scene that Dave Brockie held close to his heart, and as long as we keep the horror alive! Dave/Oderus, we in the underground love you, brother. You inspired us all to be creative and to push boundaries in what we do. I can honestly say that without you here, life is not the same. We miss you, we will always miss you, but you are still alive in our hearts.
If you wish to follow Gwar, buy merchandise, or see them on tour and whatever else going on in the world of the Scumdogs of the Universe, visit GWAR ONLINE.
Posted by Schock in EDITORIALS, EXCLUSIVE, HORROR NEWS, MUSIC REVIEWS, 1 comment
In Remembrance: Tobe Hooper

In Remembrance: Tobe Hooper

Tobe Hooper: Gone But Not Forgotten

It is with heavy heart that we report the passing of the ever so great Tobe Hooper – the man who brought us many, MANY great horror flicks, such as The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, Poltergeist, The Fun House, Lifeforce, Salem’s Lot, and Toolbox Murders – among others. His legacy of horror films are what spawned fear and intrigue on several levels for all of us here at House of Tortured Souls. We will be paying tribute to him, so stay tuned to find out how his work has influenced our work and our lives.
Here’s a list of his directorial credits alone:
  • Djinn (2013)
  • Destiny Express Redux (2009)
  • Masters of Horror (TV Series) – “The Damned Thing” (2006)
  • Masters of Horror (TV Series) – “Dance of the Dead” (2005)
  • Mortuary (2005)
  • Toolbox Murders (2004)
  • Taken (TV Mini-Series) (1 episode) – “Beyond the Sky” (2002)
  • Night Visions (TV Series) (2 episodes) – “Cargo” (2002)
  • Night Visions (TV Series) (2 episodes) – “The Maze” (2002)
  • Crocodile (Video) (2000)
  • The Others (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Souls on Board” (2000)
  • Dark Skies (TV Series) (1 episode) – “The Awakening” (1996)
  • Nowhere Man (TV Series) (2 episodes) – “Turnabout” (1995)
  • Nowhere Man (TV Series) (2 episodes) – “Absolute Zero” (1995)
  • The Apartment Complex (TV Movie) (1999)
  • Prey (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Hungry for Survival”: Unaired Pilot (1998)
  • Perversions of Science (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Panic” (1997)
  • The Mangler (1995)
  • Body Bags (TV Movie) (segment “Eye”) (1993)
  • Night Terrors (1993)
  • Tales from the Crypt (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Dead Wait” (1991)
  • Haunted Lives: True Ghost Stories (TV Mini-Series documentary) (1 episode) – “Ghosts R Us/Legend of Kate Morgan/School Spirit” (1991)
  • I’m Dangerous Tonight (TV Movie) (1990)
  • Spontaneous Combustion (1990)
  • Freddy’s Nightmares (TV Series) (1 episode) – “No More Mr. Nice Guy” (1988)
  • The Equalizer (TV Series) (1 episode) – “No Place Like Home” (1988)
  • Amazing Stories (TV Series) (1 episode) – “Miss Stardust” (1987)
  • The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986)
  • Invaders from Mars (1986)
  • Lifeforce (1985)
  • Billy Idol: Dancing with Myself (Video short) (1983)
  • Poltergeist (1982)
  • The Fun House (1981)
  • Salem’s Lot (TV Movie) (1979)
  • The Dark (replaced by John Cardos, uncredited) (1979)
  • Eaten Alive (1976)
  • The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
  • Eggshells (1969)
  • The Heisters (Short) (1964)
Now, pop in a classic, grab your favorite snack, and celebrate the scares that he gave us.

Poster Gallery of Some of Tobe Hooper’s Films

Click for larger image.
Posted by Schock in Categories, EDITORIALS, HORROR HEROES, TRIBUTE, 0 comments
Piece of My Mind: Is There Room for Fun Horror Anymore?

Piece of My Mind: Is There Room for Fun Horror Anymore?

Is There Room for Fun Horror Anymore?

Brain Damage poster / Fair use doctrine.Frank Henenlotter’s seminal 80s horror film Brain Damage made its Blu-ray debut this past spring, it further remained me of those bygone days when horror films were fun and not bleak and frankly depressing. Sure, I’m glad that the genre is maturing, and films like Baskin are, in part, brilliant for their stark brutal and sobering aspects. But along the way have we lost the fun in these films?
Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 poster / Fair use doctrine.Why does everyone love the 80s? If you ask any fan why they recall so fondly the horror of the 80s they`ll most likely say because they had a fun, even wackiness, to them. They were horrific without being mean spirited. Just imagine Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 without the over the top humor and gore mixed with biting satire? And when you stack Chopping MallChopping Mall poster / Fair use doctrine. up with say Martyrs, I know which one I`d like to visit again and again. Even when filmmakers dealt with heavy subjects, they kept things enjoyable. House poster / Fair use doctrine.A prime example is House the movie. House tackled the subject of Vietnam and PTSD but added an almost cartoon like element which balanced it and kept it enjoyable to watch. It didn’t lessen the impact of the central themes, i.e. war and its effects on the participants; it just made it entertaining.

The Cabin in the Woods and the Return of Fun Horror?

The Cabin in the Woods poster / Fair use doctrine.Thankfully, I see a return to horror with a spark of light heartiness. The Cabin in the Woods was a breath of fresh air, because not only was it a smart sardonic take on the genre it also let itself have that 80s snarkiness. Another great example is the 2015 heavy metal horror gem Deathgasm poster / Fair use doctrine.Deathgasm. With its Sam Raimi-esque style, it straddles the line between horror and way out gags (some gross out, of course), and it makes me misty-eyed for those bygone days. Even the wonderful surprise hit Get Out deals out equal thought-provoking satire and topical issues with humor, giving the film a great balance and a better rewatchable trait.
In closing, don’t get me wrong, I’m all for horror that takes itself seriously because it’s a genre that all too often gets scoffed by alleged serious film buffs, but when it’s so grueling I feel like I want to slit my wrists, maybe it’s time to lighten up a bit. Thankfully, though, I see a return to less brutal (subject wise) films and more of what I loved from the 80s and early 90s, which is horror that was gory, goopy, and sometimes neon-tinted but not really mean-spirited. But that’s just a Piece of My Mind.
Michael Vaughn is a published genre writer and has appeared in Fangoria, Scream (UK) in print as well as sites like Films in Review.com. He also owns the blog Gorehound Mike’s Weird Cinema. Currently, he has a book coming out entitled The Ultimate Guide to Strange Cinema which compiles over 300 reviews spanning films from all over the globe and covering multiple genres.
Posted by Mike Vaughn in Categories, EDITORIALS, 0 comments
TRIBUTE: GEORGE A. ROMERO (4 of ?)

TRIBUTE: GEORGE A. ROMERO (4 of ?)

Georgette Romero Meets George A. Romero

What can be said about George Romero that you have not already read. He is the Godfather of Zombies……he paved the way for others……he was brilliant. No, you have heard this I am sure and they are all true.
I want to share a personal moment I had with this kind man. For those who don’t know I love zombies. Have for 20+ years so it is no wonder that George Romero is my hero. Night of the Living Dead will always be my favorite zombie/ghoul movie. (FYI, George called them ghouls or flesh eaters back them) I had never cosplayed in my life but decided one year I wanted to get in on the fun. When I sat down to think of what I wanted to be, literally the first thing I thought of was my idol George Romero.
I had plans to meet him at Scarefest Convention in Lexington, KY, and thought “This is perfect!” When I looked online for ideas I found none. It was crazy. This man is a legend yet from what I could tell no one had done it. I swore right then that I would do it and by god I would do it right. I looked for the perfect frames, the perfect shirt, the perfect vest, perfect everything. I was happy with what I came up with and wore it with pride to meet him. I even wore a name tag that said “My name is Georgette Romero.”
Fair use doctrine.
As I was standing in his line, awestruck to even be looking at him, his manager/agent pointed me out and couldn’t tell me enough how great I looked. She had never seen it. When I got to him I was speechless and he was in awe of my cosplay. He said himself he had never seen anyone dress as him and it was amazing. He loved it. Can you believe it… My idol loved my cosplay of him? I could have died. He signed my VHS copy of Dawn of the Dead that Tom Savini had signed a few years earlier. After that, he insisted on pictures. His smile was genuine. It was his idea to even switch glasses for a few of the pictures. That’s right, I wore George Romero’s glasses.
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In my glasses
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After we switched glasses
It was amazing and I will forever miss him. He was one of a kind and can never be replaced.
Happy nightmares, Mr. Romero, may you be at peace or come back as one of your own kind.
Posted by ZombieGurl in Categories, EDITORIALS, TRIBUTE, 0 comments
TRIBUTE: GEORGE A. ROMERO (3 of ?)

TRIBUTE: GEORGE A. ROMERO (3 of ?)

RIP George A. Romero

“They’re coming to get you, Barbara.”
It’s maybe one of the most famous, and chilling lines in horror. From one of the most groundbreaking movies in the history of horror cinema, Night of the Living Dead by director George A. Romero. We lost George this week, and it’s a loss that has shaken the world of horror. If you are a newer horror fan, maybe you don’t know the name, but you should. Maybe you’re a fan of The Walking Dead, but not really a horror fan, well you should know Mr. Romero’s name. The modern zombie only exists because of George A. Romero.
Before Romero, zombies were basically lumbering, undead servants. Their menace was limited to lurching about, choking, and throwing their victims. They were creatures of Caribbean folklore that might strike fear into the superstitious locals but not so much on the big screen. George Romero changed all that; he took the shambling undead and instilled them with one of our great taboos: cannibalism. Now Romero has famously said he had no intention of making a zombie movie, no thoughts of forever changing horror history. Whatever his intentions, that’s exactly what he did. Over the years zombies have evolved and changed, brain-eating, running zombies, rage zombies, virus zombies, but none of that would have been possible without Romero. Every zombie film, from 28 Days Later to Return of the Living Dead, every TV show from The Walking Dead to iZombie, every video game from Resident Evil to Lollipop Chainsaw, every damn one can trace its existence back to Mr. Romero.
Romero was more than just Night of the Living Dead. He followed this game changer with another classic, Dawn of the Dead. Years later he continued with Day of the Dead. Then, when everyone thought he was finished, he launched his big budget Land of the Dead and then came back with the much maligned (unfairly, in my opinion) Diary of the Dead. Outside the zombie subgenre, he created horror classics such as Creepshow, Martin, and The Dark Half, cult favorites like Knight Riders and The Crazies, and the occasional misfire like Season of the Witch and Survival of the Dead.
But that’s all about his movies. There have probably been a thousand articles, blogs, and news stories about Romero’s movies and his importance to horror. There could easily be 1,000 more, most of them better than anything I could write about his legacy. Nah, I really want to talk about the man and my encounters with him. Now I won’t lie and insult the hard core fans of the dead series. That’s not fair to them. As much as I love his zombie classics, I was never the biggest fan by any means, and he wasn’t my favorite director. However, if Romero did a movie, I watched it, and usually I enjoyed it. So I passed up a chance to meet him at least once. Mostly because I absolutely hated waiting in line, and at conventions George Romero always had a line. I’m glad I overcame that to meet the man once.
The first time I saw him in real life was at the Horrorfind convention in Hunt Valley, Maryland. It was around 2006 or 2007. I was sitting by the pool with friends late in the evening just after dark. We were joking, chatting and drinking adult beverages and someone noticed him and poked me. I looked and there he was. He was so much taller than I had imagined from seeing him on television and in photos. He towered above the person he was talking too, wearing, as best I can remember a dark green or teal shirt and slacks, and the vest, and the coke bottle glasses. He didn’t look like a man who had changed horror forever. He looked more like a hippie with his long, graying ponytail, but you felt his presence. It was only a brief passing moment, but you knew you were in the vicinity of horror royalty. This was someone who redefined the genre.
I didn’t “officially” meet him that year. It was a year or two later, at the Full Moon Tattoo and Horror Festival in Nashville, TN. I went with the full intention of meeting him, but once again the line was unbelievable. Rightfully so. And I talked myself out of it. Luckily, I really wanted to meet him, so I kept popping by. Finally. I found the line had gotten shorter, so I jumped in. Only to find the line was short because George had went out to lunch and a lot of people had wandered off. Oh, ye of little patience, yeah I was impatient, too, but I made myself sit there on the floor in line until finally we got the word he was back. The line quickly refilled and started slowly moving. When we finally got to the table, we realized the line moved slow because the man, the master, the godfather of horror, didn’t rush his fans.
Finally we got up to the table (me and my new line buddies), and there he was. The same vest, same glasses and ponytail, but he was smiling, laughing, and looking at his fans with genuine affection. It was the same when we introduced ourselves to him. He laughed at our jokes, smiled and asked where we were from. I had picked out a photo of him and Simon Pegg. He was about to sign, and he stopped, pointed at Simon and said, “That young man is going places”. We shook hands and got a photo with him at his table. This was back before they were called selfies, and when most celebs, including George, didn’t charge for photos.
I met George a couple other times, always with friends. Every time was like the first time. George A. Romero, the father of the zombie movie, always smiling, usually laughing, always looking at his fans with a genuine love and appreciation. That’s how I will always remember Mr. Romero. As wonderful as his films were, he was so much more. That’s what I will take with me.
Posted by Allen Alberson in EDITORIALS, TRIBUTE, 0 comments
TRIBUTE: GEORGE A. ROMERO (2 of ?)

TRIBUTE: GEORGE A. ROMERO (2 of ?)

RIP – The Godfather of Zombies
George A. Romero

georgeromero-zombielove / Fair use doctrine.George Romero meant so much to me personally. He created my love, my obsession with zombies. I cannot tell you my exact age when I first watched Night of the Living Dead, but it sparked the fire that is my love for horror and, more importantly, zombie stories. George A. Romero opened the door for many to follow, pushed the limits of horror further than anyone dreamed, awakened future directors and storytellers, and educated the world on the zombies (how they move, groan, react, and how people would react in a zombie apocalypse).
I’m not sure if Romero went for black and white to blend in with the classic horrors or because makeup and prosthetics aren’t what they are today. All I know that it was a genius move! Night of the Living Dead was meant to be b&w. When I first turned on the movie (in my foolish youth) I wanted to immediately change the channel, after all b&w movies are just boring (back in the 80s when everything was neon). I’m not even sure now what kept me watching, but I am ever so thankful! George Romero was such a creative intelligent fellow in his time.
Romero was one of my first articles for HoTS when a little over a year ago Mr. Romero finally received a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. It blew my mind that only just now was he receiving a star! After all his movies and work?!?!? Night of the Living Dead had several sequels (almost all 10 years apart), and he made several other type of horror movies, directed much of Creepshow, and participated in many documentaries, and specials. Romero is so loved by so many that The Walking Dead has had many tribute Easter eggs to Romero.
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Romero even had a part in the zombie mode on Call of Duty: Black Ops.

George Romero left his mark and ‘infected’ so many of us. I, personally, will truly miss him.
Posted by Tammie Parker in EDITORIALS, FAMILY HORROR, FEATURED CONTENT, Historic Horror, HORROR HEROES, HORROR NEWS, IN THE SPOTLIGHT, OBITUARY, STAFF PICKS, TRIBUTE, 0 comments
TRIBUTE: GEORGE A. ROMERO (1 of ?)

TRIBUTE: GEORGE A. ROMERO (1 of ?)

Remembering George A. Romero

George A. Romero, as many of you know by now, passed on Sunday, July 16, asleep in his own bed. Romero had a small but aggressive bout with cancer, but that is said not to be the cause of his death. Romero was 77.
When one thinks of zombies these days, sadly, most think of The Walking Dead and believe this to be the greatest zombie representation in film (or TV). Not to take anything away from the abundance of talent that goes into making TWD, but if you were to ask its main man Greg Nicotero who he himself was inspired by (as well as any true horror and or zombie fan) and who is the master and father of the modern zombie, you’ll get the same answer from them all. That name would be legendary filmmaker George A. Romero.
George A. Romero was born in New York City in 1940. After graduating school, George made many short film and did some commercial work as well. He and friends formed IMAGE TEN PRODUCTIONS where they all chipped in about $10,000.00 each to produce and direct a black and white horror film that became an instant horror classic and a legend among all zombie film to ever be made: Night of the Living Dead (1968).
Romero went on to write, direct, produce, and even act in more than a combined 78 films. Films titles such as The Crazies (2010/1972), Diary of the Dead (2007), Night of the Living Dead 3D (2006), Land of the Dead (2004), Creepshow (1982), Dawn of the Dead (1978), and many more.
George A. Romero was always known for his trademark thick rimmed black frame glasses and safari vest. But, more so, was always known for being a warmhearted man who always cared and took the time for his fans. I personally wasn’t fortunate enough to have met Romero at any of the conventions that he had attended as a celebrity guest, but I always heard from those who did that he was a very personable and kind man.
The legendary horror/zombie films that Romero made in his lifetime were inspiring to future filmmakers and loved by audiences across the globe. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead became the standard for all other zombie films. All, in some way, seemed to be compared to that of Romero, but none ever seem to make the same impact. While Romero’s films were always full of great gore, blood, and BRAINS(!!!!), the films always had great stories. They were always driven by characters whose main goal was to survive among the dead for their life. And it always worked!
Mr. Romero, you have been inspiring, admired, respected, loved, and now, most of all, missed.
On behalf of myself, John Roisland, founder and CEO of House of Tortured Souls, thank you, sir, for all the memories you have given to all of us.
Keep It Evil.
Posted by John Roisland in EDITORIALS, 0 comments
In Remembrance of Bill Paxton

In Remembrance of Bill Paxton

Bill Paxton was a tough loss… He will forever be a cinema icon.
I am honored to be given the opportunity to write about the life and career of Bill Paxton and to say some final words in remembrance of one of my favorite actor/directors.
Born on this day in 1955 and raised a good ol’ boy in Fort Worth, Texas, Bill first wanted to make movies but not necessarily star in them. His desire was reinforced by his father who supported his children’s imaginative and artistic spirit.
After graduating high school, he and a friend studied abroad at the private University of Richmond College in England. When they returned to Texas, they began making Super8 films with another friend they had met while away at school.
Fair use doctrine.
In 1974, Bill decided to make the move to Los Angeles and work his way into the film industry. With the help of a friend of his father, he got his first job as a production assistant. He later worked in the art department as a set dresser on super low-budget films for Roger Corman, which is where he first met and became friends with James Cameron.
At the age of 21, he moved to New York and enrolled at NYC in order to study under famous acting teacher Stella Adler. He completed 2 years, but never earned his degree. He returned to L.A. in the pursuit of putting all he had learned to work for him, and he has said that he didn’t think he needed a degree to do that.
In the 1980s, Bill was steadily getting small roles, some of which were in some important cult classic films, such as the blue haired punk in the opening of The Terminator (1984) and the biker vampire Severen in Near Dark (1987). In 1986, he met, fell in love with, and, less than a year later, married his wife and mother of his two children, Louise Newbury.
Regardless how small the role, Bill always left an impression. The first movie role he really stood out in for me was as the tyrant older brother with the goofy laugh, Chet Donnelly in Weird Science (1985). Even though we hated that guy, we still couldn’t help but like him. One of his most memorable character roles is the young and cocky marine with the witty one liners, PFC William L. Hudson, in Aliens (1986). He also played the role of Patrick Swayze’s brother, whose death is avenged in Next of Kin (1989).
Fair use doctrine.
In the 1990s, Paxton continued to steadily get acting roles. He teamed up with the other Bill, Bill Pullman, in the twisted horror sci-fi film Brain Dead (1990) and played LAPD detective Lambert in Predator 2 (1990). Another memorable character, though maybe not as well known as others is Graham Krakowski, the young up and coming professional who is framed for murder by a crazed squatter in the hilarious horror comedy The Vagrant (1992).
In 1993, Bill Paxton had finally risen to well deserved fame co-starring along side Sam Elliot, Kurt Russell, and Val Kilmer as Morgan, Wyatt Earp’s younger brother, in Tombstone.
Fair use doctrine.
Throughout the 1990s, he continued to work alongside some of the most iconic actors of our time and under the direction of some of the best in the business in films like True Lies (1994) opposite Jamie Lee Curtis and, once again, Arnold Schwarzenegger. And directed by longtime friend James Cameron. The Academy Award-nominated Ron Howard film Apollo 13 (1995) co-starring Tom Hanks and Kevin Bacon in which he was nominated and won a SAG award and One of my personal favorites, the natural disaster thriller Twister (1996) He worked again with friend James Cameron on Titanic (1997) and starred opposite Billy Bob Thorton in A Simple Plan (1998), with whom he also co-starred in his first starring role back in 1991s One False Move. Paxton received his first Golden Globe nomination in 1999 for his work in the HBO miniseries A Bright Shinning Lie (1998).
Fair use doctrine.
In 2001, Paxton directed his first feature film Frailty in which he co-starred with Matthew McConaughey and Powers Booth. Rightfully he was nominated and won the 2003 Filmmaker’s Showcase Award. A few years later he directed his second feature, Disney’s biographical film The Greatest Game Ever Played (2005) starring Shia Lebouf.
Between his two directorial debuts, Bill Paxton played the free loving musician/ resort owner, Coconut Pete in the Broken Lizard slasher comedy Club Dread (2004).
In the last decade of his life, Bill seemed to only take on more serious roles, starring in the HBO series Big Love in which he portrayed a Utahan polygamist and which explored his relationships with his multiple wives. He received three Golden Globe nominations for that role.
In 2012, Bill won a well-deserved, SAG award for his role as Randall McCoy in the History Channel’s miniseries Hatfields & McCoys. He continued to stay busy with several film projects throughout the next seven years, including the horror sci-fi The Colony (2013).
He had a substantial supporting role as crooked ex-black ops CIA agent Earl in the Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlburg action comedy 2 Guns (2013). Paxton always did play a good bad guy.
He had a recurring role on Marvel’s Agents of S.H.E.I.L.D. as a vengeful member of Hydra, John Garrett, and he played Joe Loder, Louis Blooms’ (Jake Gyllenhaal) main competitor in the pursuit of gruesome accident/crime scene footage, in Nightcrawler (2014).
Bill did a superb job of portraying Sam Houston in History Channel’s miniseries about the Texas revolution, Texas Rising, alongside Jeffery Dean Morgan, Chistopher McDonald, Ray Liotta, and many others.
Fair use doctrine.
In 2016, he co-starred as crooked cop Det. Keenan in Term Life opposite Vince Vaughn and Mike Epps as well as another crooked cop and abusive father Wayne Carraway in Mean Dreams.
At the time of his death, Paxton had completed filming 13 episodes of the CBS spinoff of the 2001 film Training Day. He even got to work alongside his son James in an episode of the series.
Looking back at his life and works actually makes saying farewell to this beloved actor even more bittersweet. Laughter and a few tears went into this article, and I think that’s fitting for a man like Bill Paxton who, by all accounts, was a friendly, and joyous person in life and seamlessly and fearlessly let that, as well as everything else he was or was just pretending to be, get absorbed by the cameras for his fans to enjoy. Thank you for the many years of entertainment that will continue.
RIP, sir.
Fair use doctrine.
May 17, 1955 – February 25, 2017
Posted by Tabitha Harvey in EDITORIALS, HORROR HEROES, OBITUARY, 2 comments
EDITORIAL: 6 Horror Movies That The New MST3K Crew Needs to Tackle

EDITORIAL: 6 Horror Movies That The New MST3K Crew Needs to Tackle

MST3K-Share-Image
Fans of bad cinema can rejoice because the new season of MST3K is upon us. Here is my list of movies Jonah and the bots can rip a new one. Also don’t take offense if we mention a movie you like; it’s all in good fun. In fact, a lot of these are favorites of mine (minus The Outing), and, as the theme song goes, “it’s just a show you should really just relax”.
We’ve got movie sign!

6. Blood Rage (1987)

06_MST3K_Blood Rage (1987) / Fair use doctrine.True, MST3K never really tackled the slasher genre in the past but couldn’t you picture the incredibly campy, sleazy and fun of late 80s Blood Rage as an episode? I mean actress Louise Lasser boozing it up, not to mention the scene in which she sits spread eagle by the fridge, binge eating would have the guys rolling! Drive-In Massacre is another film that would easily bridge the slasher-MST3K divide.

5. The Prey (1984)

05_MST3K_The Prey (1984) / Fair use doctrine.An older, low budget, slice and dice movie about six wide eyed campers getting picked off by a mysterious killer. Bad acting, bad production values, and a so-so story would equal MST3K gold.

4. Rock ‘n’ Roll Nightmare (1987)

04_MST3K_Rock ‘n’ Roll Nightmare (1987) / Fair use doctrine.Seeing how the original crew did Jon Mikl Thor’s Zombie Nightmare it only seems fitting that the new guys tackle Rock ‘n’ Roll Nightmare a wonderfully bad film that is enjoyable in its own right. Of course, the infamous shower scene will have to get axed, but it would be worth it to see how the guys react to Thor’s spiked underwear and glam rock makeup as well as a whole host of laughable monsters. Truly a classic episode in the making. Seeing how Thor himself is a fan of the show, a cameo might even be possible.

3. Creep (1995)

03_MST3K_Creep (1995) / Fair use doctrine.This shot on video “epic” by director Tim Ritter has all the elements for a great episode. Its amazingly awful in all departments yet it still retains enough “so bad its great” charm that would make this perfect for the riffed treatment. I could also see Ritter’s Killing Spree riffed, but, honestly, Creep just has something extra special. Maybe it’s the hacked together plot, the cringe worthy acting or random things like a close up of a fly…Whatever it is I`d love to see it featured.

2. The Outing aka The Lamp (1987)

]02_MST3K_The Outing (1987) / Fair use doctrine.I reviewed this PAINFULLY bad late 80s horror film for my upcoming film guide, and I couldn’t help but wish I had Mike or Joel or now Jonah and the bots could have helped me through the trauma. The Outing is a lame duck mishmash of horror and drama that fails on every level. Never heard of it? Well, neither had I until Scream Factory (Shout Factory) released it on DVD and later Blu.

1. Troll 2 (1990)

01_MST3K_Troll 2 / Fair use doctrine.The one, the only, the infamously bad Troll 2 should be, NO, needs to be featured on an episode. Sure we got a Rifftrax from Mike, Kevin, and Bill to slake our thirst, but truly this is a job for the good folks at the SOL. In fact, I think that with the right jokes, this could easily be the new crew’s Manos (Joel era) or Werewolf (Mike era). I can just imagine the epic skits that could go with it.
Honorable Mentions: The Giant Claw, Black Roses, Scalps, Troll, Ghostkeeper, and Robo Vampire (yes, that movie really exists).
Posted by Mike Vaughn in EDITORIALS, STAFF PICKS, 0 comments
WiHM: A Matter of Respect

WiHM: A Matter of Respect

February in my life is a pretty active month. Not only is it the shortest month of the year, we also get to celebrate my birthday, my sons birthday, and geographically this is supposed to be the month where we get the most snowfall and I happen to love snow! But this is also a very special time of year for horror fans as it is Women in Horror Month. As a writer for House of Tortured Souls, I could very easily pick one name of a well-deserved list of actresses and give you a couple of highlights of her career and a quick biography, but as the founder and CEO of House of Tortured Souls, I feel it is my responsibility – and my honor – to generalize the importance of the celebration of Women in Horror Month itself.
From the beginning of horror films women always played a much more important role that people actually give credit for. In the earlier days of horror cinema, the women usually portrayed poor and defenseless women who were attacked by a creature of the night. Usually helpless and seemingly brainless, they almost never spoke back or acted to defend themselves, reflecting society’s view of women at the time.
Through the years, however, the female role and presence on screen became larger as women’s roles in society changed. And as their roles changed, the characters (and even names of the actresses) became iconic, ultimately being being dubbed Screen Queens. At first, these roles were primarily in slasher films, where often attractive buxom young ladies let loose with glass shattering screams while being attacked and murdered – usually topless during a shower or bedroom scene. You always remembered the scene and the face.
As the popularity of the Scream Queens grew, so did the role of women in horror – on screen and off. Female leads became stronger on screen, and women who watched these films were inspired to go into horror. In fact, these immense changes in the way that women were portrayed in horror soon inspired women to branch into other areas of horror cinema. Women no longer went only for on screen roles but also for behind the scenes roles as writers, directors, producers, makeup artists, and virtually ever other aspect of horror filmmaking.
Now, in 2017, many Scream Queens who first started in the industry at a young age are being honored by lifetime achievement awards, and those who stay behind the camera are making groundbreaking films, shorts, and TV shows.
Scream Queens will always have a place in horror cinema, but there’s another change in the on screen female characters in the horror industry. Women have gone from solely being the victim to sometimes being the killer. Along with the other changes in the industry, horror films have again changed up the role of women characters. The tables have turned, and horror movies will never be the same. As for the women in the industry are concerned, from film to TV and all aspects involved, the female presence is very strong and very welcomed.
It’s nice to see these talented women getting their notoriety and respect.
As I sit back and reflect, many names cross my mind, names that helped lay the foundations for what has been built and for what is yet to come. Some of these names are:
These are but a few the iconic women in horror cinema! All of these women have, in one way or another, brought a part of them to the silver screen and made a huge impact on not only me, but also on the world of horror fans.
I’m very proud to be an avid horror fan, and I’m doubly proud to be a supporter of the Women in Horror Month.
You have a lot to be proud of, ladies! Much respect!!
Keep It Evil…
Posted by John Roisland in Categories, EDITORIALS, 0 comments
TRIBUTE: In Remembrance of Sir John Hurt (Updated)

TRIBUTE: In Remembrance of Sir John Hurt (Updated)

On the 25th of January 2017, the world lost one of the most prolific and iconic actors to grace us with their presence on the silver screen. Sir John Hurt publicly announced that he had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2015. Dedicated to his craft, he continued to perform while undergoing treatments. By the end of that year, he announced that his cancer had gone into remission. So, it was surprising and sad to hear that he had passed away, three days after his 77th birthday, in his home in Cromer, Norfolk.
If you grew up in the 80s, like me, you may have been introduced to John Hurt in the classic science fiction/horror film Alien. He played Executive Officer Kane in one of the most unforgettable scenes in film history: the alien chest-buster scene. He even replayed this scene in Space Balls, the Mel Brooks parody of science fiction films. After that, I always recognized him in any role, and he always brought a smile to my face – regardless of the type of character he was playing.
Hurt’s career spanned over 60 years, with over 129 films and dozens of television appearances. Some of his films are of massive importance, from films that advanced the art of filmmaking (Midnight Express, The Elephant Man, and Perfume) to the films that affected the global social conscience (Watership Down, 1984, and V for Vendetta) to his appearances in films based on “geek” culture (Hellboy, the Harry Potter films, and Indiana Jones) to his contributions to the horror genre (The Ghoul, Alien, and Frankenstein Unbound). One thing that I had always noticed about him is that he always took his roles seriously. Even when comedy was called for, John never failed to give his best performance.
In one of his final performances, he portrayed an incaration of one of the most important British characters in television history – a character that has existed for about the same length of time as his own career. He played the War Doctor, a version of The Doctor from the BBC series Doctor Who, a role which is of ultimate importance to the plot of the main character and his background.
John Hurt has left behind some of the most impressive works in film history and will always be remembered as one of the greatest actors of all time. I hope you rest well, Sir John.
Sir John Hurt
(22 January 1940 – 27 January 2017)

Good-bye, and thank you.

UPDATE: This article has been updated to replace an image of Gary Oldman.
-Woofer McWooferson Woofer's Paw Print microscopic
Posted by Alf Benny in EDITORIALS, OBITUARY, TRIBUTE, 0 comments
EDITORIAL: Why Aren’t We Watching The Exorcist?

EDITORIAL: Why Aren’t We Watching The Exorcist?

By Dixielord
We’re all friends here right? I don’t want to make assumptions but we have built up some small amount of trust haven’t we? Sure maybe I’m a little too generous on some films, but overall I try to steer ya right. So, anyway, I think, and hope, I’m not too far out of line in wanting to ask you this.. I just feel I need to ask, and I hope you aren’t offended, but, why the fuck aren’t you watching The Exorcist?
The Exorcist movie poster / Image: FOX TV and The Exorcist. Fair use doctrine.
I know, I know. I grimaced and groaned when I first heard about the movie being plundered for a TV series. With the critical success of Hannibal, and the commercial success of The Walking Dead, television has been looking for any and every horror property to look for a series. Some, like The Omen are stillborn (too far to stretch for a pun?), but honestly, quite a few have been good to great (Bates Motel, Ash vs Evil Dead). So why are people so reluctant to give The Exorcist a chance? Honestly, I don’t know. TV, at least recently, has as good as or a better, record of “remaking” horror properties than the big screen. But we are letting The Exorcist die, and I’m saying “we” because it took four episodes in before I decided to give it a chance.
Geena Davis and Alfonso Herrera from The Exorcist / Image: FOX TV and The Exorcist. Fair use doctrine.

I wasn’t willing to give The Exorcist a shot at first

Luckily I have a hand full of friends whom I really trust with movie and TV suggestions. Now I don’t always agree, but I agree often enough that I respect them and usually follow those suggestions. So I gave The Exorcist a try.
I loved it. I watched the first four episodes twice to let it soak in. No joke. I’m still watching. It gets better each episode and it doesn’t pull any punches. It’s bloody and gory, maybe not to the extremes of Hannibal but it doesn’t shirk from wetworks. It also doesn’t back away from our main character, played by Hannah Kasulka committing murder while under demonic possession. This folks is real horror. The best true horror on television right now. It’s good a good story, great acting and some very cool effects. It pays great homage to the Blair possession make up and effects without carbon copying them. What I’m trying to say is, it’s really good.
So why aren’t “we” as a horror community watching? It has a killer (overused pun) cast including Kasulka, Geena Davis, Ben Daniels, Alfonso Herrara, Alan Ruck, and Sharon Gless. I’m trying not to give out any spoilers, but the series ties in directly to the original movie. Forget all the mediocre sequels (other than Legion) this is, in fact (possible spoiler), a direct sequel to the classic film starring Linda Blair. Including a flash back type sequence, and “news reel” footage of the after effects of the original film. I should also give a shout out to Sophie Thatcher who plays a young Regan. She does a great job of bridging the gap between Blair and …. I’m not telling you that part. You need to watch. You really need to watch.
Seriously, you need to watch. The ratings, honestly, suck. The fact the show is on FOX isn’t comforting, either. With their history, we cant count on them to give the series two or three seasons to build an audience. And we shouldn’t get too pissed at them if they cancel The Exorcist. We are the ones who aren’t watching, who aren’t supporting it. Now if you are watching, ignore this, keep up the good work. If you tried it and didn’t like it, well to each their own, at least you gave it a shot. It wouldn’t hurt to give it another shot, watch a few more episodes, but I won’t harangue you about it.
But for those who refuse to give it a chance… for those who never gave Hannibala chance, what the fuck, man? Horror fans, nerd fans, we got it good right now. Let’s not lose another great show because we couldn’t even bother to give it a fucking look. We couldn’t invest the time to check out four episodes or so. The Exorcist is worth at least that much effort. It will die without our support. If not this season, then next. I don’t know what the creator’s long term goal is, but I want to see it run its natural course and not end prematurely.
You can catch new episodes of The Exorcist Friday Nights on Fox with past episodes available on Demand.
Posted by Allen Alberson in EDITORIALS, 2 comments
JEBEDIAH FILM REVIEW

JEBEDIAH FILM REVIEW

By Nicole Robinson

They are a few things in life that are better than a satisfying horror movie. Finding one has become much more difficult since the era of the comic book splashed onto the big screen. In times such as these, some horror fans choose to kick rocks and whine rather than turn to the straight to streaming gems that can be found. This is a mistake and if you need proof, go to Amazon. There you will find Jebediah, a story of a menacing, sickle wielding Amish man with a creative and expressive love of killing from director Joe Ripple and starring Brian Greenwell.

In the role of Jebediah, Greenwell portrays a silent and creepy Amish man with a presence that creates an intimidating persona instilling fear into the victims and the viewers. Greenwell manages to capture a spark of madness as a silent killer. This is no easy task. While a silent killer like Michael Myers can be seriously terrifying, it can also be comical if not portrayed properly. Greenwell almost makes it look easy, leaving the viewer wondering what dark place this actor had to go to in order to embody the role of this madman in the title role of Jebediah.

The main point that can be said about this flick is the violence leaves the viewer wanting nothing in the end. No one is safe and by the end, the carnage leaves no one unscathed. What starts out as a seemingly innocent camping trip among a small group of girlfriends, ends in a blood bath while leaving the audience trying to figure out who among them is going to make it out alive. Lacking predictability is an important feature for any horror movie, and Jebediah manages to make it look easy. Don’t bother trying. Just sit back and enjoy the ride. And don’t worry, the annoying blond one who is wearing the wedges while walking in the woods does die in the most glorious of ways. Writer Robert Ziegler held nothing back when he penned the deaths of Jebediah’s victims. Spoilers withheld, this is not a film for the faint of heart.

From the moment Jebediah curb stomped an infant strapped to a car seat, the audience knows they are in for a treat. Jebediah is not just creepy, but disturbingly violent, providing a level of satisfaction for the viewers that has been seemingly lacking in recent years from the blockbuster films on the big screen. By the end of this slasher film, an uncomfortable, yet satisfying feeling of dread is left with the viewer, probably hoping there is a sequel (there is not sadly). One thing is for certain, this is a fine piece of horror.

Starring: Danielle Lozeau, Jessy Danner, Lauren Lakis, Jemma McDime, Sabrina Taylor-Smith, and Brian Greenwell

To find out more or get your own copy, CLICK HERE 

Posted by Nicole Robinson in EDITORIALS, EXCLUSIVE, HOME, MOVIE REVIEWS, 0 comments