Madonna

Mary Lambert and Pet Sematary sign

Mary Lambert

Stephen King and Mary Lambert on the set of Pet Sematary

Mary Lambert has always been a household name for music fans, having begun her career directing music videos for the likes of Madonna, Bobby Brown, The Eurythmics, and much more.

Following the success of her first feature film Siesta in 1987, Lambert’s follow up film, Pet Semetary, reached an all new audience – horror fans!

Lambert carefully, and respectfully, worked alongside Stephen King to create a visual adaptation of one of his more popular novels (at the time) and to bring the characters within his book to life.

Mary Lambert

Stephen King and Church the cat from Pet Sematary

With Lambert’s vision and willingness to shoot the film in King’s home state of Maine, the film evolved wonderfully and became the classic that it is known for by horror fans today.

The casting choices of amazing actors such as Dale Midkiff, Denise Crosby, Micah Hughes, Brad Greenquist, and the late Fred Gwynne, made the film a powerful portrayal of a family caught between the moral and immoral when unthinkable tragedy befalls them.

Despite the huge commercial success of Lambert’s adaptation of Pet Semetary, she continued to primarily make music videos. In between, she created films like The Attic with Tom Malloy. Her sequel Pet Semetary 2, which starred Edward Furlong and Clancy Brown, was sadly a cinematic flop but gained a following with a certain crowd.

Mary LambertRecently, Lambert appeared in Unearthed & Untold: The Path to Pet Semetary, a phenomenal documentary by John Campopiano and Justin White, about the making of Lambert’s iconic film.

Lambert herself, alongside many other cast and crew, candidly discussed the film’s production and throughout the documentary, she is praised by her colleagues.

Despite her minimal and infrequent interactions within the horror genre, it is undeniable that Lambert is known primarily for a memorable horror film.

Mary LambertPersonally, Pet Semetary was the turning point for me and the beginning of a passion for horror and reading Stephen King novels. It is a twisted tale of sorrow and despair, and Lambert’s ability to garner an emotional response from her viewers, proves her place as a director within the horror world- even after nearly thirty years, I talk to many fans about the impact of Gage and the kite scene during their childhood viewing and how emotional that moment was for them.

With news of her unforgettable film facing a remake (due for release April 19, 2019), fans are curious to know how Lambert feels about the news.

Pet Sematary - Zelda, Church, and Pascow

WiHM: Salute to Mary Lambert and Her Infamous Retelling of a Stephen King Classic

WiHM: Salute to Mary Lambert and Her Infamous Retelling of a Stephen King Classic

Mary Lambert and Pet Sematary sign

Mary Lambert

Stephen King and Mary Lambert on the set of Pet Sematary

Mary Lambert has always been a household name for music fans, having begun her career directing music videos for the likes of Madonna, Bobby Brown, The Eurythmics, and much more.

Following the success of her first feature film Siesta in 1987, Lambert’s follow up film, Pet Semetary, reached an all new audience – horror fans!

Lambert carefully, and respectfully, worked alongside Stephen King to create a visual adaptation of one of his more popular novels (at the time) and to bring the characters within his book to life.

Mary Lambert

Stephen King and Church the cat from Pet Sematary

With Lambert’s vision and willingness to shoot the film in King’s home state of Maine, the film evolved wonderfully and became the classic that it is known for by horror fans today.

The casting choices of amazing actors such as Dale Midkiff, Denise Crosby, Micah Hughes, Brad Greenquist, and the late Fred Gwynne, made the film a powerful portrayal of a family caught between the moral and immoral when unthinkable tragedy befalls them.

Despite the huge commercial success of Lambert’s adaptation of Pet Semetary, she continued to primarily make music videos. In between, she created films like The Attic with Tom Malloy. Her sequel Pet Semetary 2, which starred Edward Furlong and Clancy Brown, was sadly a cinematic flop but gained a following with a certain crowd.

Mary LambertRecently, Lambert appeared in Unearthed & Untold: The Path to Pet Semetary, a phenomenal documentary by John Campopiano and Justin White, about the making of Lambert’s iconic film.

Lambert herself, alongside many other cast and crew, candidly discussed the film’s production and throughout the documentary, she is praised by her colleagues.

Despite her minimal and infrequent interactions within the horror genre, it is undeniable that Lambert is known primarily for a memorable horror film.

Mary LambertPersonally, Pet Semetary was the turning point for me and the beginning of a passion for horror and reading Stephen King novels. It is a twisted tale of sorrow and despair, and Lambert’s ability to garner an emotional response from her viewers, proves her place as a director within the horror world- even after nearly thirty years, I talk to many fans about the impact of Gage and the kite scene during their childhood viewing and how emotional that moment was for them.

With news of her unforgettable film facing a remake (due for release April 19, 2019), fans are curious to know how Lambert feels about the news.

Pet Sematary - Zelda, Church, and Pascow


Posted by Michelle MIDI Sayles in STAFF PICKS, WOMEN IN HORROR, 0 comments
MOVIE REVIEW: Boxing Helena (1993)

MOVIE REVIEW: Boxing Helena (1993)

By Amy Mead

Boxing Helena

Directed by Jennifer Chambers Lynch

Story written by Phillipe Caland

Screenplay written by Jennifer Chambers Lynch

Starring Julian Sands, Sherilyn Fenn, Bill Paxton, Kurtwood Smith and Art Garfunkel

 

Dr. Nick Cavanaugh is a successful surgeon living on a posh Atlanta estate who is as lonely as the day is long. Lonely and harboring some pretty hardcore mommy issues, he becomes obsessed with the beautiful and beguiling Helena after a clandestine one night stand. He is unable to shake the memory of her, in spite of being engaged to his lovely fiance Anne. His enchantment with Helena leads him to many careless acts, including climbing the trees outside her apartment and peeping on her and pretty much stalking her. 

Nick throws a party one night and foolishly invites Helena. He is forced to witness her flirt with a young man at the party. Helena becomes the talk of the party when she removes her dress and goes for a nice, sexy stroll through the majestic water fountain in Nick's garden and then leaves with the young man she just met. The way Nick feels for Helena is written all over his face as he watches her in the fountain, leading to an angry confrontation with his fiance Anne in which he denies any sort of relationship with Helena. 

The next day Helena returns to Nick's estate to retrieve something she mistakenly left something behind at the party.  This leads to an awkward standoff between Nick and Helena and she tries to leave in a hurry and winds up getting hit by a car in front of Nick's property, leaving her with some pretty gnarly damage to her legs.

Lucky for Helena (or is it?), Nick is a surgeon and he is able to treat her right there in his home and keep her alive. However, when Helena finally wakes, she discovers that both of her legs are gone and she is virtually a prisoner in Nick's palatial home. Nick uses excuse after excuse as to why he is keeping her there and eventually Helena tries to strangle him. bad move on her part as she then wakes up and her perfectly healthy arms have also been removed.

She is now completely dependent upon the man who has taken his obsession to another level and she is beginning to resign herself to the fact that she may never make it out alive...

 

 

Boxing Helena is the directorial debut from Jennifer Chambers Lynch and it garnered just as much controversy during its creation as it did once it played to shocked audiences upon its completion. There were many legal woes as a lawsuit was filed against Kim Basinger for backing out of a verbal agreement to play the titular role. The studio won and it cost her a cool seven million dollars, thus placing the film in the spotlight before it was even in the can. 

It turns out it was what was best for the film in the long run. I cannot see this film being even half as good with Basinger in the role of Helena. I have a hard time seeing anyone but the sexy siren Sherilyn Fenn (yes, she is my woman crush) playing her, even knowing that Madonna was up for the role at one point. Sherilyn Fenn is Helena. No question about it for me. I think she is the only one who could exude the sexiness required for the role and do it any justice.

Jennifer Chambers Lynch gets a lot of hate for this movie but I personally love it. I have since my first viewing upon the film's video release WAY back in the nineties. I don't care what anyone says, I think her direction on this film is fantastic. I have also heard that Fenn and Sands have both received criticism for their performances in the years since the films release, but I think the roles of Nick and Helena were played exactly the way they needed to be, by who they needed to be. Being that Chambers Lynch adapted the screenplay from Phillipe Caland's story herself, their performances were more than likely exactly what she was after. 

Given the subject matter, one might be led to believe that the film would be ultra gory but that is not the case here at all. We are not made privy to the act of Helena's limbs being taken from her, we are only made witness to the aftermath and Helena's shock upon waking up and realizing that parts of her are missing. We witness her downward mental spiral and it is truly horrific and heartbreaking to watch her decline into anger, sadness. and despair and it is almost heartbreaking to watch, until we start to see that in spite of everything, she has retained her fiery spirit after all. She unleashes her fury and holds nothing back with her verbal tirades upon Nick. She abuses him right back with her words and it's very refreshing to see. 

While Boxing Helena is not your typical horror film by any means, even without the gore and jump scares, the film is quite terrifying purely based on its subject matter alone. It takes a really unhinged person to subject someone you "love" to the humiliation he places upon Helena. The thought of going through what Helena does makes my skin crawl. SO creepy. 

Say what you want about Boxing Helena, but I myself love it. It may not be in your face horror but it is truly horrific nonetheless. I have watched it countless times and will watch it countless more. If you haven't seen it yet (and I don't know how that's possible) you need to. Immediately. 

I give Boxing Helena a solid  9/10 

 

 

Posted by Alan Smithee in MOVIE REVIEWS, REVIEWS, 0 comments