Marc DeFeo

Part one of a special two-part Saturday Night Shocker: The Amityville Horror

On a December day in 1975, the Lutz family arrives at their new home: 112 Ocean Avenue on the South Shore of Long Island.
Before they start moving in, the mother, Kathleen, tells her three children that the previous owners were murdered in the house. She asks if living there will bother them. Nine year-old Danny, who is the oldest, can barely grasp the concept of murders or death. He isn’t unfamiliar with threatening or sinister concepts, however; his stepfather, George, has bookshelves full of books on hypnosis, the occult, and something called “transcendental meditation”.
Danny trusts his mother and knows she wouldn’t let anything bad happen to them. This house will be a fun new adventure. It’s right on the water and there’s a boathouse and even a pool. He tries to think of an exciting future instead of stories of a spooky past.
He looks at the huge house and wonders which room will be his; maybe one of the rooms with the funny windows.
The windows look like eyes.
Ten years before, another family moved into the house optimistic for a fresh start.
Ronald and Louise DeFeo had a turbulent marriage. Fed up with Ronald’s infidelity and beatings, Louise had briefly moved out of their Brooklyn apartment with their four children, Ronald Jr. (“Butch”), Dawn, Allison, and Mark. Upon her return, Ronald bought the opulent three-story Dutch-Colonial in the affluent community of Amityville. Soon after, they had a fifth child, John.
Fair use doctrine.
DeFeo family portraits
Ronald was the service manager at his father-in-law’s car dealership and, while it wasn’t the most prosperous position, money was somehow never a problem. The house was lavishly decorated. Louise didn’t work and Butch lost jobs frequently but wasn’t concerned with money since his father supplied him with a generous allowance. Ronald commissioned portraits done of the family: one of him pouring a glass of wine for Butch, one of Dawn and Allison reading from a picture book, one of Marc and John by a lake backdrop, and one of Louise posed regally by herself, recalling the modeling she had done before her marriage. There was also a portrait of Louise’s father, Micheal Brigante, the unquestioned benefactor of the family’s wealth. Micheal Brigante was a childhood friend of Carlo Gambino and the dealership was allegedly a front for Gambino’s criminal activity such as money laundering and disposal of weapons. Ronald had a hiding place for money and the dealerships books under the floor of his closet.
The problems the family had hoped to escape just flourished in their new setting. Ronald had girlfriends in the city and Louise was said to have had an affair with the artist who did the family portraits. Ronald continued to beat Louise and turned the abuse on Butch and Dawn. The younger children avoided abuse but witnessed fights that often turned physical. Butch once pointed a gun at his father to make him stop hitting Louise. He pulled the trigger but it didn’t fire, which Ronald viewed as a miracle. After that, he had Butch and his friend Bobby Kelske put religious statues and a small shrine in the backyard.
Butch and Dawn both used drugs and alcohol to cope with their dysfunctional family life. Dawn wanted to move to Florida with a boyfriend but her father forbid it. She fought back, even going after Ronald with a butcher knife during one argument, but didn’t leave. Butch was also at odds with their father. Butch and a friend had supposedly been robbed while taking a large amount of money to the bank. Ronald didn’t believe him, which led to fights at the dealership where employees heard Ronald call Butch “the devil” and said he needed to get the devil off his back. Butch told Dawn he had heard their father and Louise’s uncle plotting to kill him.
Butch knew he had to strike first.
Danny told his mother living in the new house wouldn’t bother him but he wasn’t sure. The day they moved in, a priest came to bless the house. Danny saw the priest go upstairs and then immediately leave. He went into the room where the priest had been and saw swarms of flies. Danny killed as many of the flies as he could, but, when he brought his mother in to show her, they had disappeared. A few nights later, Danny and his little brother and sister accidentally broke a pane in the window in their playroom and both Kathy and George had beaten all three of them.
Danny was used to George’s authoritative, domineering ways; he made the children call him “Sir” and, after marrying Kathy, insisted on adopting the children because he wanted them to have his name if he was going to take responsibility for them. George hadn’t been working since the move and seemed stressed and sick, always cold and building fires in the fireplace to keep him warm. He woke up every morning at 3:15am for no reason and often heard loud music coming from the living room in the middle of the night. He would yell at Kathy to keep the kids quiet and they all tried to avoid him. After a fight with George, Danny was thrown up the stairs by an unseen force.
That wasn’t the end of the bizarre supernatural things that happened to Danny. He opened the window to get rid of an unexplained terrible odor in the house and the window crashed back down on his hands, literally flattening them. Kathy took him down to the kitchen, where he sat at the table while she called for help. A door in the kitchen opened and a specter entered the room. The specter walked through Danny’s injured hands, healing them like nothing had even happened.
The last night the Lutzes were in the house, the boys’ beds shook violently and levitated. The family was so terrified they didn’t take anything with them when they left.
Fair use doctrine.
The Amityville Horror and The Amityville Horror II: The Possession
SATURDAY NIGHT SHOCKER: The Amityville Horror, Part 1

SATURDAY NIGHT SHOCKER: The Amityville Horror, Part 1

Part one of a special two-part Saturday Night Shocker: The Amityville Horror

On a December day in 1975, the Lutz family arrives at their new home: 112 Ocean Avenue on the South Shore of Long Island.
Before they start moving in, the mother, Kathleen, tells her three children that the previous owners were murdered in the house. She asks if living there will bother them. Nine year-old Danny, who is the oldest, can barely grasp the concept of murders or death. He isn't unfamiliar with threatening or sinister concepts, however; his stepfather, George, has bookshelves full of books on hypnosis, the occult, and something called “transcendental meditation”.
Danny trusts his mother and knows she wouldn't let anything bad happen to them. This house will be a fun new adventure. It's right on the water and there's a boathouse and even a pool. He tries to think of an exciting future instead of stories of a spooky past.
He looks at the huge house and wonders which room will be his; maybe one of the rooms with the funny windows.
The windows look like eyes.
Ten years before, another family moved into the house optimistic for a fresh start.
Ronald and Louise DeFeo had a turbulent marriage. Fed up with Ronald's infidelity and beatings, Louise had briefly moved out of their Brooklyn apartment with their four children, Ronald Jr. (“Butch”), Dawn, Allison, and Mark. Upon her return, Ronald bought the opulent three-story Dutch-Colonial in the affluent community of Amityville. Soon after, they had a fifth child, John.
Fair use doctrine.
DeFeo family portraits
Ronald was the service manager at his father-in-law's car dealership and, while it wasn't the most prosperous position, money was somehow never a problem. The house was lavishly decorated. Louise didn't work and Butch lost jobs frequently but wasn't concerned with money since his father supplied him with a generous allowance. Ronald commissioned portraits done of the family: one of him pouring a glass of wine for Butch, one of Dawn and Allison reading from a picture book, one of Marc and John by a lake backdrop, and one of Louise posed regally by herself, recalling the modeling she had done before her marriage. There was also a portrait of Louise's father, Micheal Brigante, the unquestioned benefactor of the family's wealth. Micheal Brigante was a childhood friend of Carlo Gambino and the dealership was allegedly a front for Gambino's criminal activity such as money laundering and disposal of weapons. Ronald had a hiding place for money and the dealerships books under the floor of his closet.
The problems the family had hoped to escape just flourished in their new setting. Ronald had girlfriends in the city and Louise was said to have had an affair with the artist who did the family portraits. Ronald continued to beat Louise and turned the abuse on Butch and Dawn. The younger children avoided abuse but witnessed fights that often turned physical. Butch once pointed a gun at his father to make him stop hitting Louise. He pulled the trigger but it didn't fire, which Ronald viewed as a miracle. After that, he had Butch and his friend Bobby Kelske put religious statues and a small shrine in the backyard.
Butch and Dawn both used drugs and alcohol to cope with their dysfunctional family life. Dawn wanted to move to Florida with a boyfriend but her father forbid it. She fought back, even going after Ronald with a butcher knife during one argument, but didn't leave. Butch was also at odds with their father. Butch and a friend had supposedly been robbed while taking a large amount of money to the bank. Ronald didn't believe him, which led to fights at the dealership where employees heard Ronald call Butch “the devil” and said he needed to get the devil off his back. Butch told Dawn he had heard their father and Louise's uncle plotting to kill him.
Butch knew he had to strike first.
Danny told his mother living in the new house wouldn't bother him but he wasn't sure. The day they moved in, a priest came to bless the house. Danny saw the priest go upstairs and then immediately leave. He went into the room where the priest had been and saw swarms of flies. Danny killed as many of the flies as he could, but, when he brought his mother in to show her, they had disappeared. A few nights later, Danny and his little brother and sister accidentally broke a pane in the window in their playroom and both Kathy and George had beaten all three of them.
Danny was used to George's authoritative, domineering ways; he made the children call him “Sir” and, after marrying Kathy, insisted on adopting the children because he wanted them to have his name if he was going to take responsibility for them. George hadn't been working since the move and seemed stressed and sick, always cold and building fires in the fireplace to keep him warm. He woke up every morning at 3:15am for no reason and often heard loud music coming from the living room in the middle of the night. He would yell at Kathy to keep the kids quiet and they all tried to avoid him. After a fight with George, Danny was thrown up the stairs by an unseen force.
That wasn't the end of the bizarre supernatural things that happened to Danny. He opened the window to get rid of an unexplained terrible odor in the house and the window crashed back down on his hands, literally flattening them. Kathy took him down to the kitchen, where he sat at the table while she called for help. A door in the kitchen opened and a specter entered the room. The specter walked through Danny's injured hands, healing them like nothing had even happened.
The last night the Lutzes were in the house, the boys' beds shook violently and levitated. The family was so terrified they didn't take anything with them when they left.
Fair use doctrine.
The Amityville Horror and The Amityville Horror II: The Possession
Posted by Laura D. James in BRUTAL REALITY, 0 comments